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I duly recd. your letter of the 17th ulto. in answer to mine of the 7th; informing me that you had relinquished the presidency of the Albemarle Agricultural Society, & had other demands on your time, and other reading tasks in which you were in arrears, which abridged your reading works on husbandry. I shall nevertheless continue to address to you my letters in relation to the improving of our...
As you are the President of an Agricultural Society, you doubtless read some Agricultural papers, and among them, the “American Farmer,” a paper peculiarly adapted to the husbandry of the Middle States. In that you will have seen the writings of Mr. John Hare Powel, in three numbers, called a “Reply to Colonel Pickering on Native Cattle.” On that subject I wrote four letters, first published...
I duly received, and am greatly obliged by your interesting letter of the 6th in answer to mine of the 2d inst. Should any other questions occur on of importance enough to authorize me to interrupt your repose, I shall use the liberty you allow me, to propose them. In recurring to the early opposition to British taxation of the Colonies, you some two or three years since mentioned your own...
As no act of the Congress of the Thirteen United American Colonies was so distinguished as that by which their Independence of Great Britain was declared, the most particular history of that transaction will probably be sought for; not merely as an interesting curiosity, but to do substantial justice to the abilities and energy of the leaders in that great measure. By the public journals it...
You will recollect that Gibbon, in his history of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, treats of the Christian Religion; and thus he assigns five secondary causes of its prevalence, & final victory over the established religions of the earth. Among these, one was “the miraculous powers ascribed to the primitive church.” It seems plain that Gibbon considered the miracles ascribed to Christ...
I have repeatedly applied to the secretary of the navy to obtain the discharge of a minor of the name of Chase, whose father, Aquila Chase, of Massachusetts, demands his release, & has furnished the requisite evidence of his being a minor; but am not informed that the discharge has been directed. The last time I called at the Navy Office, Mr. Jones being absent, his chief clerk promised to...
The two nominations of an associate judge of the supreme court to fill the seat vacated by the death of Judge Cushing, having failed; will you permit me to bring to your recollection a man whom you knew in the House of Representatives, in Philadelphia—Jeremiah Smith of New Hampshire? He is a federalist; but one of great distinction as a lawyer; at the same time, amiable, moderate &...
I have just received from your office a letter covering a copy of one dated the 10th instant from the French Minister, relative to the claims of the owners of the vessels detained by the Ship of War L’Eole; by which they are referred to the French Consul at Baltimore to obtain the adjustment of those claims. Having no documents in my possession, I must request you to send me those which were...
Mr. Pickering is requested by Major Burnham to present the inclosed bill to Mr. Jefferson, for the Corn-Sheller , and to receive the amount: For that purpose, Mr. P. has signed the receipt. —Mr. P. is informed by Major Burnham that he has sent a letter of advice to Mr. Jefferson. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Mr. Pickering presents his compliments to Mr. Jefferson, and thanks him for the ear of Osage corn. On chewing two or three kernels, Mr. Pickering finds the corn of precisely the same texture, and nearly insipid taste, with what in Pennsylvania is called flour-corn ; only the latter grows into a much larger ear than the present sample of Osage corn; but the latter may perhaps ripen earlier. If...
Accustomed to act as a sense of duty urges; as most would think, with too little regard to personal consequences: particularly, having sometimes expressed my sentiments to public and to private men, on subjects of public moment, or of their individual interest, at the hazard of giving them offence: and impelled by the dangers of a measure of great national concern , the interdiction of all...
Mr. Pickering begs leave to inform Mr. Jefferson, that on returning yesterday to his lodgings, he was told by Mr. Davenport, who had enquired for it, that Knight’s treatise on the culture of the apple & pear was not to be purchased in the city of New-York. If therefore Mr. Jefferson wishes either to read it again, or to recommend the printing of an American edition, Mr. Pickering will, with...
Agreeably to the conversation of last Saturday, Colo. Pickering presents for Mr. Jefferson’s perusal, Knight’s treatise on the culture of the Apple & Pear, and on the making of Cider & Perry; persuaded that he will derive some useful information from his facts and practical details, and much pleasure from his ingenious theories. The interesting fact (however to be accounted for) that the old...
Mr. Pickering presents his respects to the President, and returns the copy of Crozat’s grant from Louis XIV. with his thanks. The grant is not what Mr. P. supposed, of the province of Louisiana, but a monopoly of its commerce , for 15 years; with some specific property therein, the value of which, and its tenure, were to depend on his labour and expence in cultivation and improvement. But in...
Mr. Pickering has the honour to return to the President his memoir on the northern boundary of Louisiana. A close examination of the subject since, has convinced Mr. Pickering that the idea he took the liberty to suggest to the President, which is the basis of the memoir, and which arose in Mr. Pickering’s mind on the perusal of Mr. Hutchins’s observations on the treaty of Utrecht, is...
Mr. Pickering presents his respects to the President of the United States, and submits to his consideration the inclosed inquiry concerning the Northern boundaries of Canada & Louisiana. If Mr. Pickering does not extremely mistake the facts, and their necessary consequences, all dispute with Great-Britain concerning boundaries, will be forever closed, by a ratification and execution of the...
