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By the direction of the President of the United States, I have the honor to inclose a report of the Director of the Mint, suggesting the expediency of some alterations in its establishment, to render it less expensive to the public, and more accommodating to depositors. The report is accompanied with statements of the gold, silver, and copper coins issued from the mint from its commencement to...
The President of the United States has instructed me to communicate, in confidence , to the Senate, the dispatches from Major General Wayne herewith transmitted, dated the 23d of December last, and which were received on the 28th instant. I have the honor to be, / Sir, / with great respect, / Your obedient Servt: DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
The President set out early this morning for Mount Vernon; and soon after, his address to the people of the United States appeared in Claypoole’s news-paper. Of this public declaration, that he will not be a candidate for the office of President, at the ensuing election, I supposed it would be grateful to you to receive the earliest advice. The sentiments he has expressed on the occasion may...
I have the honor to enclose a report on the memorial and petition of William Somarfall & son & John Price, merchants of Charleston, South Carolina, yesterday referred to me by the Senate; and to be with perfect respect, / Sir, / Your most obedient servant DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
By the direction of the President of the United States, I have the honour to present herewith—No. 1. A Statement of the present military force of the United States; No. 2. A report of the measures which have been pursued to obtain proper sites for Arsenals; & No. 3. A report of the measures which have been taken to replenish the magazines with military stores; No. 4. A report of the measures...
I have just received your letter of the 29th. ulto. enquiring about your son Thos. B. Adams at the Hague. On the day of the date of your letter I recd. one from him dated the 28th. of May, from which be pleased to receive the following extract, containing all the information I can give in answer to your enquiries, excepting that the latest letter from your eldest son is dated the 22d. of June...
Portland , in the District of Maine .—The works consist of a fort, a citadel, a battery for ten pieces of cannon, an artillery store, a guard house, an air furnace for heating shot, and a covered way from the fort to the battery. The works are substantially executed, excepting the covered way; to complete this, the earth on the spot being of a bad quality, with the necessary supports of stones...
I inclose the form of the summons by Mr. Jefferson on the former occasion, to the Senators to attend on the 4th of March, and that which would seem to me proper on the present occasion; and by the favour of you to make any alterations that shall appear best; also to fill the blank for the hour of assembling at the Senate Chamber. With great respect / your obt. servt MHi : Adams Papers.
The Senate were pleased, on the 22d. of December, to direct a statement to be laid before them of the military force actually employed against the insurgents in the four Western Counties of Pennsylvania, and an account of the expenditures in that expedition. I have now the honour to inform the Senate, that the expenditures were of various kinds, none of which, except merely for the pay of the...
I mentioned to the President to-day the request of Mr Boudinot that the President would sign 50 diplomas for the New Jersey Cincinnati. The President thought he had signed that number during the late session of Congress. The inclosed papers will show that General Knox was to request it: but I suppose the blanks were never sent to the President. For I now find in this office one bundle...
The Secretary of War prays Mr Dandridge to lay before the President, the reports No. 1. 2. 3 & 4, for the two Houses of Congress. No. 5, on the frigates I shall myself present to the President in perhaps half an hour. No. 6. on the fortifications will require a further examination; but will be ready to-morrow morning. The reports of the Directors of the mint will be ready to send in this...
The Secretary has this moment received Mr Dandridge’s note of this morning, enquiring whether the Secretary had come to any resolution on Govr Mifflin’s letters &c. The answer is in the negative. The Secy received that letter &c. last Saturday evening; and to expedite the departure of Capt. DeButts, was yesterday engaged in draughting the form of a long treaty to aid General Wayne in his...
Colo. Pickering incloses the proceedings from Winchester, with the draught of an answer under the same cover, which Colo. Pickering wrote a number of days since & locked up in a closet at the office of state, where it lay unnoticed till this forenoon. Mr Dandridge will also find inclosed two letters received to day from Mr Monroe, which Mr D. will have the goodness to lay before the President....
