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The Secretary of War humbly reports to the President of the United States That the following measures appear necessary to be taken in order in some degree to place the United States in a situation to guard themselves from injury by any of the belligerent powers of Europe. 1st. To have all the small arms of the United States put in order for immediate use. 2dly. To have all the cannon in...
Having considered the note of the President of the U.S. to General Knox, on the subject of increased rations; we are of opinion, that a proposition to congress at this time concerning such increase would be inexpedient, even if the question were more free from difficulty, than it is. But liable as it is to objections , the inexpediency of such a proposition now , acquires double force. MS (...
The return of Warder’s bills under protest has embarrassed me so much, as to make me request the favor of your name to the inclosed. You shall hear no more of it. [ Note by TJ: ] In consequence of the above I endorsed E.R’s note for 1000 D. payable at 60. days sight. RC ( MHi ); with TJ’s note subjoined; addressed: “Mr. Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 30 May 1793. Enclosure not found.
Your favor of Aug. 17. was received, and the address it covered was immediately delivered to the President. We are sincerely & affectionately Your’s PrC ( DLC ); entirely in TJ’s hand; at foot of text: “George Wythe, Chancr. of Virginia.” Tr ( ViU : Edgehill-Randolph Papers); 19th-century copy. Recorded in SJL as a letter from “Th:J. & E.R.”
The requisition of departure is, in my judgment, expressed in the most accurate and satisfactory manner possible. It gives me real pleasure to find the strong measure capable of such a softening of feature, while it retains full nerve. Were I to speak for myself, as an individual, I should assent with equal cordiality to the last clause. But I can’t help believing, that it would accord better...
This Indenture this seventeenth day of May in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirteen Between Philip Mazzie a Citizen of Virginia now residing in Pisa in Italy of the one part and Thomas Taylor of the City of Richmond and Commonwealth of Virginia of the other part Witnesseth: that the said Philip Mazzie for and in consideration of the sum of six thousand five hundred dollars to him in...
Among the materials JM drew on for his Report of 1800 were some notes written by Edmund Randolph for a projected essay on the question of whether there was a federal common law of crimes. Although the editors have found no evidence that JM commented on this paper to anyone, its presence in JM’s papers points to its use by the author of the report. The idea that the entire body of English...
MS ( NA : PCC , No. 23, fol. 79). Docketed: “Report of Comee. on Motion of Mr. Middleton Decr. 28. 1781 Mr. Middleton Mr. Clymer Mr. Clark for furnishing the members of Congress with printed Reports before debated.” The first of the proposals shown below is in Edmund Randolph’s hand, the second in JM’s. Resolved, that the secretary upon application to him made for that purpose furnish a copy...
The only additional inquiry, which I have been able to make, concerning Mr S——l, was from Mr Brown; who thinks that the inclinations of that gentleman are strong towards peace; but that he would not hesitate to contend with zeal for any boundary, which his instructions might prescribe. Indeed, if a doubt of his tendency on this head should be considered as the only objection to him, I suspect,...
Knowing, that the President intended to answer your letter , relative to the shares in the two rivers, I did [not] think it necessary to trouble you with an assurance, that I would remind him of it. He tells me, that he has stated to you fully the arrangements, which he meditates. Mr. Short mentioned to me in his last dispatches, that he had proposed to you some time before your resignation a...
You will be so good, as to let it be understood between us, that the mention, which some time ago was made to you by me, of the nomination of your son, was purely confidential between us ; and that on any occasion, which you may have to speak of the time, when it was first known to you, you will refer to the communication of this day only . I am dear sir / with great truth / yr. mo. ob. serv...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Randolph’s hand. Addressed by him to “The honble. James Madison jr. esq of congress Philadelphia.” Docketed by JM, “Novr 8. 1782.” The house of delegates was within two members to day of a sufficient number to proceed to business. Among the reformations, suggested in my last letter but one, the foremost will probably be some attack on those debtors to...
