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The Secretary of States has the honor to lay before the President of the United States the opinion of the Attorney General, that a secretary may be allowed to a Minister Resident, or Chargé des Affaires. The Secretary has considered the situation of our affairs with the Barbary powers, & particularly with Algiers, and the necessity of a consul to reside there. That altho’ Mr Barlow desires to...
I inclose the form of the summons by Mr. Jefferson on the former occasion, to the Senators to attend on the 4th of March, and that which would seem to me proper on the present occasion; and by the favour of you to make any alterations that shall appear best; also to fill the blank for the hour of assembling at the Senate Chamber. With great respect / your obt. servt MHi : Adams Papers.
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States three letters this day received from Mr J.Q. Adams. The note in French inclosed in his No. 88. is directed to the Committee for foreign affairs, to inform them that he was authorized to confer & prepare arrangements for ameliorations of the commercial treaty between the two republics, and desired to be...
I beg leave to inform you, that Major Allen McLane whose merit and fidelity as a military officer are so well known, & who is now marshal of Delaware State, an office of more burden than profit, is desirous of succeeding Mr Stockton in the loan office, in case the latter should be appointed Collector at Wilmington. Major McLane understands that his name is on the list of candidates for the...
The President will read with pleasure the postscript of the inclosed letter from Robert Montgomery our Consul at Alicante, which I have received this day—excepting what relates to the capture of another American vessel by Tripo li; concerning which however Mr Barlow’s words are consoling. The last sentence broken by the seal I read thus—"I have taken now what I think will be effectual measures...
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President of the U. States the draught of an answer to the Grand Master of Malta. If approved & signed, the Secretary proposes to commit the same to the care of M. Maisonneuve who desires to be Consul at Malta, who forwarded the letter from the Grand Master, and to whom Mr La Colomb (who is settled in Philadelphia) will send the packet by a...
On the 11th instant I delivered to Samuel Bloodworth, son of the Senator, a letter to Mr. Jefferson covering the certificate of the President of the Senate of his being elected the vice-president of the U States, which Mr Bloodworth was specially charged to deliver in person to Mr. Jefferson. To-day the father returned me the letter, under a cover which contained one with your name upon it...
On the 11th. instant I delivered the inclosed packet to Mr. Bloodworth, son of the Senator from North-Carolina, to deliver to you with his own hand. To-day it was returned to me by the father with the inclosed note. I also wrote you by the mail which left Philadelphia last monday, to communicate the copy of the certificate of your election to the office of vice-President of the United States,...
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President of the U. States the draughts of letters to General Pinckney Colo. Humphreys and Mr Adams. In the letter to Colo. Humphreys (not private) remains to be added what is mentioned in that to Mr Adams respecting his salary, on which the Secretary entertained some doubts; but on the whole deemed the principle he has adopted to be...
I have the honor to inform you, that pursuant to the request of the Senate communicated to him yesterday, the President of the United States has directed me to transmit to you the inclosed certificate, under the hand and seal of the present Vice-President, of your being elected, agreeably to the Constitution, Vice-President of the United States of America. The bearer, Mr. Bloodworth, son of...
I have this day committed to Mr. Samuel Bloodworth, son of the Senator from North-Carolina, the original certificate of the President of the Senate, of your being elected Vice-President of the United States, which he is specially charged to deliver to you in person. But for the greater certainty of your receiving this notice, I have thought it expedient to convey to you a copy of the...
The Secretary of State has the honor to inform the President of the United States, that having examined the Constitution & the law respecting the President & Vice President of the U. States, he sees no part requiring that the Vice-President elect should come to the Seat of Government to take the oath to support the Constitution of the U.S. which appears to be the only oath required of him....
William Claiborne, of the State of Tennessee—to be district judge. Recommended by General Marshall—and strongly by Colo. Carrington. David Campbell, late a Judge of that Territory, is recommended for District Judge, by a Mr Roane the friend of James Ross Esqr. whom relies on his discernment & probity in the recommendation. Elias Baccman, a merchant of Gottenburg in Sweden, to be Consul for...
The Secretary of State has the honor to inclose a letter of Oct. 16. received this day from Mr Adams at the Hague. The following passage is in a letter recd this day from the Consul of the U. States at Falmouth in England, dated Novr 26th. "A vessel arrived to-day from Lisbon, and the master reports that at Madrid the populace would not permit Lord Bute to-depart, and that the Spanish and...
I am sorry to have so long delayed an answer to your letter of the 23d. but we have been unusually occupied, and the decrees you referred to were not readily found: that of the 28th of May 1793 I have now discovered in a printed volume of the proceedings of the Convention for that month. So I now inclose you copies— 1st of the decree of May 9th 1793, violating our treaty, by rendering neutral...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the U. States the letters received this day from Mr King, & the Commissioners of the U.S. in London. Also the draught of a message to the Senate containing nominations of three persons to be inspectors in No. Carolina. At the last Session they were commissioned, one as Collector and the other two as Surveyors, for the...