The Secretary of War received yesterday the inclosed letter from Mr Kinlock, desiring the extract from Mr Huger’s letter might be laid before the President: you will have the goodness to present it. Captain Kalteisen, who is an old officer now in the corps of artillery & who has been commanding at Fort Johnson, in Charleston Harbour, being in town, wishes very much to pay his respects to the...
Mr Dandridge will be pleased to lay before the President the inclosed letter from Mr Seagrove & the Newspaper which accompanied it. The Secretary of War has had copies made of the Talks of the Creek Chiefs, which he proposes to forward by post next Monday, to Governor Blount. AL , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . Neither the letter from Creek Indian agent James Seagrove nor the accompanying newspaper...
Colo. Pickering incloses to Mr Dandridge a memorandum of the Director of the Mint, of copper he has purchased; for the payment of which Mr Dandridge will be so good as to make out an order in the usual form, & present it to the President for his approbation & signature. 6495 lbs. at 2/4 amount to Dollars 2020 67/100. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s...
Mr Dandridge will be so good as to lay the inclosed papers before the President; they were received to day by the mails. From General Wayne—letter dated Apl 7th with inclosures. From James Seagrove—May 7. 1795. with the proposals of J. C. Nightingale & Co. for the Indian trade. From General Morgan—May 15th The General has been precipitate in forming a corps for six months longer service; &...
The Secretary of War requests Mr Dandridge to lay before the President the inclosed letter of John Parker Hale, lieutenant in the corps of artillerists and engineers, desiring to resign. From the information heretofore received by the Secretary, the resignation is not to be regretted. Mr Hale wishes to leave town to-morrow morning. AL , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . Also on this date John Harris,...
The inclosed draught of a letter to Mr Seagrove touches on points of such importance, I think it necessary to be submitted to the President’s inspection: and as it respects Mr Seagrove’s letter to the President, the submission is indispensable. The letter with its inclosures accompany my answer, as well as Mr Seagrove’s Talk, which has occasioned many of my observations: but which from its...
Mr Dandridge will be pleased to present the inclosed letter from Mr Seagrove to the President. It contains the agreeable intelligence that the Creek Nation are coming in with prisoners & stolen property, and are determined to be at peace with every part of the United States. ALS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . An extract of Creek Indian agent James Seagrove’s letter to GW of 12 May states: “I have...
I have this moment recd from Mr Wolcott the inclosed letter to Mr Adet, which this morning I left at Mr Wolcott’s office for his perusal and remarks. He approves of it entirely. I called at Mr Lee’s in the morning for the like purpose, but he was not at home. However, his letter to me (also inclosed) which I received yesterday, shows a concurrence of his opinion in every principle advanced by...
Mr Dandridge will be pleased to lay before the President a letter & plans relating to the proposed arsenal for South-Carolina, received during the late absence of the President—and the letters from Govr Matthews and James Ross Esqr. lately recd. AL , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . The letter and plans for a South Carolina arsenal are not identified. In a letter dated 16 April, Georgia governor George...
Mr Dandridge will be pleased to lay the inclosed papers before the President. 1. A Letter of the 29th ulto from Genl Morgan. 2.   do   do   from Colo. Butler. 3. Extract of a letter from Major Craig. 4. Copy of a letter to Govr Mifflin. The Secretary of War will wait on the President to-morrow morning to take his orders relative to General Morgan and any other matters referred to in the...
An express is going this morning with money to General Morgan’s army. I left with the President yesterday the copy of my letter of the 1st which went by last Saturday’s post to Genl Morgan. I would transmit that as a duplicate. And if the President thinks that a greater portion of the militia should be immediately discharged, or would give any other orders respecting them, I shall be happy to...
