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your favour of this date is just handed to me. The axes are all ground & part helved; the residue are helving. I have given directions to have grindstones fixed; and will attend to the means of transportation, agreeable to his Excellency’s wishes. I am yr most obedt servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Agreeably to the General orders already issued the troops are getting the wood destined for West point, to the different landings, and on board the Vessels procured for its transportation: But if nothing more be done, the business will not be finished before winter. It was with the most extreme difficulty that any vessels were engaged on the terms I could offer. a promise of future payment,...
Since your Excellency spoke to me yesterday relative to the movement of the army,I have more maturely considered of the means of effecting that movement, and the time requisite for collecting the horses and oxen to Verplank’s Point. In consequence of the orders given the 23d instant, I expect all the public horses and oxen on the west side of the river will have crossed over at Newburgh, one...
I have more than once conversed with you on the subject of the army’s moving below; and expressed my wishes, prompted by divers reasons, that such a movement might not take place. But perhaps it may be proper to commit those reasons, stating them more particularly, to writing. 1. The want of forage. The General has himself seen that the horses and oxen cannot subsist, unless turned out to...
Agreeably to your Excellency’s directions, being accompanied by Colo. Swift, Colo. H. Jackson and Colo. Cobb, I have viewed divers parts of the Highlands, and the wood lands in the vicinity of New-Windsor and Newburgh, to find places adapted to the hutting of troops. About a mile on this side of the huts late of the 3d Massachusetts brigade, on the right of the road leading to them, after...
The left wing of the army, commencing its march at seven o’clock to morrow morning, will proceed by the Continental Village to Nelson’s Point, where on Sunday boats will be in readiness to carry the troops to West Point; from whence they will march over Butter Hill in the road leading to Murderer’s Creek. On their descent from the Hill, the quarter masters of brigades will join and conduct...
To render it practicable to support the horses indispensably necessary with the army, I beg leave to suggest the expediency of sending to a distance in the Country the surplus riding horses without delay. My ability to provide forage is not increased, but lessened, by the non-payment of the bills of exchange put into my hand for that among other purposes. I submit to your Excellency’s...
Capt. Walker has shewn me a letter of this date from Genl Gates to your Excellency, representing that quarters are not yet provided for him. It is very true, yet I have spared no pains to provide for him. This day one of my assistants rode twenty miles from house to house, to find quarters for the director of the Hospital that he might quit Ellisons, but return’d without success. All former...
Capt. Palmer, an old seaman, has examined Murderers Creek to find a place suitable for hauling up the batteaux for the winter, and can find none. Afterward he examined the shore from thence to two miles above Newburgh, but discovered no place adequate to the reception of more than thirty boats together. Yesterday I went myself with him to view Murderers Creek and all the other places he had...
The inclosed letter I received last evening. Your Excellency will readily judge I cannot avoid requesting leave of absence to see and remain with Mrs Pickering while she remains dangerously sick. If you are pleased to indulge me, I shall leave Newburgh early to-morrow morning. The mean time will be taken up in writing the necessary orders for conducting the different branches in the department...
Last evening I received your Excellency’s letter of the 14th with its two inclosures. Mrs Washington is not yet arrived here, and I have therefore put the letter to Mr Lund Washington into the Post Office, to be sent off with the mail next Tuesday, if in the interim he should not arrive. No assistance which she may need & in my power to yield shall be wanting to Mrs Washington while here, or...
FC ( NA : War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records, Vol. 85, fol. 295–96). Addressed to “The Delegates in Congress from Virginia.” The main part of the letter, including the address and signature, is in the hand of a clerk. The Bearer with his family are just arrived from newburgh, to which place they came from Canada where they have been Prisoners about two years. Just before I...
Your Excellency had but just left my quarters, this evening, when a deputy sheriff of Ulster arrested me. He shewed me a writ of which I beg leave to inclose a copy. To prevent any injury to the public, by taking me from my office, I gave bail; and have wrote to an attorney to defend the suit. I thought it my duty to apprize your Excellency of this event. The plaintiff is a Melancton L....
