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Documents filtered by: Author="Randolph, Edmund" AND Author="Knox, Henry" AND Author="Hamilton, Alexander"
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Feb. 25. 1793. The President desires the opinions of the heads of the three departments and of the Attorney General on the following question, to wit. Mr. Ternant having applied for money equivalent to three millions of livres to be furnished on account of our debt to France at the request of the Executive of that country, which sum is to be laid out in provisions within the US. to be sent to...
The President having required the attendance of the heads of the three departments and of the Attorney general at his house on Monday the 25th. of Feb. 1793. the following questions were proposed and answers given. 1. The Governor of Canada having refused to let us obtain provisions from that province or to pass them along the water communication to the place of treaty with the Indians, and...
It is our opinion, 1. that the President ought to take the oath in public. 2. that the time be on Monday next at 12 o’clock in the forenoon. 3. that the place be the Senate-chamber. 4. that the Marshal of the district inform the Vice-President, that the Senate-chamber, being the usual place of the president’s public acts, is supposed to be the best place for taking the oath; and that it is...
The President communicated to the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War and the Attorney General of the United States, a letter from William S. Smith Esqr. of the 28th of February past, to the Secretary of the Treasury, with sundry Papers—No. I. II. III & IV. relating to a negotiation for changing the form of the debt to France; and required their opinion what...
That an Agent be sent to the Choctaw nation to endeavor secretly to engage them to support the Chickasaws in their present war with the Creeks, giving them for that purpose arms and ammunition sufficient: and that it be kept in view that if we settle our differences amicably with the Creeks, we at the same time mediate effectually the peace of the Chickasaws & Choctaws, so as to rescue the...
At meetings of the heads of departments & the Attorney General at the President’s on the 1st. & 2d. of Aug. 1793. On a review of the whole of mr Genet’s correspondence & conduct, it was unanimously agreed that a letter should be written to the Minister of the US. at Paris, stating the same to him, resuming the points of difference which had arisen between the government of the US. & mr Genet,...
At a meeting of the Heads of departments & Attorney General at the President’s on the 31st. day of Aug. 1793. A letter from mr Gore to mr Lear, dated Boston Aug. 24. was read, stating that the Roland, a privateer fitted out at Boston & furnished with a commission under the government of France, had sent a prize into that port, which being arrested by the Marshal of the district by process from...
At sundry meetings of the heads of departments & attorney general from the 1st. to the 21st. of Nov. 1793. at the President’s several matters were agreed upon as stated in the following letters from the Secretary of state. to wit. Nov. 8. Circular letter to the representatives of France, Gr. Brit. Spain & the U. Netherlands, fixing provisonily the extent of our jurisdiction into the sea at a...
At a meeting of the heads of departments & Atty genl. at the President’s on the 7th. of Dec. 1793. Mr. Genet’s ltre of Dec. 3. questioning the right of requiring the address of Consular commissions to the President was read. It is the opinion that the address may be either to the US. or to the President of the US. but that one of these should be insisted on. A letter from James King was read,...
At a meeting of the heads of departments at the President’s, on the fourteenth day of January 1794. It was propounded by the President, whether in consideration of the eminent services of M. de la Fayette, to the U. S. and his present sufferings, it be not adviseable for the President, in a private , and unofficial character, to address to the King of Prussia a letter, requesting his release...