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Having been in considerable pain during the whole of yesterday, I determined in the evening to send for Dr Kuhn; who from 9 o’clock last night to the present moment has been, and is occupying me with repeated doses, bleedings &c. From the present prospect, I doubt, whether I shall have the honor of seeing you for three or four days. But being still able to attend to business, I shall be ready...
Notwithstanding Mr Van Berckel has no right to expect, that I should transmit his letter for your consideration, after what I have written to him; yet I forward it with the view, that if you should not approve a postponement of the subject; I may receive your instructions. If you do, I shall presume your approbation from silence. In truth, it is adviseable to gain as much time as possible. The...
I do myself the honor of informing you, that the plan for opening a contract with the woollen manufacturer, appears, as far as I am able to judge, to be proper in itself, and likely to be approved by the legislature of Virginia. But I must confess, that I have paid more attention to the propriety of the President, undertaking a correspondence with the British Artist. I am told and believe,...
E. Randolph would ⟨have⟩ done himself the honor of waiting on the President with the inclosed, to know his pleasure as to sending the two letters to the Senate and house of representatives, if he was not under a very severe pain of the head. Besides the letters, now sent, he has received by the mail of to-day from Colo. Humphreys, seven others, but containing no recent or important...
Immediately upon leaving your house this morning, I went to the office for the department of state, where I directed the room, in which I usually sat, to be locked up, and the key to remain with the Messenger. My object in this was to let all the papers rest, as they stood. Upon my return home, I reflected calmly and maturely upon the proceedings of this morning. Two facts immediately...
The Secretary of State has the honor of transmitting to the President the translation of the German letter, with the original. AL , DLC:GW . This letter has not been identified.
E. Randolph has the honor of sending to the President a letter, just received from Mr Pinckney; and will thank the President to return them as soon as may be convenient; in order that two of the papers (the orders of council) may go this afternoon to the press. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. The two orders in...
The delay, which has hitherto occurred in transmitting to you the inclosed proceedings, will be ascribed, I hope, to its true causes; one of which will be found in my last letter, and the other in the daily expectation of Mr Ross’s visit to Mount-Vernon, in pursuance of our resolution of the 8th of december 1785. You may possibly be surprized, that a work, which has already expended a...
E. Randolph has the honor of sending to the President a message to accompany the papers from the Spanish commissioners —Also the statement of general officers in the government. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. For this message and its accompanying papers, see GW to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, this...
I saw Mr Woolcott; and upon consultation, it was thought better, that he should proceed with the bank, as upon his own credit; and write immediately to the Secretary of the treasury for a more official sanction, than he yet possesses—We agreed also, that the original of the letter, which he wrote to you, and the copy, which he sent, should be destroyed. If this be agreeable, you will be...
The secretary of state has the honor of informing the President of the United States, that the recommendation of Judge Peters in favor of a pardon for Thomas Norton corresponds with the opinion of Mr Rawle, the district-attorney; that his subject is to be considered now , howsoever it might have been represented at first, as no more than larceny; that his long imprisonment is of itself a...
A New York paper of yesterday declares in the most express terms, that the British instruction of the 8th of June 1793, so far as relates to the carrying of corn, meal and Flour to France, is revoked. It comes in such a shape, that I believe it; and we may hourly expect something on that head. You recollect, that this was the first order, which bore upon the United States, and is the same,...
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, 25 Mar. 1793. GW wrote Randolph on 27 Mar. , acknowledging “your letter to me of the 25t[h] inst.”
The Secretary of State begs leave to submit to the President of the United States the following observations on the arrangement of the 800,000 dollars, directed to be borrowed for Algerine purposes. Mr Lamb was supposed to have offered for the ransom of twenty one American Citizens 59,496 dollars; that is, about 2833 dollars each. Mr Simpson is said to have contracted in the Deys own books,...
E. Randolph has the honor of returning to the President his letter to Mr Johnson with a few pencilled suggestions. The letter from Messrs Scott and Thornton to the President on the 20. April 1795. does not seem to E.R. to be one, which Mr Johnson can require; because it is not an act of the board, directing one thing or another to be done; it is only a comment upon the transaction in general....