I received yesterday your Excellency’s letter of the 27th inst. directing the estimates for the ensuing campaign to be prepared. They shall be made out with all possible expedition & laid before you. I have the honour to be with the greatest respect, your Excellency’s most obedt servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
To-day major Campbell handed me a letter from General Knox relative to the collecting of timber for bomb proofs in the four redoubts back of West-Point. I beg leave to inclose a copy of it, and of my answer. In reading Genl Knox’s letter, two things very naturally occurred: One, That if all the other works so materially depended on those redoubts, and they were not tenable for half an hour,...
The inclosed estimate is calculated on the supposition that the army under your Excellency’s command, will be composed of 9 major generals 10 brigadiers 30 regiments of 1 Hazens infantry, of 500 2 N. Hampshire men each exclusive 8 Massachusetts of officers, viz. 1 Rhode Island 3 Connecticut
The conductor whom I sent to Albany with blankets for Colo. Willet’s regiment is returned. He arrived there the 4th before sunset; and has delivered the blankets to Colo. Willet, together with ten guineas which I sent to prevent any little difficulties and delays, which even so small a sum of money might obviate. He has brought no letters for your Excellency. I am, very respectfully, Sir, Your...
I have received from my Counsel in Woolsey’s action, a special bail piece, which he says I with my bail must acknowledge before Judge Barber of Wallkill. I have proposed to go to-morrow and return by evening, if your Excellency has no commands to prevent it. I have been some time anxiously waiting for money from Philadelphia, to enable me to complete the payment of debts for which I am daily...
By the Bills brought in to my office in some cases, I find very large quantities of wood burnt by officers not hutted with the troops, quantities quite disproportioned to the allowances in Philadelphia, as formerly regulated at the War Office. The latter, it is true, are evidently insufficient for this climate & the quarters generally occupied. What they are your Excellency will see, if you...
The committee of Congress on the late regulations for the quarter master’s department, on account of the numerous amendments which they appeared to require, reported their total repeal, and a substitution of others in their stead. This kept me in a state of suspense. But no decision having yet taken place, I beg leave, agreeably to the direction of those regulations, to lay before your...
In answer to your favour of this date just handed me, relative to the standards for the army, I have to inform you, that they came to the store at this place in a box with other articles, directed to Mr Frothingham field commissary of military stores, who opened the box & took out some of the articles, but left the standards, saying he would send for them: how ever, there they are yet. This is...
In answer to the questions in your note of this date, you will be pleased to inform the commander in chief. That last May Saml Ogden Esqr. of Booneton contracted to make and deliver 1500 camp kettles in a very short time. From the 6th of July to the 23d of October he had delivered 1205—295 are still due, for which he has been importuned. On the 13th of February his Clerk wrote that they were...
The Brigadiers and commanding officers of Brigades have reconnoitred the environs of the cantonments, but find no place sufficient, in its present condition, for the manoeuvring of a large body of troops, indeed of any number exceeding a brigade. Capt. Nichols’s plantation, with the land eastward of it, towards Murderer’s creek, is spacious enough; but a growth of young wood covering many...
You was pleased to ask my opinion of the military establishments proper to be adopted by the United States, on the conclusion of the war. As it is a subject of the first consequence, I have considered it with attention: and now submit to your Excellency my thoughts upon it. In order to form a just judgment of the military institution necessary for the safety of a State, we must consider the...
On the receipt of your Excellency’s letter of the 6th instant relative to the measures necessary for taking possession of the posts on the frontiers, I considered the nature of the service, and made such inquiries as appeared necessary to enable me to form an estimate of the expense. The next day I waited on Mr Morris, who desired me particularly to state my ideas on the subject. These I laid...
It is now time to deposit at West-Point as much wood as will be necessary for the use of the garrison the ensuing winter. If it be practicable to determine, at this time, what shall be the strength of the garrison, and the number and ranks of the officers, I will lay in forage, as well as wood, in proportion, as soon as I am favoured with your Excellency’s decision thereon. The wood I propose...