An inquiry concerning the Northern Boundaries of Canada & Louisiana  By the tenth article of the treaty of Utrecht, (in 1713) Great Britain and France agreed as follows  France shall restore to Great Britain “the bay and streights of Hudson, together with all lands, seas, sea coasts, rivers and places situate in the said bay and streights, and which belong thereunto, no tracts of land or of...
Mr. Pickering presents his respects to the President, and requests the loan of Crozat’s grant of Louisiana from Lewis XIV. Mr. P. acknowledges the receipt of the President’s observations on the northern boundaries of the U. States & Louisiana; and if any further examination of the subject should present a different view of it, to Mr. Pickering, he will take the liberty to offer the same to the...
I hoped to have seen you on my way hither; but the distance at which you were from the place of crossing the Hudson, & my engagements with my travelling companions, prevented. I duly received your letter of Septr. 16th. relative to the proposition you made in the General Convention. It was obvious, that those, with the propositions of others, were presented for consideration and discussion, to...
The assertion of the Jacobins, that you are an aristocrat & a Monarchist, is not new: But at a late meeting of the sect in this town, one of their leaders declared “That General Hamilton proposed (&, it was understood, advocated) in the general Convention, That the President of the United States, and the Senators, should be chosen for life: That this was intended as an introduction to...
13 June 1801, Easton, Pennsylvania. Forwards a packet of papers pertaining to the claims of the heirs of a French officer who served in the Revolution, Jean-Baptiste de Gouvion. Money is due them from the U.S., but he has advised the heirs not to permit the funds to go to a French government official; Pickering’s recollection is that he suggested the remittance be made through bankers in...
Mr Joseph Dennie, now of Philadelphia, has more than once observed to me, that he had never the happiness of being known to you. He repeated the observation, as I lately passed thro’ that city. And manifesting an earnest desire to be introduced, requested me to write to you for that purpose. Of Mr Dennie’s genius and literary talents, you will judge from his writings. These have appeared...
When in Philadelphia, last winter, Mr. James Yard of that city, reminded me of an assurance given to Edward Stevens Esqr. Consul General for St. Domingo, that he should be indemnified for becoming bail for Mr. Bunel, the Agent of General Toussaint . The facts were these. After General Toussaint took upon himself the administration of the Government of St. Domingo, being desirous of renewing...
After an absence of four months in the Woods I returned hither on the evening of the 10th instant; and this is the first opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 13th ult. A few days before I left the Woods , I received from a friend in Philadelphia, your pamphlet concerning the conduct and character of President Adams. You say the press teams with replies. I have yet...
I have at this instant received your letter without date, but stamped at the postoffice in NYork May 14. I intended to have done precisely what you suggest, respecting Mr Adams journal &c. (very little of which I had ever read) but there was not time. Last saturday morning I received a summons to resign , and a desire that I would myself name the day. But I did not incline to accept this...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States, letters and voluminous documents relative to calumnies formed and propagated in St. Domingo, chiefly by Jacob Mayer, the American Consul at Cape Francois, against Doctor Edward Stevens the Consul General; connected with which are said Mayer’s base insinuations and open slanders against the President of the...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter dated last Saturday, stating that “as you perceive a necessity of introducing a change in the administration of the Office of State, you think it proper to make this communication of it to the present Secretary of State, that he may have an opportunity of resigning, if he chooses:” and that “you would wish the day on which his resignation is to...
The inclosed letter dated February 26. 1800, from Jacob Mayer, Consul of the United States at Cape Francais, should have accompanied the Secretary of State’s report made to the President this morning, relative to the Consul General, Doctor Stevens, and the Consul Mayer. The Secretary stated that he had not received from the Consul Mayer an answer to his (the Secretary’s) letter of the 18th of...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States a letter from Wm. H Harrison Esqr. represented in Congress, from the N. Western Territory, such persons as have occurred to him as best qualified for the appointments of General Officers for that Territory. as Mr. Harrison is himself a Candidate for the office of Major General of the Hamilton Division of...
We have considered the question of renewing the commercial intercourse of the United States with the ports and places in the island of Hispaniola, from Montechristi, on the north, round by the east end thereof, as far as Jacmel, on the south, inclusively; and respectfully submit, to the President of the United States, our opinion, That it is expedient, and for the interest of the United...
The Secretary of State has the honor to inclose Mr. Rawles’ resignation of the office of Attorney of the United States for the district of Pennsylvania . MHi : Adams Papers.
[ Philadelphia, April 25, 1800. Pickering’s endorsement on Hamilton’s letter to him dated April 24–25, 1800 , reads: “answd. 25th.” Letter not found. ]
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President sundry recommendations of Joseph Forman of Baltimore to be appointed a Consul in France. Mr. Lloyd, Senator from Maryland, knowing that the Consulate of Rotterdam is vacant, by the death of John Baeldemaker, informs that that place would be accepted my Mr. Forman, and solicited that the nomination might be made. MHi : Adams Papers.