[ Philadelphia, January 23, 1797. On February 6, 1797, Hamilton wrote to Pickering : “I duly received your letter of the 23 of Jany.” Letter not found. ]
The Secretary of State has the pleasure to present to the President a letter received this morning from Colo. Humphreys, by which it appears that Capt. OBrien & hands with the treasure are safe in Tripoli—and that the Dey of Algiers has demanded the delivery on pain of making war: there can be little doubt of the recovery of the money, seeing the Dey considers it as the property of the...
I have the honor to return the address of the Senate of Pennsylvania, with the draught of an answer in terms which I imagined would correspond with your feelings, and which unsullied honor and the dignity of truth would authorize you to express. If however you prefer any other sentiments, by receiving the draught thus early, there will be time for alterations. I sent the intended letter to Mr...
The Secretary of State with great pleasure lays before the President of the United States the inclosed letters just received from Colo. Talbot, which confirm the utility of his mission, & the good-will of the British naval officers. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
To the President of the United States, The Secretary of State respectfully makes the following brief representation of the affairs of the United States in relation to Algiers. When Colonel Humphreys left America in April 1795, he was accompanied by Joseph Donaldson Esqr. who had been appointed Consul for Tunis and Tripoli; and him Colo. Humphreys was authorized to employ in negociating a...
Fearing your patience would be exhausted, I beg leave to hand you so much of my letter to Mr Pinckney as Mr Taylor has copied: he will proceed to complete it with the utmost diligence; but it will probably take him two days to do it. I was the more desirous to submit so much to your inspection, that if you should deem any material changes expedient they might be made with less delay. With the...
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President of the U. States, a letter from Colo. Humphreys dated Octr 6. just received, with inclosures from Mr Barlow. There is but too much reason to fear for the fate of Capt. O’Brien. He sailed from Lisbon the 4th or 5th of August for Algiers, with 225,000 dollars on board. The Secretary has also received to-day another letter from Colo....
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President the recommendations of Charles Marsh to be Attorney of the U. States (in the place of Amos Marsh) for the District of Vermont—and of Joseph Cloud of the State of Delaware to be Melter & Refiner at the Mint of the U. States. This will be the first appointment of Melter & Refiner with the approbation of the Senate; the person hitherto...
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President the great bulk of the papers which he has selected to lay before Congress relative to French affairs. Some others remain on which the Secretary is continuing the draft of his letter to Mr Pinckney. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
Judge Livermore & Mr Langdon have just handed me the inclosed petition, which is signed by the most respectable merchants in Portsmouth, recommending (and those Senators from their own knowledge concur in the recommendation) Nicholas Rousselet, & praying that he may be appointed Consul of the United States for the Colony of Essequebo & Demarara. This Dutch Colony is now in possession of the...
By the direction of the President of the United States, I have the honor to inclose a report of the Director of the Mint, suggesting the expediency of some alterations in its establishment, to render it less expensive to the public, and more accommodating to depositors. The report is accompanied with statements of the gold, silver, and copper coins issued from the mint from its commencement to...
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President the draught of a letter to communicate to Congress the report of the Director of the Mint. His report last year was laid before each house thro’ the Secretary, by the President’s direction. If approved, the present report will be communicated to-day. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President of the United States a list of appointments which have been made during the recess of the Senate. The list No. 2. accompanies the former, mentioning, where known, the occasion of those appointments. The Secretary had the first list prepared in that simple form, because he thought it might seem to the President unpleasant to note the...
The Secretary of State has the honour to lay before the President of the United States the draught of a letter to Colo. Humphreys, with such of his communications as one referred to and necessary to elucidate the remarks in the letter. The Secretary who presents a letter from Joseph Sterlitz resident of New York, communicating the request of his partner & uncle Philip Mark to be favoured with...
Captain Cathcart’s vessel, laden with stores for Algiers, he expects will sail to-morrow. The Secretary of State therefore respectfully lays before the President this evening the draught of a letter to the Dey, and a letter for Mr Barlow. The letter from the Dey is inclosed; together with the letters from Mr Barlow to which the answer draughted by the Secretary of State refers. These are too...
Be it known to all persons to whom these presents shall come, that I, George Washington , President of the United States of America, have authorised and empowered, and by this present writing do authorise and empower, Gustavus Scott, William Thornton and Alexander White, commissioners appointed by virtue of an act of congress, entitled, An act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat...
Doctor Edwards delivered to me to-day letters from Mr Monroe and Mr King. The Doctor arrived in the ship which had but nineteen days passage. Mr King’s letter of the 10th of September authenticates the one of the same date published in the news-papers, shewing, from Mr Monroe’s letter to him of August 28, that on the appearance of the letter from the minister of foreign affairs to M....