The chain at West-Point has already suffered considerably by the rust, and will be daily growing worse. If it is to be kept for future use, it cannot too soon be housed; and in this case it is said it may be preserved from rust by painting. If it is not necessary to keep it, the sooner it is sold the better. It would probably fetch about two thirds the price of bar iron. The chain contains...
I was last evening honoured with your two letters of the 8th. Measures were taking to supply the great article of wood, to the amount of five hundred cords, in addition to the quantity first proposed; in consequence of a late letter from your Excellency to general Knox; from which it was thought not improbable that a larger garrison than five hundred men must be provided for. Those measures...
I have been honoured with your letter of the 10th desiring me to give furloughs to such officers in my department as were not necessary for the troops remaining in service; agreeably to an act of Congress of the 26th ultimo, which you was pleased to inclose. I beg leave to inform your Excellency, that when the men inlisted for the war were furloughed last June, & the brigades in consequence...
We, the Officers of the part of the Army remaining on the banks of the Hudson, have received Your Excellency’s serious and farewel address to the Armies of the United States. We beg your acceptance of our unfeigned thanks for the communication, and your affectionate assurances of inviolable attatchment and friendship. If your attempts to ensure to the Armies the just, the promised rewards of...
The Officers of the part of the Army who agreed on the inclosed address, having committed to us the honor of presenting it. With great pleasure we now offer to your Excellency this testimony of their affectionate attachment & respect. We have the honor to be, with perfect consideration, sir, your Excellency’s most obedient and most humble servants, DLC : Papers of George Washington.
As I may not have another opportunity, I beg leave now to present to your Excellency the following questions & to be favoured with your answers or advice for my government. l. Whether any batteaux, & if any what number must be provided for the frontier service; and at what places, & by what time in the Spring, they must be ready? 2. For what number of troops, destined for the frontier service,...
I beg leave to trouble you with the inclosed letter to Miss Elizabeth White in London, the only sister of my wife. When her father, captain Benjamin White of Boston, brought his family thither, he left his daughter Elizabeth, then a child of seven or eight years old, in London, with a friend of his, a schoolmaster, for her education. In a few years her mother died, and soon after her father...
No opportunity having presented during the winter, of sending your barge to Potowmack; when last in New York I left fresh directions to find a conveyance by the first vessel bound to Alexandria. I have this moment received advice that such a conveyance is engaged. Captain Brothes has agreed to deliver the barge at Alexandria, to colonel Fitzgerald, for whom I left a letter, requesting him to...
I was last week honoured with your letter of the 9th instant, inclosing a letter from the governour of Massachusetts relative to the hire of the ox-teams raised in that state, to serve with the army in the year 1781; and requesting me to give all the information in my power, respecting the nature and circumstances of the contract mentioned in the letter, and relative to the subject thereof in...
Philadelphia, September 30, 1784. Encloses legal papers to be used by Hamilton in “execution of the will of … John Holt, late of New-York printer deceased.” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. After the war Pickering, a native of Massachusetts, settled in Philadelphia where he became a merchant.
I have recd. a letter of the 6th ult. from Mr. Anspach, stating the necessity of his being furnished with two or three thousand dollars, to pay some arrears due to himself, Mr. Wolfe, Mr. Dill, & a few others who were employed in the late department of the Quarter Master General—that the payment of those arrears, particularly his, Mr. Wolfe’s & Mr. Dill’s will enable them to complete the...
I have this day recd. your letter of the 19th. instant. It is in some sort anticipated by mine of last week. But the inclosed letter to Mr. Peter Anspach is to request him with Mr. Wolfe’s assistance to present you with a statement of the debts intended to have been provided for by the anticipation you mention, & which yet remain unsatisfied. The documents are in his hand. I remarked in my...
