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(Private) Dear sir Philadelphia April 19. 1794. I called upon Mr Monroe, and obtained his promise, to explain the manner of his procuring the extract, as it was in truth, without my privity and against the rule of the office. But I find, that Mr King was employed in the examination of the same books, at the same time; so that in this instance, the want of equal measure cannot upon any ground...
E. Randolph has the honor of submitting to the President the draft of a letter to the commissioners. It is expected, that their report will be printed in a couple of days. In a conversation, which E.R. has just had with Mr Jaudenes, he observed, that Spain must ultimately coalesce with France; and that he had no communication of business with Mr Hammond, nor Mr Hammond with him. Duplicates of...
I conclude from what you observed yesterday, that in the nomination of an envoy extraordinary to London, you prefer some statement more special, than is customary in nominations. I beg leave therefore to present to you a short review of the subject; that you may determine, whether the occurrences in the legislature are ripe for such a statement. I believe, that I was among the first, if not...
Until monday last I did not obtain from the office those of my own letters, which I deem proper to be introduced into my vindication. But I still want the inspection of a letter from you, dated July 22. 1795, and received by me. I applied personally at the office on Saturday last for the sight of your letters to me. The Chief Clerk went into the room, in which Mr Pickering sits, to consult...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Randolph’s hand. Addressed by him to “The honble James Madison jr. esq of congress Princeton New Jersey.” Docketed by JM, “July 12. 17[83].” Your flight to Princeton has, I presume, been the cause of the post of thursday bringing no letter from you. The proclamation, issued by the executive last week, has occasioned much uneasiness in the minds of...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Randolph’s hand. Cover addressed by him to “The honble James Madison jr. esq of congress Philadelphia.” Docketed by JM, “Apl. 26. 1783.” For four weeks past I have been so hurried by the general court, that I have not had leisure to write a page, irrelative to law. Indeed the calmness of our times cuts off almost every thing worthy of communication....
Private. The only letter, which I had the honor of receiving from you by the mail of yesterday, was one written on monday the 27th instant late in the evening. I mention this circumstance, solely because the first paragraph of it renders it possible, that some other had been sent to the Post-office for the same mail. Mr Woolcott, Colo. Pickering and myself agree in the draft of an answer, now...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned letter in Randolph’s hand. Addressed to “The honble James Madison jr. of congress Philadelphia.” Docketed by JM, “July 5th. 1782.” If before the receipt of your favor of the 25th. Ulto. I could have doubted concerning the policy of the act against British merchandize, the artifices of the enemy and the parricidal villainies of some of the citizens of...
In your message to both Houses of Congress on the 5 of December 1793, you inform them that “the vexations and spoliations, understood to have been committed on our vessels and commerce, by the Cruisers and Officers of some of the belligerent powers appeared to require attention”: that “the proofs of these, however, not having been brought forward, the description of Citizens, supposed to have...
The decision of Massts., had it been adverse to the constn, wd. have damned it here. But as it is, it fixes the event, if N. York, N. Hamp. and Maryland should follow the example. This must be understood with this restriction; that altho’ 9 states will force Va. by their assent to come in, there is reason to believe that no intelligence of that sort can reach us before our convention meets; as...
The Attorney General of the United States does himself the honor of replying to the questions propounded to him by the Secretary of the Treasury, as follows: ☞ 1st. To the statement in the letter of February, 12th: 1791. It does not appear whether the deceased Administrix be interested personally in the estate of her deceased husband. If she were so, although the whole legal right vested in...
Memorandum. Mr Adet came to the office, and told me, that he had come to express to me in an amicable manner the uneasiness, which the treaty with Great Britain had excited in him. Professing not to have seen it, I promised him a copy, and that day delivered it to him. He stated some days afterwards in writing three objections: 1. that we had granted to Great Britain liberty to seize our naval...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Randolph’s hand. Docketed by JM, “May 9th. 1783.” Cover addressed by Randolph to “The honble James Madison jr. esq of congress Philadelphia.” The right margin of the second of the three folios comprising the letter was trimmed so carelessly as to excise portions of the text. The due arrival of your friendly attention by every post has not been...
The secretary of state has the honor of inclosing to the President of the U.S. the opinions of the secretary of the treasury and of the attorney-general, upon the propriety of intrusting to Mr Jay eventual powers for some minister, who may concert with Denmark and Sweden a proper arrangement for the defence of neutral rights. Those gentlemen, as well as the secretary of war are against the...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Randolph’s hand. Cover addressed by him to “The honble James Madison jr. esq of congress Philadelphia.” Docketed by JM, “26. 1782.” Your favor by the last post was duly received, and enabled me to counteract a rumor, which Carleton’s letter had excited, of a thorough disposition and fixed resolution in Great Britain to close the war by the expected...