The inclosed draught of a letter to the Governors of Virginia, Maryland, South Carolina, Georgia & New York, you will be pleased to lay before the President for his approbation. I wish to send to Virginia & Maryland & New York by this day’s post. yr obt servt ALS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . Pickering erroneously wrote 1794 on the ALS . The letter is endorsed as 1795, and the letter-book copy is...
If the President should approve of the inclosed letter to the Governor of New-York, it will be transmitted, with the two papers therein referred to, by to-morrow’s post. Mr Dandridge will be so good as to lay them before the President. ALS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . This letter and the accompanying papers have not been identified. On this day, Bartholomew Dandridge, Jr., returned the draft of...
Be pleased to hand the inclosed papers for the perusal of the President. I will do myself the honour to wait on him respecting them to-day—at any hour the President shall direct, if one will be more convenient to him than another. I am sir, your most obt servt I send the map which you said the President requested with the boundaries of the lands of the Six Nations marked on it. ALS , DLC:GW ;...
The inclosed instructions to Mr Price, who is to manage the Indian trading store in Georgia, and to Captain Eaton who is to command the troops destined to St Mary’s river, I pray you to lay before the President for his inspection, and approbation or correction. I have this moment finished them. I will wait on the President to receive his orders concerning them either this evening or as early...
Lt Colo. Butler, who commands at Fort Pitt, has suggested that probably many good recruits might be enlisted from the militia under Genl Morgan’s command. There is little doubt of considerable success if the attempt be made. I intended to have taken the President’s direction on this point, when I waited on him to-day; but it escaped me. I presume there can be no hazard in lessening the...
Mr Dandridge will be pleased to hand the inclosed letter and papers from Genl Wayne to the President. The result of the Conference at Greenville between General Wayne & the Indians is this. That a general treaty shall be held at Greenville about the 15th of next June, with the Chippawas, Ottawas, Pattawatamies, Sakies and Miamis, to conclude on articles of peace; agreeably to preliminary...
Mr Dandridge will be pleased, at a convenient time, to lay the inclosed letter before the President. The writer, David Campbell, of the southwestern territory, begged it might be presented; otherwise The Secretary of War would not have troubled the President with its perusal. It contains merely an eulogy on Governor Blount, as the writer says “in energetic strains.” He aims at the poetic...
I enclose the papers before handed to you respecting Ichabod Grummans claim, and a new and more accurate statement of his income by which it appears that on the principal admitted in his case, he may ask an indemnification of nine hundred & thirty one dollars 78 cents for the loss which he sustained by the sickness which lately prevailed in Philadelphia. I am &c. LC , RG 28, Letter Books,...
General Post Office, March 28, 1794. “I have reviewed my calculations respecting Ichabod Grumman’s claim for an allowance on Account of the loss he sustained in carrying the mail between Philadelphia and New York, by reason of the fatal sickness in the former city, during the last Autumn; and seeing no cause for alteration in the statement, I now request your approbation, in writing , as you...
I have just received your letter of the 21st relative to Mr. Pitcairn. As soon as the President had determined to change our Minister at Paris, I considered it not less necessary to make a change in the Consulate; and Mr Pinckney will go thither with the requisite powers on this subject. I have mentioned to him Mr Pitcairn as the gentleman whom he may safely and advantageously employ in the...
The manner in which I have been employed to effect the present visit of the Chiefs of the Five Nations, renders me peculiarly interested that the negociations with them should conform with the direct object of the invitation. This object is indelibly impressed on my mind; it having been the main argument offered by me, to convince them of the real friendship of the United States. I feel...
[ Philadelphia, January 19, 1795. On January 19, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Pickering : “I have recd. your letter of this day.” Letter not found. ]
The printer of Mr. Randolph’s vindication advertises that it will be published next Friday. The translation of Fauchet’s letter will be in it. This translation was made by Mr. Taylor at Randolph’s request; but Mr. Taylor, who desired the use of mine, told me that he had made but few variations. Now if I have mistaken the sense in any material passages, it is highly probable that they will be...