Last evening a gentleman called on me to inform me of Mr. Duer’s resignation; and to urge me to apply for the vacant office. Having since reflected on a variety of circumstances which would render the office eligible, I have concluded to make known to you my willingness to take it, if you, who know me perfectly well, think I can give you the aid you would wish for and expect in an assistant....
Conveyances to and from this place rarely offer, which, I suppose, prevented my receiving your favor of May 13th until a few days past. In appointments to public employments, when I had such to make, I am not conscious that personal considerations ever influenced my choice. The same principle determines me to be satisfied, and, if you will allow the expression, to approve of your appointment...
The inclosed letter, I sent at its date from Wyoming by a private hand, in a packet addressed to Mr. Hodgdon to be forwarded to you: but to-day it came to hand, thro’ the post office. I find that Congress have been pleased to grant 40,000 dollars to discharge certain arrears due from my late department. Mr. Anspach has written to me on the subject. He states that the mode of paying the...
Generally speaking, no task could be imposed on me so ungrateful as that of applying for a public office. In the present instance, however, I feel little reluctance in doing it; because I know the application will be duly noticed, and the ultimate decision, whether for or against me, be governed by a just regard to the interests of the United States. By some of my friends I am informed that Mr...
The messenger to the Seneca nation set off this afternoon, with a letter addressed by me to their Sachems Chiefs & Warriors, informing them of my appointment from you to meet them under the authority of the United States; inviting the relations of the deceased Indians to come to Tioga on the 25th of October next; and expressing your desire that the chiefs of the Turtle tribe, & other Great Men...
4 barrels of Country rum 120 gall. @ at 3/. £ 18. 0.0 Provisions for 200 Indians 12 days, including the supplies they must receive when going home, viz.  3200 lbs. of beef @ 3 d. 40. 0.0  32 Cwts flour @ 15/. 24.  .  A silver gorget & other trinkets 10.  .  1 Cwt of tobacco & pipes 2.10.  94.10.0 Provisions & necessaries for T. Pickering, & Colo. Wilson, agent for Pennsylvania, & for the...
In obedience to your orders I held a Conference with the Chiefs &c. of the Seneca nation of Indians at Tioga in this state. About 220 of all ages attended. The day of meeting proposed was the 25th of October: but they did not arrive until the 15th of November. Such delays, I am informed, are common with them; but in the present instance I believe are greatly to be attributed to the...
In obedience to your orders of the 4th of September last, I took the necessary steps for holding a conference with the Logstown Chiefs & warriors of the Seneca Nation of Indians; relative to the murders of two of their people at Pine Creek in Pennsylvania. I wrote to them by the express who at the same time carried a letter from the president of Pennsylvania. In my letter I informed them,...
Having been accidentally detained here longer than I expected, and a little leisure now presenting, I have thought it would not be misapplied in suggesting the means of introducing the art of husbandry, and civilization, among our Indian neighbours. In the treaty with the Creek Indians, I observe provision is made for furnishing them with domestic animals and instruments of husbandry, with a...
I intended to have done myself the honour of waiting on you in person: but a letter may give you less trouble. General Knox informed me that it would be agreeable to you that I should undertake the superintendency of the northern Indians; I mean particularly the Six Nations. I answered, That by the new constitution of Pennsylvania, a Continental appointment was declared to be incompatible with...
As I shall leave town before the papers relative to an intended sale in France of Virginia lands, will be ready to be executed, I have committed the conduct of the business, so far as it respects myself, to my friend Mr. Samuel Hodgdon. He will wait on you with the papers, when completed, to receive such certificate as you shall think proper to give relative to him, Mr. Levi Hollingsworth, and...
(Duplicate) Sir, Philadelphia May 2d 1791. Of the measures pursuing by general Knox, relative to Indian affairs, he doubtless makes to you the necessary communications. In those communications, he may, perhaps, have mentioned my being here, preparatory to my undertaking another mission to the Indians of the Six Nations, for the purpose of confirming the peace and friendship subsisting between...