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This Indenture made the twentieth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two Between William Constable of the City of New York in the State of New York Gentleman and Ann his wife of the first part and Alexander Hamilton and Gouverneur Morris of the same State Esquires of the second part. Whereas by a certain agreement entered into and made before Mr. Lewis Fevot...
This Indenture made the fourth Day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two Between James Donatianus Le Ray de Chaumont of the first Part, Gouverneur Morris of the second Part and Alexander Hamilton of the third Part. Whereas it hath been agreed by and between the Parties of the first and second Part that the said Party of the second Part shall pay to the said...
We did ourselves the honor to write to your Excellency from Elizabeth-Town on the 16th instant, after which, we concluded it necessary to retire from thence, as some people might have been induced, from a suppos’d neutrality, to have had improper communications with the Enemy. Mr Skinner proceeded to New-York on that day, but from bad weather was not able to return untill the 20th. We have...
We arrived here yesterday a few Minutes after twelve. The british Commissioners have not yet appeared. We learn that Letters have gone forward to your Excellency from the british General and Admiral. We shall set off from home this Day, and wait your farther orders in the Vicinity. Colo. Skinner will forward them. We have the Honor to enclose an English Paper of the third of January, by which...
As it is probable that our report of this date may after having been transmitted to Congress come before the public eye, we have thought it best to give in a distinct letter the information which it may be unnecessary or improper to publish. Your Excellency will perceive that we had no proper oppo rt unity of bringing forward distinctly the affair of Mr Laurens. By pushing it abruptly into...
Colo. Smith delivered your Excellency’s Letter of the twenty eighth, between four and five Yesterday Afternoon. You mention having had Intimations, that under the Idea of the Cessation of Hostilities a Number of People intend to come over from New York to our Lines, and express your particular Desire that no Persons coming from the Enemy may be permitted to Land, except the Commissioners and...
General Forman (who is now on his way to you with a Representation on the Hanging of Captain Hoddy by the Refugees) will have the Honor of delivering your Excellency this Letter. Previous to the Generals Arrival we had heard of this Matter altho not so particularly. We mentioned it to General Dalrymple and Mr Elliott. They seemed to be surprised and wounded at the Information & assured us of...
We received your Excellency’s Letter of the fourteenth this Morning, previous to the Receipt of which we had written to you by Lieutenant Blair of the Jersey Line. We have written to Sir Henry Clinton, of which the enclosed is a Copy, and sent it with another to the Officer commanding on Staten Island requesting him to facilitate Mr Skinner’s Passage to New York, whom we have instructed to...
By unavoidable Incidents this Letter is delayed beyond the usual Time for which I assure you I am extremely sorry. Your Favor gave great Pleasure as well to the Committee as to several Members of the House who are much pleased with your judicious Caution to distinguish between what you sport as your private Opinion and the weighty Sentiments of the General. No Circumstance could have more...
public Sir London 18 September 1790 I had the Honor to address you on the 16th of August, and stated as nearly as I could the Situation of Russia and Sweden. This Situation has produced a very natural Effect. Sweden being unsupported by her allies, and Russia having Nothing to gain by farther Fighting but a Part of the finland Deserts not worth fighting for, they have struck a Bargain of Peace...
I have received your Favor of the eighth Instant and am looking out for an Opportunity to send on the Plate, concluding you will some how or other take the whole Set. You say you have Forks and Spoons enough. In that Case it will be better to sell them, which can always be done to Advantage, and take those belonging to the Set which if I remember right are made of a Pattern to suit the Rest....
My last was of the tenth of July. Mr: Livingston, who is on his way to America, presents an opportunity of writing, which must not be neglected, altho’ I am engaged at present in Examination of the account received from the Commissioners of the Treasury. I have already mentioned to you, Sir, that the whole of this account is open, and I must now observe that I do not find myself particularly...
I have received your kind Letter of the thirteenth of October and immediately set about procuring the Articles you there mention. Such of them at least as are best to be procured in this Capital. They are already on their Way to Havre and you will find here enclosed the Account of the Cost (including the Packages) ⟨L⟩ 2384 . The Transportation to Havre will cost 46 The Charges there and the...
I had the Honor to write to you on the twenty ninth of April last. I shall not trouble you with a Recital of Events which Mr Jefferson has I know very amply communicated to the Office of foreign Affairs. But being here on my Way to London, and finding a Vessel bound directly to New York, I take the Opportunity to send some Tables which contain the political military pecuniary and commercial...
Permit me to congratulate you on the passing a Resolution for a Kind of Establishment at this late Hour It is not what you wished but it may do You must pardon a little to the Republicanism of our Ideas. What is a little extraordinary there was no Dissentient State and only two Individuals Yet no Measure hath ever been more severely contested. We shall now go thro the Regimental & other...
In reading over my Letter of Yesterday I find that I omitted to mention the War with Spain . Truth is that it was a Matter so much of Course and of so little Importance that it escap’d my Recollection. Our Commissioners will doubtless turn it to Account. Last Evening I was inform’d that the french Army in Flanders has been defeated but as this is not an official Account I meerly mention it as...