The news-papers which will go by this post, will present you with a letter from Mr King to Mr Johnson, the consul of the United States at London, containing the agreeable information that such a decree of the Directory as the note from Delacroix to Barthelemy imported, had not passed, nor would be issued, unless Britain set the example. Mr King’s letter as published is doubtless authentic: but...
Yesterday I received another letter from Mr King—it is dated the 16th of August, covering a duplicate of the former, and saying that he had heard nothing from Mr Monroe respecting the letter from the Directory to Mr Barthelemy, so interesting to the commerce of neutral powers: and this silence was the only circumstance that left him a hope that the letter in question is not genuine. At the...
To-day I was honoured with your letter of the 10th instant. A commission will be made out for Mr Bourne as district judge of Rhode Island. The letters concerning him which I transmitted to you yesterday will add to the satisfaction you have in conferring the commission on him. The gentleman who was recommended for district attorney for Kentuckey, was William Clarke. His commission was...
Last Saturday I received from Colo. Monroe a letter dated the 24th of July, in which he refers to a former one, in which he transmitted copies of M. Delacroix letter to him & his answer, on the question, Whether the House of Representatives of the United States had passed a law to carry the British treaty into effect? At the same time Mr Monroe expressed his opinion that this letter originated...
I have been honoured with your letter of the 28th ulto. A subsequent letter from Mr Monroe covered the copy of one from Dela Croix, the minister of the French Republic for foreign affairs, in which he still manifests some dissatisfaction: but this was so contrary to the information given by a member of the Directory to Mr Monroe, that the latter says he supposes the act to be that of the...
Last Saturday I received a letter from lieutenant governor Wood, and opened it, agreeably to your directions. He declines the office of Surveyor General, as not professionally qualified. The next day I rode to Belmont, to converse with Judge Peters relative to Major Alexander: but he was gone to see his brother Colo. Robinson, at Naaman’s Creek. On Tuesday Judge Peters, as usual, came to town,...
I have just received your letter of the 21st relative to Mr. Pitcairn. As soon as the President had determined to change our Minister at Paris, I considered it not less necessary to make a change in the Consulate; and Mr Pinckney will go thither with the requisite powers on this subject. I have mentioned to him Mr Pitcairn as the gentleman whom he may safely and advantageously employ in the...
Yesterday I received from Mr Monroe a letter dated the 12th of June, from which we may conclude that the complaints of the French Republic, which had been the subject of his former letters, will not be renewed. But it may be more satisfactory to read Mr Monroes own words at length; and therefore I inclose an extract from his letter, being the only thing interesting in it. Mr Craik will present...
I have just received a letter dated the 17th from Judge Benson: He accepts the place of third Commissioner under the fifth article of the British treaty, and was to set out yesterday for Passamaquoddy, to meet there the other Commissioners on the third of October. The trust, he remarks, is not incompatible with his present office; and interfering with it only for a short time, his acceptance...
The President set out early this morning for Mount Vernon; and soon after, his address to the people of the United States appeared in Claypoole’s news-paper. Of this public declaration, that he will not be a candidate for the office of President, at the ensuing election, I supposed it would be grateful to you to receive the earliest advice. The sentiments he has expressed on the occasion may...
Demands on the fund for the contingent expences of government will doubtless arise in your absence. I request your order to the Secretary of the Treasury to cause two thousand dollars to be paid to me to answer such demands; and am with great respect your most obt. servt. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President the instructions for Mr Ellicott, altered to conform to the President’s idea. If approved, they will be delivered this evening to Mr Ellicott, as he wishes to start very early in the morning. The Secretary also submits a draught of instructions for General Pinckney—corrected & enlarged. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
The paper you put into my hands to-day was attentively perused by us all. I am now going over it by myself, but it will not be possible to get thro’ in time to return it before bedtime. Before breakfast in the morning I will wait upon you with it. I am most respectfully your obt servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I submit to your consideration the inclosed draught of instructions for Messrs Ellicott & Freeman, for running the boundary line between the U. States and the Spanish colonies of East & West Florida; and am, most respectfully, your obedt servant I have just heard that Capt. German is arrived, & consequently Mr. Pinckney, from Charleston. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
The Secretary of State respectfully submits to the President of the U. States a letter intended for Mr King, the occasion of which is exhibited in the accompanying letter from the deputy collector of Norfolk. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
In draughting the letter of credence for Mr Pinckney, the motives for his appointment, arising out of the present state of things between the U. States & France, pressed me to depart from the usual formalities of this diplomatic instrument: it is therefore respectfully submitted to your consideration, for any alterations you may deem proper previous to its being transcribed. I also submit the...
I have just received your letter of the 29th. ulto. enquiring about your son Thos. B. Adams at the Hague. On the day of the date of your letter I recd. one from him dated the 28th. of May, from which be pleased to receive the following extract, containing all the information I can give in answer to your enquiries, excepting that the latest letter from your eldest son is dated the 22d. of June...