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    • Randolph, Edmund
    • Randolph, Edmund
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    • Hamilton, Alexander

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Documents filtered by: Author="Randolph, Edmund" AND Author="Randolph, Edmund" AND Recipient="Hamilton, Alexander"
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I beg leave to answer a question which you propounded to me some time ago. Several quarter Masters and other public officers, some with salaries, others with Commissions, have received public Money to disburse for public use. Of this money they were robbed, notwithstanding reasonable care on their part. Are they entitled to an allowance for the sums lost; or must their relief depend on...
In answer to your Official letter of the 19th. of February last I beg leave to observe: that the supplies and services therein mentioned as having been furnished and rendered by individuals for the use of the Public, were undoubtedly from the nature of Contracts, originally debits against the United States: that the Officers who granted the Certificates, debentures or other acknowledgments for...
The Attorney General of the United States does himself the honor of replying to the questions propounded to him by the Secretary of the Treasury, as follows: ☞ 1st. To the statement in the letter of February, 12th: 1791. It does not appear whether the deceased Administrix be interested personally in the estate of her deceased husband. If she were so, although the whole legal right vested in...
In answering your communication of the 10th. of december last, I cannot do better, than acknowledge my conviction from the reasoning of Mr. Dayton. That reasoning being in your possession, I beg leave to refer to it, as the groundwork of my opinion, that military rights to land ought to be received on account of his that is Judge Symmes’s contract in the manner, contended for by him. I have...
In the opinion, given by Mr. Bradford and Mr. Ingersoll, I find the case of Mr. Robert Buchanan to be accurately stated; but after paying a respectful attention to the sentiments of those gentlemen, I am compelled to say, that I differ in the conclusion drawn from that statement: for I cannot agree, that any interest is to be received upon ⟨the⟩ certificate for the year 1791. I acknowledge...
I have done myself the honor of calling at your house and office, with a view to say a word to you, on the claim, which the holders of a certain description of certificates have set up. But being disappointed in meeting you, I beg leave to give you the result of my reflections on that subject. What degree of obligation lies upon the United States to gratify them, is at this time immaterial,...
The attorney-general of the United States does himself the honor of replying to the questions, propounded by the secretary of the Treasury of the United States, in his letter of the 12th of October 1791, as follows. 1st.   The Commissioners, appointed in pursuance of the act, incorporating the bank of the United States, have no power, as such, to superintend the election of directors, or to...
I do myself the honor of answering your letter of the 2d. instant upon the subject of the North Carolina certificates. The 13th. section of the funding act admits, that subscriptions may be made to the loan payable in the principal and interest of the certificates or notes which, prior to a certain day, were issued by the respective states as acknowledgments or evidences of debts, by them...
In our conversation Yesterday we reduced the substance of your favor of the 7 Instant to this question: Whether you ought, under any modification, to suspend the payment of Interest to a State, which is intitled under the 17th. section of the act “making provision for the debt of the United states,” to receive interest to the amount of the nonsubscribed deficiency; In trust for the...
I understand from your communication of the 2d instant, that you do not wish my opinion upon any other point, than that which seems to have produced a schism between the Gentlemen of the NewYork and Virginia bar. The former are interpreted to declare, that sixty Cents and no more are demandable by the Collectors for every entry of an inward Cargo directed to be made in conformity with the...