I have this day recd. your letter of the 19th. instant. It is in some sort anticipated by mine of last week. But the inclosed letter to Mr. Peter Anspach is to request him with Mr. Wolfe’s assistance to present you with a statement of the debts intended to have been provided for by the anticipation you mention, & which yet remain unsatisfied. The documents are in his hand. I remarked in my...
The President is anxious to ascertain whether the gentlemen he has thought of for Commissioners under the 6th & 7th articles of the British treaty will accept of those employments. He has concluded to appoint Egbert Benson Esqr. one of the Commissioners for executing the 6th article, relative to the debts owing to British subjects—if he will accept of the employment. He is held in such high...
After much enquiry, I have found a house which would accommodate my numerous family, and at the same time give me office-room. The greatly extended business of the department, I think may be accomplished with the same help which has been used since the time of Mr. Osgoods appointment, to wit, an assistant and clerk. For these, with their necessary writing desks, table, boxes, cases & shelves,...
[ Philadelphia, January 8, 1795. On January 20, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Pickering and referred to “your letter of the 8th. instant.” Letter not found. ]
Last evening a gentleman called on me to inform me of Mr. Duer’s resignation; and to urge me to apply for the vacant office. Having since reflected on a variety of circumstances which would render the office eligible, I have concluded to make known to you my willingness to take it, if you, who know me perfectly well, think I can give you the aid you would wish for and expect in an assistant....
Conveyances to and from this place rarely offer, which, I suppose, prevented my receiving your favor of May 13th until a few days past. In appointments to public employments, when I had such to make, I am not conscious that personal considerations ever influenced my choice. The same principle determines me to be satisfied, and, if you will allow the expression, to approve of your appointment...
Since the close of the last War with Great Britain the Mails for Canada, brought by the British Packets to New York have been transmitted to Albany by the carriers of the Mails of the United States; and from Albany by a Courier to Montreal. Mr Lansing the postmaster at Albany, was the agent in this business in behalf of the Deputy postmaster General for Canada. Mr Lansing made some...
I have recd. a letter of the 6th ult. from Mr. Anspach, stating the necessity of his being furnished with two or three thousand dollars, to pay some arrears due to himself, Mr. Wolfe, Mr. Dill, & a few others who were employed in the late department of the Quarter Master General—that the payment of those arrears, particularly his, Mr. Wolfe’s & Mr. Dill’s will enable them to complete the...
I am sorry to have so long delayed an answer to your letter of the 23d. but we have been unusually occupied, and the decrees you referred to were not readily found: that of the 28th of May 1793 I have now discovered in a printed volume of the proceedings of the Convention for that month. So I now inclose you copies— 1st of the decree of May 9th 1793, violating our treaty, by rendering neutral...
I have just read a passage in your circular letter of June 25th to the Collectors of the Customs, putting on the 12th section of the Post-Office-Law a construction which I conceive to be erroneous & which will materially injure the revenue of the department. I recollect your dropping the same idea transiently when I last saw you. I then searched for but overlooked the clause which showed that...
The Indians of the Five Nations who lately visited Philadelphia, received their invitation from me , in the manner described in the inclosed copy of a letter to the President. Mr. Kirkland, the bearer of my message, received his instructions from the Secretary of War, to whom he from time to time transmitted information of his proceedings. Of this I was ignorant until after the arrival of the...
When I received your letter of the 13th of August, I did not consider it with the attention which would have been necessary if at that time I had attempted to answer the questions you propose. Now it appears to me impossible to do it, with any degree of precision. It then struck me that certain communications to the Society of Agriculture of this city would have furnished the principal...
I have received and considered your letter of the 23rd instant, proposing that a credit should be given to the Supervisors of the Revenue for the postage of Letters, until their collections should render it convenient to make payment. I shall as you request instruct the Deputy Postmasters, at the places by you enumerated, to open accounts with the respective Supervisors, and to accommodate the...