On the petition of David Steward & other respectable citizens of Baltimore, praying the President to order a nolle presequi in the case of Captain Levin Jones, late master of the American Brigantine called the David Stewart, who has been indicted for the crime of murder committed, as alledged on the body of William Davis one of his crew, on the high seas. The Secretary of State, in obedience...
We have had the honour in obedience to your commands maturely to consider the papers and subject referred to us in your letter dated 29 January Ultimo, and the law of Tennessee passed the 26. October 1799 and a letter from the Governor of the said State to William Cocke and Joseph Anderson Senators and William Charles Cole Claiborne Representative of the State of Tennessee in the Congress of...
The Secretary has the honor to lay before the President 1. Mr. Liston’s note of Feby. 2. 1800 with papers referred to relative to the rescue of three American Vessels from the hands of the British captors, and for the restoration of which he is instructed by his government to apply. 2. Mr. Liston’s note of the 4th of February, together with his project of a treaty for the reciprocal delivery...
The Secretary of State has the honour to lay before the President the petition of Robert Fisher of Harford County, Maryland, committed to gaol in Baltimore for theft committed in the Island of Cuba , praying a Nolle prosequi may be entered. Governor Howard has just been here with the father of the young man who anxiously waits your decision. On the enquiries of the Secretary, two letters were...
The Secretary of State begs leave to inform the President of the United States, that the Georgia Commissioners are desirous of meeting those appointed by the United States, without delay, on the subject of the claims of Territory. As Mr. Sitgreaves is gone for London, the Secretary respectfully proposes that another Commissioner should be appointed in his place; and submits whether it would...
The Secretary of State has prepared, as directed, and now respectfully submits to the President of the United States, copies of the papers, which probably were contemplated by the House of Representatives, in their resolve of the 4th. instant: Altho’ no requisition, as the resolve supposes, has ever been received, nor any communication made to the Judge of the District Court of South Carolina,...
Not knowing the President’s determination respecting the Consulate of Madeira, the Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President a letter of the 24th instant, just received, from some respectable citizens, recommending Mr. Marien Lamar for Consul in that island. Mr. Lamar is the nephew of the late Henry Hill Esqr. of Philadelphia, & has resided some time at Madeira, in Mr. Hill’s...
I have the honor to lay before you the letters I have prepared for Tunis and Tripoli. With the latter every thing appears to be adjusted. The Bey of Tunis demands a present of Jewels, the amount about 40,000 dollars. In his letter to you he persists in the demand. Upon a second reading and deliberate examination of Mr. Eaton’s communications, the present appears to me indispensable: our peace...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States a statement of the claims of American Citizens adjusted by the board of Commissioners under the 21st. article of our treaty with Spain; and a letter from Matthew Clarkson Esquire, the commissioner on the part of the United States, dated the 2d. instant, informing that the commission terminated on the 31st. of...
The Secretary of State respectfully proposes to the President of the United States, that there be allowed to Samuel Sitgreaves, going to London on the business of the sixth article of the treaty, of amity &c. with Great Britain, A continuation of his salary as one of the Commissioners under that article; And the expences which shall be necessarily incurred for his voyage to and from London,...
The Secretary of State has the honour to inform the President, that he received Mr. Pintard’s papers here inclosed, from Mr. Wolcott—read & handed them to Mr. McHenry—& has this moment received them back from Mr. Stoddert. It appears that Mr. Pintard himself first gave them to Mr Lee. The Secretary of State sees no remark upon them from any of the gentlemen; nor has he any to make himself. MHi...
Agreeably to your direction the papers which were laid before you respecting John Marsden Pintard Esqr. Consul of the United States for the Island of Madeira, including his own communications to you, have been committed to the Heads of Departments and Attorney General for their examination and consideration: and their opinions thereon I presume will be submitted to you immediately: by own I...
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 3 Dec. 1799. GW’s letter of 24 Nov. to Pickering is docketed by Pickering, “answd Decr 3d.”
Agreeably to the President’s direction, the Secretary of State respectfully offers the following notices of matters appearing to him proper to be communicated to Congress, at the opening of their approaching session. “It appearing probable; from the information I had received, that our commercial intercourse with some ports of the Island of St. Domingo might safely be renewed: Conformably to...
I received your letter of last evening; & have written to Mr. King on the subject of a Danish Consul—The letter to go by the British packet, which will not sail till next Saturday. To-day I received a letter from Mr. Winchester, acknowledging the receipt of your commission, constituting him Judge of the Maryland District. He concludes—“Be pleased, sir, to communicate to the President my...
By the inclosed letter of July 30 from Mr. King, it seems that the King of Denmark intends to name a Consul to reside in the United States; but desires first to know whether it will be agreeable to the American Government. With your permission I will communicate to Mr. King the requested assurance that such an appointment will meet your approbation. The inclosed letter of Sept. 6th from...
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 5 Nov. 1799. GW wrote Pickering on 24 Nov. : “Your favour of the 5th instant came to hand in due course.”