E. Randolph has the honor of informing the President, that the message of to-day, appears to have given general satisfaction. Mr M-d——n in particular thinks, that it will have a good effect. He asked me, whether an extract could not have been given from Mr Morris’s letter; and upon my answering, that there were some things interwoven with the main subject, which ought not to be promulged, he...
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, 5 Feb. 1790. GW mentions in his 13 Feb. 1790 letter to Randolph “your letter to me of the 5th inst.”
I this morning received the inclosed letter. It relates to a subject, which, notwithstanding the suggestions of Mr King, Mr Burr, Mr Bradford and some other gentlemen, I positively forbid to be mentioned to you. Why I forbid it, the reasons are very, very many; for altho’ the wish of the most respectable of the bar in this city might have seemed to countenance it; yet One reason overpowered in...
Saturday evening was appointed for the last meeting on the treaty in the state-house yard; and five o’clock was the hour. I waited in town until After six, in hopes of hearing the result. But nothing having transpired, I went into the country, where the rumors of the proceeding were very various and extraordinary. I returned last evening, when I found a letter from Mr Hammond, complaining...
I communicated to Mrs Washington the route, which you marked out in your favor of the 9th current. All under your roof were in their usual good health this morning; and she desired me to say to you, that she will write by the express of Monday. Mr Fauchet certainly believes the destruction of Robespierre; and from circumstances, independent of those, which have been published, he had foreseen...
Altho’ you will have seen the commissioners of the Fœderal City, before their inclosed letter reaches Mount Vernon; I have supposed, that it will be better to transmit it to you. Mr Adet has sent me a decree of the national convention; by which they expressly violate our treaty of commerce with France; by declaring that hostile property may be seized on board of neutral vessels, until their...
Not being able to consult the Secretary of the Treasury, as to his sense of the act, granting a million of dollars for foreign intercourse, I have examined the laws myself; and find, that this sum is in no manner appropriated to the naval armament, as you seemed to suppose in the last conversation, which I had the honor of holding with you on our Algerine affairs. Permit me therefore to...
The Secretary of State, after reviewing the letters from our Ministers, unanswered, has the honor to report to the President as follows: Three of those letters are from Messrs Carmichael and Short jointly of June 6th Aug. 15th and Sep. 29th in the last year. The first, which is the only important one, pressed for new instructions, adapted to the new relations, which had sprung up between the...
E. Randolph has the honor of informing the President, that he last night received several bundles from Mr G. Morris; all of them duplicates, except one No. 35 of his letters. This number incloses so lengthy a correspondence between him and the Minister, in French, that it will be almost impossible to have it translated and copied to-day. The President will therefore determine, whether the...
The Secretary of state has the honor of sending to the President Mr Hammond’s reply, this moment received, and the letter of the 29th of April to which he refers. The President will be so good, as to let the Secretary have the papers, as early in the morning as may be convenient; to have them copied on the supposition of their being proper for congress; and to prepare a short answer as to...
The Secretary of state has the honor of submitting to the President the translation of a letter, of this date from Mr Fauchet, and a proposed answer to him and a letter to Govr Clinton. If the President approves, it is wished to send Mr Fauchet’s letter immediately—The Messenger will accordingly wait. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His...
I do myself the honor of sending to you a copy of the instructions as they were first drawn and submitted to Mr Jay and Colo. Hamilton. My conversations and reflection will probably make several changes in them: but the outlines being there, I think it best to bring the subject before you, as early as possible. In particular, I have notes concerning the commercial treaty; which I shall draw...
I do myself the honor of inclosing to you a certificate from Judge Wilson, of my having qualified, as secretary of state. A duplicate is deposited among the files of the office. I must intreat you, sir, to receive my very affectionate acknowledgments, for the various instances of your confidence; and to be assured, that, let the consequence be, what it may, in this perilous office, no...
On my arrival at Baltimore, Colo. S. Smith gave me a very early and easy opportunity of conversing with him on the subject of his letter to Colo. Hamilton. He repeated the same alarm, as still existing in the breasts of the merchants; adding, however, a confidence in the executive, as being better qualified to judge, from a comprehensive view of our situation. My explanations were apparently...
The Secretary of State has the honor of laying before the President the copy of a proclamation, put into his hands by Govr. St Clair for that purpose. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. The date, which is taken from the letter-book copy, did occur on a Saturday. The docket on the AL reads, “15. Feby 1794.” The enclosed...