Paris, July 30, 1792. “My last was of the twenty third. I am now favord with yours of the same Date. I receiv’d Yesterday the Account from the Commissioners of the Treasury and as I suppos’d it contains a Credit for the Antwerp Payments at the Current Exchange. From the Letter which accompanies it however I observe that the Commissrs. meant a different Thing, but the Clerks in extracting from...
This will accompany Duplicates of No. 30 and 31. I have now the Honor to transmit a Copy of the Decision made by the Municipality of Dunkerque on the third Instant respecting the Ship Fame which I receivd last night in a Letter from that Place of the seventh which informs me that the Ship was then sail’d. I have just now written to Mr. Le brun (who by the bye is en État d’arrestation ) a...
Upon my Arrival at this Place I spoke to Mr Jefferson on the Subject of your Watch. He told me that the Man who had made Maddison’s was a Rogue and recommended me to another—Romilly—But as it might happen that this also was a Rogue I enquired at a very honest Man’s Shop, not a Watch Maker, and he recommended Gregson. A Gentleman with me assured me that Gregson was a Rogue and both of them...
I din’d the Day before Yesterday tête a tête with the Russian Minister Count Woranzow who is a very sensible and well inform’d Man. In the Course of an Interesting Conversation after Dinner your Name was Mention’d and he exprest a Desire to see your various Reports to Congress. These he means to transmit to his Brother who is the Minister of Commerce in Russia in Order to undeceive him with...
Accept at this late Period my Congratulations upon your safe Arrival in America. I know not whether to add the farther Congratulation upon your Appointment to and Acceptance of the Office of Secretary of State because the latter is not yet ascertained on this Side of the Atlantic. You will find enclosed a Paper from your friend Sir John Sinclair to whom you was so kind as to introduce me. Pray...
Your letter of the second instant did not reach me until yesterday afternoon. I am afraid that the delay may be attended with some ill consequence, however I have given the necessary directions for payment of one million, six hundred and twenty five thousand bank florins to Messrs. Hoguer Grand and company, which at the exchange you have mentioned, is equal to six million of livres. I hope...
I have received your favor of the fifteenth of April and also a Copy of it. In the Close of that Letter you mention my not having acknowleged the Receipt of your public Letter of the thirteenth of October. I have received the original Duplicate and triplicate of that Letter. I had the Honor to acknowledge the Receipt by mine of the twenty second of January with which I sent a private Letter of...
Enclosed is a Packett containing two Weeks News Papers for Genl Dalrymple—They are sent in Consequence of an Agreement we made at Elizabeth town being a cartel of Gazettes—We were to send out the New York Papers—these we want for the Use of the Office and had in Vain attempted to get them thro the Commissary of Prisoners. He promised very fairly—Should Genl Dalrymple send out the News Papers...
As Congress have delegated to a Committee, of which I have the Honor to be a Member, the Superintendance of the Commissary & Quarter Masters Departments; this, together with our Finances which we have long been cobling at, hath obliged me to consider in a more compleat View the State of our Affairs than my former detached Attention would permit, or indeed than my natural Indolence would have...
I cannot prevail on myself to omit the present Occasion of offering my Respects, altho I have Nothing to say which is worth your Perusal. It may not however be quite unsatisfactory to receive even Conjecture on a Subject whose Importance is great and whose Situation precludes Evidence. As far as one who avoids much Enquiry can judge I am led to decide that the Opposers to the new Constitution...
Paris, August 6, 1792. “My last was of the thirtieth of July since which I am without advices from you. I have agreed with the Commissioners of the Treasury for the present and in Consequence I pray you will give our Bankers an order to pay to Messrs. Hoguer Grand and Company the Sum of one Million six hundred and twenty five thousand florins banco and desire them at the same Time to send me a...
Paris, August 20, 1792. “Yours of the seventh was long in coming probably mine of the 9th. was equally delayed. You will find by it that I had agreed with the Commissioners as to a pretty considerable Payment on that Day. The Events of the tenth ought not I think to make any Change in that Disposition. I think your Reasoning is good as far as it goes and if the Powers to me had been sufficient...
Your favor of the 12 Sepr last reached me a few Days ago. In the Proposition of S[chweizer] J[eannerett] & Co: I saw the Means of saving Somewhat to the United States without incurring the Odium of a Payment in depreciated Paper but from the Moment a Determination to pay in Value is adopted I heartily and entirely approve of the Rejection of their Offer. Before the Receipt of your Letter, Mr...
I have your two Letters of the 27th. of Feby. and the 4th. Instant. I thank you for them. In Reply to what you tell me in the Close of the former I can only say that your Talents if not your Birth entitle you to the Rank of an American Citizen. To be born in America seems to be a Matter of Indifference at New York, an advantage in New England, a Disadvantage in Pensilvania. You say I am not....