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You will be so good, as to let it be understood between us, that the mention, which some time ago was made to you by me, of the nomination of your son, was purely confidential between us ; and that on any occasion, which you may have to speak of the time, when it was first known to you, you will refer to the communication of this day only . I am dear sir / with great truth / yr. mo. ob. serv...
The letter, which Mr. Adams delivered to me from you, was truly acceptable, as well from its friendly style, as the opportunity, which it presented, Of an Acquaintance with him. When he was first contemplated for the Hague, my mind readily embraced the idea, under the influence of his own merit. I must be permitted at the same time to own, that the public services of the father strongly...
I do myself the honor of transmitting to the Senate the translation of a French letter; the original of which was addressed to Congress, and was delivered to me yesterday by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, to be translated. I have the honor, Sir, to be / with the highest respect / yo. mo. ob. serv. DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
The Secretary of State does himself the honor of requesting the favor of an acknowledgment that the enclosed summons has got safe to hand. United States March 3. 1795. The President of the United States to the Vice President of the United States, and President of the Senate Certain matters touching the public good, requiring that the Senate shall be convened on Monday the 8th of June next; you...
I do myself the honor of transmitting to the Senate, the translation of the French act of navigation. It has been executed by the best hand which could be procured; but it is possible, that the novelty of the subject, and certain technical phrases, may have produced inaccuracies. I have the honor to be, &c. Printed Source--American State Papers. 38 vols. (Washington, D.C.: Gales and Seaton,...
E. Randolph presents his best respects to Mr. Adams and informs him, that Mr. Short’s nomination to Madrid must necessarily precede that of his successor to the Hague. Mr. Adams will therefore not be surprized at finding no nomination for the Hague, made to–day. MHi : Adams Papers.
Your friendly answer to the letter, which I took the liberty of addressing to you in favor of Colo. Heath, has increased the attachment, which your civility to me in 1775, and your public conduct since, first produced My application in that gentleman’s behalf being founded on a conviction of his worth, I conceived, that it might not be improper to make that worth known to all those, who might...
I am extremely unwilling, that the department of state should become the vehicle of letters to congress, the contents of which may be improper, and the authors of which perhaps ought to have addressed themselves to the executive, rather than the legislature. Inclosed are two sealed letters, which have been forwarded to the President. He cannot open them, because they are addressed to the...
Mr Randolph presents his respectful Compliments to the vice president of the United States, and president of the Senate— In the communications, made by the President this morning, is an Act of the National Convention of France in the original. It’s length prevented an attempt to translate it; as it would occasion too much delay. But if on this or any other occasion when originals are, from the...
As soon as I received the resolution of the Senate, requiring an abstract to be made of the cases of vexation and spoliation, it was begun. At that time, notwithstanding the pressure of business in the department, I expected soon to accomplish what was called for. But after some days, new cases crouded in so fast; that the number and labour is increased more than four fold. Resuming therefore,...
I could not resist the impulse of my long affection for Geneva, to postpone for a moment the papers, which you were so obliging as to send me last night. Its fate is truly afflicting and injurious to humanity. The transplantation of its academy would fill up a vast chasm in the Education of the United States. For I do not believe, that a complete system is to be found in any state, and I...
I have the honor of returning to you the letter of Mr. J. Q. Adams. It is one among the many proofs of his attention, penetration and fitness for his present functions; which I feel a sincere pleasure in announcing on all proper occasions. The President desires me to present his acknowledgements to you for the communication. It will be agreeable to you to learn, that no intelligence from...
I now do myself the honor of transmitting to the senate, the abstract of vexations and spoliations of our commerce, which was required by their resolution of the 13th. day of March last. The volume sent will shew, that such a business could not be immediately completed. Indeed, sir, I was compelled, by the burthen of business daily depending and arising in the office, to engage a gentleman of...
I am instructed by the President of the United States to ask information from the Treasurer of Virginia, whether the arrearage of the Virginia donation to the fœderal city can be now paid. The public service suffers much from the want of it, and I must therefore request an answer, as soon as it may be convenient. If the money cannot be immediately advanced, the President would be glad to know,...
The Secretary of State begs the favor of the opinion of the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War, and of the Attorney General upon the inclosed Letter of Mr. Hammond, of the 9th. ultimo. The point on which your advice will be particularly interesting is, whether the government of the United States is bound to urge the payment requested? LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the Department of...