The attorney-general of the United States does himself the honor of replying to the questions, propounded by the secretary of the Treasury of the United States, in his letter of the 12th of October 1791, as follows. 1st.   The Commissioners, appointed in pursuance of the act, incorporating the bank of the United States, have no power, as such, to superintend the election of directors, or to...
I do myself the honor of inclosing to you some very afflicting letters from M. de la Fayette to his intimate friends in Europe. They are accompanied by a letter from Tollendal, addressed to you, which shews the reason of their being sent. Many of them are in French; and I will have them translated, if you should not think, that those, which are in English, and in the same unhappy strain, would...
I must call upon your friendship to excuse me for again mentioning the convention at Philadelphia. Your determination having been fixed on a thorough review of your situation, I feel, like an intruder, when I again hint a wish, that you would join the delegation. But every day brings forth some new crisis, and the confederation is, I fear, the last anchor of our hope. Congress have taken up...
The Secretary of State has the honor of sending to the President a letter from Colo. Smith; upon which he is now in conference with Mr Hammond and the result will be communicated to the President in the morning. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. Samuel Smith’s letter to Randolph of 29 March, sending information about...
The Attorney general of the United States has the honor of submitting to the Secretary of State the following Opinion on the Case of Gideon Henfield, as represented by the Minister of France . 1. It may well be doubted, how far the Minister of France has a right to interfere. Henfield is a citizen of the United States; and it is unusual at least, that a foreign Power should interfere in a...
E. Randolph has the honor of submitting to the President a draft of a letter to Mr Hammond, upon Mr Butler’s statement. Judge Peters thinking that a marshall is immediately wanted, Mr Wm Nicolls’s name is inserted in the commission sent —A blank commission for the accountant is also transmitted. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries...
The secretary of State has the honor of reporting to the President on the letter of Mr Short from San Lorenzo, of Novr 6. 1793, as follows: The first paragraph, and several others succeeding, relate to the causes of delay in the departure of Mr Blake. The four marked thus (X) mention, that Spain has furnished a convoy to American vessels against the Algerines; that the answer, promised by the...
I am directed by the President to acknowlege the Receipt on the 17th. of Your Excellency’s letter dated the 12th instant. The President feels with you the force of the motives which render undesireable an extension of correspondence on the subject in question. But the case being truly one of great importance and delicacy, these motives must yield, in a degree, to the propriety and utility of...
E. Randolph, with compliments to Coll. Hamilton, incloses to him a letter from Mr. Hammond requesting the passport. E. R. has written to him, that by applying to Col. H. the passport will be obtained. LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the Department of State, Vol. 6, January 2–June 26, 1794, National Archives. On March 29, 1794, George Hammond, British Minister Plenipotentiary to the United...
I thank you for your favor of the 10th. inst. from Orange. Colo. Nicholas in a late letter to me seems to think, that the majority is decidedly for the constitution. Accuracy cannot be expected; but a comparison of the intelligence, which centers here from the various parts of Va., persuades me, that he at least mistakes the degree of the majority, and leads me to suspect, that it lies adverse...
No new Occurrence at Cambridge can justify an Intrusion on the well-employ’d Moments of a Delegate. I must, however, urge you, to assign a Reason for the Supineness of Virginia, amidst the Robberies, and other Violations of private Property, said to have been committed by Lord Dunmore. He plunders Custom-Houses, and reviews his Body-Guard at Gosport, unarrested. What is the Conclusion from...
The Secretary of State has the honor of informing the Secretary of the Treasury, that the President of the United States grants a passport to the Spanish Vessel, to which the inclosed papers relate, she being Parlamentario; and that the Spanish Commissioners are informed, that upon application to the Secretary of the Treasury, they will receive the Passport. LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Randolph’s hand. Cover addressed by him to “The honble James Madison jr. esq of congress Philadelphia.” Docketed by JM, “Aug: 30. 1782.” I am rejoiced to hear from Mr. F. Webb, that a succour, altho’ it is moderate, is to be forwarded by Mr. Ambler by the present mail. He can best tell you, how the prospect is of future puncituality towards the...
