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Documents filtered by: Author="Randolph, Edmund" AND Author="Randolph, Edmund" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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RC (Harvard College Library: Dearborn Papers). Addressed in the hand of a clerk, probably George Hay, “To James Madison. Sept 13th: 1783,” and almost certainly enclosed by Randolph in his longer letter of the same date to JM ( q.v. ). If your attention to congressional business, and your cramped situation will allow you to shew civilities to a new acquaintance, I must consign Mr. Francis...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned, but in Randolph’s hand. Cover addressed by him to “The honble James Madison jr. esq of Congress Princeton.” Docketed by JM, “Sepr. 13. 1783 E.R.” The bracketed letters are those excised from the manuscript by an overly close cropping, especially along the right margin of the second folio. Norfolk and its neighbourhood are I fear, doomed to perpetual...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover missing. Docketed by JM, “Randolph. Edmd. Jany. 27. 1784.” Altho’ your return from congress has brought you nearer in point of distance, it has fixed a wider gulph between us in point of communication by letter. But I do not mean to suffer the danger of miscarrage, to which even a private opportunity is exposed, whensoever any thing, worthy of notice, occurs....
Your friendly overture of a correspondence; altho’ written on the 31st. Ulto. , did not reach me before the last evening. I pledge myself for furnishing all the intelligence, which the barrenness of this place can supply, fit for your attention. But for a late occurrence, the executive would languish for employment. A Mr. Geo. Hancock, a citizen of this commonwealth, assaulted and beat a Mr....
Your favor of the 10th instant, which I this day received, is not the first information concerning Lord Tankerville’s power of attorney. I was written to by Lady Tankerville and his Lordship, as early as November last: and immediately desired Colo. Hooe to state to me the particulars of this new office. He answered me, that he was ignorant of the duty, expected from us, and must remain so,...
I have forborne to answer your late letter on the subject of the petitions, until I took the steps, which the case seemed to recommend. It is a point, on which the lawyers themselves are divided, whether a new petition can be now brought for a forfeiture before the 29th of Sepr 1775. Altho’ I should not conceive such a petition very formidable, yet as there is a doubt, capable of being...
I have been forbidden by an unusual sensation in my head for some time past, to write a line, which the duties of my profession did not extort from me. This circumstance alone has hitherto prevented an answer to your last favor. The elections for this year have proved the readiness of the citizens to incorporate the military with the civil. I have heard of the success of seven military...
Inclosed you will receive a letter, which fell into my hands from a gentleman, lately arrived from England. Colo. Bassett is here, and I shall prepare a deed to be executed for the whole of the lands, adjudged to him against you. I was not satisfied, that the proof, which you sent me of improvements, was agreeable to law, tho’ the fact would certainly have acquitted some of the land: and...
Your mission to Europe reached us the day before yesterday, and made me doubt whether you will not have sailed before my answer to your friendly letter by the last post shall get to hand. I had begun to transcribe for you the manuscript defence of our claim to western territory. I shall pursue the task, and forward it by some opportunity across the Atlantic. It is probable, that you will have...
Inclosed is the rough draught of a deed, prepared to be executed by Colo. Bassett. I send it to you for your satisfaction, with an assurance that I shall not fail to accomplish the business at the next general court. I am Dear Sir with the greatest truth yr obliged and affte friend ALS , ViMtvL . See Randolph to GW, 15 May 1784 , and the references in note 2 of that document . See also...