I had a personal interview with Mr. Fauchet yesterday; and endeavoured to satisfy him of the difficulty, and, as I conceived, the impracticability of advancing the million of Dollars, which he requested. He described his distress, produced by the various draughts of the French Consuls, with great force, and in strong colours; and begged, that he might be permitted to state it on paper. This of...
The Secretary of State has it in charge from the President of the United States, to request the attendance of the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, and the Attorney General, at his Room on Monday next 11. o’Clock. The following, among other subjects, will be submitted. 1. Whether it be expedient to send, to England with the complaints of spoliation, some agent to manage them,...
The Secretary of State has the honor of informing the Secretaries of the Treasury and of war and the attorney general, that the President is desirous, that they would take into consideration the Resolutions lately passed by the Inhabitants of Kentucky, and the intelligence lately received from Mr. Seagrove relative to the affairs in Georgia. The President wishes to see the Gentlemen at his...
The Secretary of State has the honor of informing the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, and the Attorney General of the United States, that he has this day received a Convention bearing date the 27th. of March 1794 between Denmark and Sweden for the maintenance of the rights of neutral navigation. It is proper to notify the Gentlemen, that Mr. Jay is instructed, if he should...
The President wishes your opinion, as to the step, proper to be taken, upon the inclosed address. To send to congress, what the President thinks unfit for himself, will be unkindly received; being uncivil in itself. To acknowledge the body, as such, is in every view inadmissible. So that the question seems to turn upon this; whether it be better to treat the paper with unqualiffied and silent...
The Secretary of State has the honor of inclosing for the consideration of the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War and the Attorney General of the United States, the papers in the case of the British Ship William, a prize to a French vessel of war. The Secretary of State is of opinion, that it is not proved, that she was taken within the protection of our Coasts, and therefore that she...
The Secretary of State has the honor of conveying to the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War, and the Attorney General the wish of the President, that instead of a meeting at his house at 12 oClock on Monday next the opinions upon the two points suggested in a note of this morning should be committed to writing, and sent to the President by that time. LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the...
The Secretary of State has the honor of informing the Secretaries of the Treasury and of war and the Attorney General, that subscriptions have been carried on in Boston and Norfolk, and the monies, arising therefrom have been tendered to the President for the relief of the Unhappy Citizens of the United States now in captivity in Algiers. Sometime ago the Citizens of Philadelphia were in...
E. Randolph with respects to Mr Fauchet informs him, that he shall by the post of tomorrow take proper measures in the case of Mr Juteau to obtain all its particulars, and will communicate the result to Mr Fauchet. Copy, DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. The copyist wrote "July."
We have just received intelligence, that the Ship sometimes called Vanstabel, at others Chickamogga, and at others Isaac, is at Reedy Island, in the River Delaware. The circumstances of this vessel have for some time past attracted the attention, and excited much dissatisfaction in the Government; but it was expected, that she had long ago been divested of the Character, which was offensive to...
I do myself the honor of enclosing to you the determination of the President of the United States, as to the sailing of the vessels of War of any of the belligerent Nations from the United States. The rule being reasonable in itself, and conformable to the law of nations, is now transmitted to you, with a hope, that you will cause it to be promulgated among the Ships of War, whether public or...
I do myself the honor of informing you that the French Ship L’Orient of Bengal now lying in the port of Philadelphia attracts the attention omit these words (and excites the suspicion) of the Executive. It is represented that on her arrival she was a private ship the property of the French East India company and though armed was without a public Commission (had a complete military equipment...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, giving information of the dismission of the prosecution against Mr Juteau. Mr Fauchet, however, is exceedingly dissatisfied with the manner in which this business was conducted. He says, that he would have preferred, that the trial should go on, to the compulsion of Mr Juteau to appear at the bar. It is very certain, that the wish of the...
The attorney-general of the United States does himself the honor of replying to the questions, propounded by the secretary of the Treasury of the United States, in his letter of the 12th of October 1791, as follows. 1st.   The Commissioners, appointed in pursuance of the act, incorporating the bank of the United States, have no power, as such, to superintend the election of directors, or to...
E. Randolph, with compliments to Coll. Hamilton, incloses to him a letter from Mr. Hammond requesting the passport. E. R. has written to him, that by applying to Col. H. the passport will be obtained. LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the Department of State, Vol. 6, January 2–June 26, 1794, National Archives. On March 29, 1794, George Hammond, British Minister Plenipotentiary to the United...