I returned home three or four days ago, under the vexatious operation of a quartan. I have been correcting it by medicine and hope in a day or two to subdue it. I shall immediately upon recovering my ability to do business with propriety, enter upon and complete the statement of my introductory ideas in Phila. Yrs. afftely. RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM.
E. Randolph has the honor of informing the President, that he saw Judge Wilson yesterday, and Mr Madison last evening. The former, to whom E.R. took an occasion of bringing up the subject of the resolution of the senate in a general Shape, said, that what they might have, he thought, ought to be sent; and what they ought not to have, ought not to be sent. The latter expressed himself thus: “I...
E. Randolph has the honor of sending to the President all the letters of consequence, written to Colo. Humphries concerning the Algerine Mission, since the last money was voted by congress. They are of the following dates. July 19. August 25, Novr 21 on the same sheet with a rough letter to Short—and Decr 31, 1794. It is observable too, that these letters were written, as soon as it was...
The President of the UStates has directed me to acknowlege the Receipt of your letter of the 5th instant and to communicate to you the following reply. In requesting an interview with you, on the subject of the recent disturbances in the Western parts of Pensylvania, the President, besides the desire of manifesting a respectful attention to the Chief Magistrate of a State immediately affected,...
The appointment of Mr Pickering, which is mentioned in your favor of the 21st instant from George Town, was noted in my report on the laws. I mentioned the subject to the attorney-general, who promised to consider, whether a fresh commission was necessary. I have the honor of inclosing a new commission; and if it should appear to be improper or unnecessary, in the opinion of the law-officer, I...
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, 1 Feb. 1792. In a letter of 2 Feb. to Randolph, Tobias Lear mentioned “the Atty Genls note of last evening” to the president. Tobias Lear informed Edmund Randolph: “the President thinks it proper that the Atty Genl should proceed in Cottrell’s case in the manner mentioned in the Atty Genls note of last evening as the result of the conference between him...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Randolph’s hand. Cover addressed to “The honble James Madison jr. esq. of congress Philadelphia To go by the post.” Erroneously docketed by JM, “June 8. 1783.” The last post brought, as usual, your esteemed favor. The friends to the impost, as recommended by congress, finding, that the adoption of that measure in the form of the bill, then depending...
The Secretary of State begs the favor of the Secretary of the Treasury to order a warrant to be made out on account of the foreign fund, in the disposal of the department of State, for twenty thousand Dollars; this being the sum, which from Mr. Jefferson’s memoranda, appears to be proper to be remitted now to the Bankers in Amsterdam for the use of our ministers abroad. Bills are engaged at...
I have the honor to acknowledge your favor of the 21st instant. It shall be properly attended to. Yesterday brought me from New-York a flood of letters from Europe. Mr Jay’s letters are of the 31. Jany—2d feby—5th feby—6. feby—and 22d feby—They mention the letters from me, containing observations upon the two projets; and that he shall write by the Philadelphia Ships fully in answer. He thinks...
On my return home, I found your letter of the 6th. instant. My answer is short; being no more, than this, that there is not a single fee or emolument incident to my office; that I have paid the expences without taking any account, as I expected no retribution; and that my salary is 1900 dollars per annum. I have the honor, sir, to be   with respect   Yr. mo. ob. serv. ALS , RG 46, Second...
I do myself the honor of submitting to your consideration a letter from the late Secretary of the Treasury on the subject of an act passed on the 20th of March last, appropriating to our intercourse with foreign nations an additional million of dollars. He refers to a report, in which he has brought into view the necessity of some further provision, and transmits an extract of a letter from...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). The letter is not signed, but it is in Randolph’s hand. Addressed to “The honble James Madison jr. of congress Philadelphia.” Docketed by JM, “May 5. 1782.” Your flattering urgency for my return, contained in your favor of the 23. Ulto. was answered by anticipation in my letter of last week. I still adhere to the same inclination to revisit you. By the next post, I...