The attorney general of the U.S. has the honor of reporting to the President of the U.S., on the representation-bill, as follows: The points, which involve the question of constitutionality, are three: The bill does not announce in terms the principle of proceeding, either in the establishment of the total number of 120, or its apportionment among the states. Some principle, however, it must...
I have the honor to acknowledge Colonel Hamilton’s letter of the 6. current written by your direction. Judge Peters and Mr Rawle intend to proceed tomorrow. They will carry with them copies of all the subscriptions. Some of the names indeed are so badly written; that mistakes are inevitable. If therefore any individuals, whose names do not appear, or may be inaccurately transcribed, should...
The Secretary of State has the honor of submitting to the President of the United States a new case, which occurred during his absence, from the minister Resident of the United Netherlands. The documents, connected with the case, and now transmitted are as follows: 1. A commission from the States General of the United Netherlands to Jan Hendrick Christiaan Heineken, bearing date the 17th of...
These “hasty notes” were most probably replies to queries (not found) that JM had posed to Edmund Randolph sometime during the early days of the Virginia General Assembly session in 1799. In his research for that part of the Report of 1800 that dealt with the common law, JM no doubt surveyed the handful of important court decisions that supported the doctrine that the English common law was...
On saturday I was honored by your letter from Baltimore of the 17th instant, together with the one inclosed for Mrs Washington, which I immediately sent to her. Since my letter of friday, a letter from Valiere, the French Consul at algiers, dated the 28th of december last, and addressed to Colo. Humphries, has come hither, with a request contained in the envelope, that the secretary of state...
Immediately upon leaving your house this morning, I went to the office for the department of state, where I directed the room, in which I usually sat, to be locked up, and the key to remain with the Messenger. My object in this was to let all the papers rest, as they stood. Upon my return home, I reflected calmly and maturely upon the proceedings of this morning. Two facts immediately...
The delay, which has hitherto occurred in transmitting to you the inclosed proceedings, will be ascribed, I hope, to its true causes; one of which will be found in my last letter, and the other in the daily expectation of Mr Ross’s visit to Mount-Vernon, in pursuance of our resolution of the 8th of december 1785. You may possibly be surprized, that a work, which has already expended a...
You will perceive from the two letters marked A and B, of which I enclose copies, that the subject of Mr. Pagan has been for some time in my view. The former of those letters being intended for you, and containing a summary of facts; I determined to shew it to Mr. Tilghman, who was Pagan’s Counsel, before it was sent to you, in order that he might correct any mistatement. This produced the...
The Secretary of State begs leave to submit to the President of the United States the following observations on the arrangement of the 800,000 dollars, directed to be borrowed for Algerine purposes. Mr Lamb was supposed to have offered for the ransom of twenty one American Citizens 59,496 dollars; that is, about 2833 dollars each. Mr Simpson is said to have contracted in the Deys own books,...
E. Randolph has the honor of informing the President, that the message of to-day, appears to have given general satisfaction. Mr M-d——n in particular thinks, that it will have a good effect. He asked me, whether an extract could not have been given from Mr Morris’s letter; and upon my answering, that there were some things interwoven with the main subject, which ought not to be promulged, he...
I this morning received the inclosed letter. It relates to a subject, which, notwithstanding the suggestions of Mr King, Mr Burr, Mr Bradford and some other gentlemen, I positively forbid to be mentioned to you. Why I forbid it, the reasons are very, very many; for altho’ the wish of the most respectable of the bar in this city might have seemed to countenance it; yet One reason overpowered in...
Colo. Griffin having announced to me, that you were safely lodged within the fœderal precincts, I shall renew the assault of my uninteresting correspondence. There is a general calm of politicks. The discontented themselves seem willing to wait with temper, until congress shall open their views. It gave me much pleasure, to read your letter to Colo. T. M. Randolph; as it shews a consciousness...
Saturday evening was appointed for the last meeting on the treaty in the state-house yard; and five o’clock was the hour. I waited in town until After six, in hopes of hearing the result. But nothing having transpired, I went into the country, where the rumors of the proceeding were very various and extraordinary. I returned last evening, when I found a letter from Mr Hammond, complaining...
The Secretary of State, after reviewing the letters from our Ministers, unanswered, has the honor to report to the President as follows: Three of those letters are from Messrs Carmichael and Short jointly of June 6th Aug. 15th and Sep. 29th in the last year. The first, which is the only important one, pressed for new instructions, adapted to the new relations, which had sprung up between the...
The Secretary of state has the honor of sending to the President Mr Hammond’s reply, this moment received, and the letter of the 29th of April to which he refers. The President will be so good, as to let the Secretary have the papers, as early in the morning as may be convenient; to have them copied on the supposition of their being proper for congress; and to prepare a short answer as to...