Department of State, January 3, 1795. “I beg leave to lay before you a letter of the 25th. ultimo from the Governor of Virginia with its inclosures. As they relate to a transaction during the embargo, which has been principally connected with the Treasury Department, I must request you to institute such inquiries, or furnish me with such information, as will possess me of the whole affair. I...
Philadelphia, April 24, 1794. “Concurring, as I do, with you, that the treaty between the United States and Sweden, exempts the Vessels of the latter from the operation of the embargo, I beg leave to suggest to you, whether it may not be expedient to give instructions to the several Collectors accordingly.” LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the Department of State, Vol. 6, January 2–June 26,...
The expression in the opinion of the secretary of the treasury, to which you refer in your favor of the 27th ultimo, appears to me to amount to this: that we have lost ground in not being able to give as strong proofs of our neutrality now , as we were some time ago. No doubt he alluded principally to the rejection of the clause, sent from the senate to the house of representatives, for...
E. Randolph, with respectful compliments to Mr. Jefferson, incloses to him the execution, which was accidentally omitted the other day. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
I do myself the honor of informing you that the French Ship L’Orient of Bengal now lying in the port of Philadelphia attracts the attention omit these words (and excites the suspicion) of the Executive. It is represented that on her arrival she was a private ship the property of the French East India company and though armed was without a public Commission (had a complete military equipment...
If the Foederal laws were ever so precise in censuring the conduct, to which you alluded in your communication to me on Saturday last, I should doubt, whether the source of your information is not too delicate to become the groundwork of a public act. Courts would be very reluctant in extracting testimony from the mouth of an associate, and perhaps the character of government demands, that...
When I renewed the note for your friendly favor, just before your departure for the Westward, I did not take up the former one. If you have it, I will thank you for it, when it is convenient to you to send it. But I cannot close this subject, without assuring you of the sense, which I have ever entertained, of this, your disinterested kindness, and which, I can truly say, has never been...
The Secretary of State begs the favor of the opinion of the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War, and of the Attorney General upon the inclosed Letter of Mr. Hammond, of the 9th. ultimo. The point on which your advice will be particularly interesting is, whether the government of the United States is bound to urge the payment requested? LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the Department of...
I have the honor of inclosing to you a translation of the letters of Credence of Chevalier de Freire. By a Mr de Villemont a native and inhabitant of New Orleans, I have received two long letters of the 12th and 14th of august from Mr Short. It is full of dissatisfaction with the treasury-department, the department of state, & Mr Carmichael. With the first, for his having been so constantly...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned and undocketed letter in Randolph’s hand. The cover is missing. The capture of the mail, announced in your favor of the 18th. instant, cannot thro’ my means avail the enemy, nor give pain to either of us. It is impossible indeed to recollect the contents of my letter, as it was leng[thy] but I believe, that the cypher was scarcely necessary for the...
I do myself the honor of inclosing to you a letter from Mr Z. Hollingsworth, attorney for the district of Maryland, in favor of Mr Graybell, as successor to Mr Ramsay. The silver coin of the U.S. bears upon its face so much neatness and simplicity, that I cannot restrain myself from transmitting a dollar for your inspection. In a letter of the 29th of July from Colo. Humphreys, an extract of...
E. Randolph has the honor of observing to the President in reply to his queries; that the ruin of our merchants was expressed as strongly, as it is, in order to prepare Mr Short, in case some nervous measure should be adopted by government, with a general idea of the magnitude of the cause, before a particular explanation could be forwarded to him; and that, altho’ the jealousy mentioned by...
The Secretary of state has the honor of informing the President of the United States, that, having already accounted to him for the sum of thirteen thousand, two hundred dollars, destined for the relief of such of the exiles from St Domingo, as resided in the United States, he has offered the remaining eighteen hundred dollars, as follows: six hundred to Pennsylvania, which have been accepted:...