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    • Morris, Gouverneur
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Documents filtered by: Author="Morris, Gouverneur" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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private My dear Sir, Paris 10 June 1792. Altho I have been above a Month in this City I have not been able untill within a Day or two to make up my Mind as to the Sentiments of the Person mentiond to you in mine of the twenty first of March, or rather I could not obtain that Certainty which was needful before I could properly mention them to you. I can now venture to assure you that by coming...
During a late Visit to New York, I learnt that the leading federal Characters (even in Massachusetts) consider Mr Adams as unfit for the Office he now holds. Without pretending to decide on the Merits of that Opinion, which will operate alike whether well or illfounded, it appeared necessary to name some other Person. You will easily conceive that his Predecessor was wished for and regretted,...
This Letter will be confin’d to a single Object. I had Yesterday the Honor to see Lord Grenville. After some general Conversation we fell naturally on the State of Things between this Country and America. On the Capture of our provision Vessels (premising that I had no Right to interfere) I exprest a Wish that the Redress intended might be speedy, as Delay was hurtful to the Merchant. His...
This will accompany my last of the 30 Decr. Within these two Days I have receivd Duplicates of the Letters to which it replies Accept I pray you my Thanks for that Attention. A many little Things have detaind me here since the Navigation opened but the Day after Tomorrow I shall I trust embark for London. I will take the Liberty of writing to you from that City on the State of Things as they...
Duplicate My dear Sir, Paris 5 Feby 1794. In a New’s Paper of this Day I find the Translation of your Message of the fifth of December to Congress, and observe that after stating the Violation of the Treaty by a Decree of the national Convention you tell them I have been instructed to make Representations on the Subject. Now this my dear Sir is the first I hear and all I know of such...
(private) My dear Sir Paris 10 January 1793 As I have good Reason to beleive that this Letter will go safely, I shall mention some Things which may serve as a Clue to lead thro Misteries—Those who plannd the Revolution which took Place on the tenth of August sought a Person to head the Attack, and they found a Mr Westermann whose Morals were far from Exemplary. He has no Pretensions to Science...
Your Letter of the twenty eighth of last Month came safe to Hand this Day. Accept my Thanks for the several Letters of Introduction you have taken the Trouble to write. I feel a proper Sense of your Kindness on this, as on many other Occasions, and I hope and beleive that I shall have Opportunities of evincing my Attachment. At the same Time I beleive, and hope, and most ardently desire that...
I had the Honor to address to you a Letter on the 22d of last Month in the Close of which I mentioned the Intention of saying at a future Period some few Words of the People who are now on the Stage. To begin then with our friend La fayette, who has hitherto acted a splendid Part. Unfortunately both for himself and his Country he has not the Talents which his Situation requires. This important...
I do myself the Honor to enclose a Copy of my Letter of the first Instant. On the Night of the fourth there was a hot Press here which has continued ever since, and the declared Object is to compel Spain to atone for an Insult offered to Great Britain by capturing two Vessels in Nootka Sound. Permit me to observe incidentally that it would not be amiss for the American Captain who was a...
Accept I pray you the Seeds sent herewith. They are from the King’s Gardens and as you will observe by the within List the trees and Plants are from the Southern Provinces of this Kingdom—I think therefore they will flourish at Mount Vernon. I am always truly yours. AL , DLC:GW . The original of this undated note is filed at the end of January 1790 in the Washington Papers at the Library of...
I received your Favor and return you Thanks for it. The Conduct which the Enemy may pursue with Relation to us is not quite decided But I have not a Doubt but their Efforts during the next Campaign will be chiefly towards our Frontiers with a View to weary us into Submission. At the same Time they will perhaps endeavor to keep such Posts in our Country as to render the Communications tedious...
Two Days ago I was placed on a Committee to report the necessary Provision to be made for Officers not heretofore provided for. I recollect at present the general Officers & Erskine’s Corps (The Surgeons are already reported & the Report set down for this Day when as the Devil will have it I cannot attend) but as it would produce many Inconveniences to make this Provision which Congress intend...
I receive this Instant your favor of the twenty eighth of January and I do most sincerely thank you for the Informations which you have been so kind as to communicate. Beleive me I know how to value the friendship by which they were dictated. I have always thought that the Counsel of our Enemies is wholesome, tho bitter, if we can but turn it to good Account & In order that I may not fail to...
I am to acknowlege the Receipt of yours of the seventeenth of December which reached me several Days ago, but no good opportunity then presented itself to convey a Reply. The Idea you formed of the british Cabinet was I am perswaded perfectly just. This Government has lately taken some Steps which cannot but be advantageous to their Rivals for I am perswaded that the late Decrees laying a...
I am to acknowlege the Receipt of yours of the seventeenth of December which reached me several Days ago, but no good Opportunity then presented itself to convey a Reply. The Idea you formed of the british Cabinet was I am persuaded perfectly just. This Government has lately taken some Steps which cannot but be advantageous to their Rivals for I am persuaded that the late Decrees laying a...
I had the Honor to write to you on the third of July of which Letter I now enclose a Copy. I have patiently waited since that Period for the Answer which had been promised on the twenty first of May to my Letter of the thirtieth of April. Had any Circumstance turned up which would in my opinion have justified a new application it should have been made, but this has not been the Case. You will...
The last Letter which I had the Honor to write was of the 11 Jany. On the Subjects there mention’d I will only say that the french Finances are quite as bad as I suppos’d they would be. That another Campaign seems now unavoidable. And that it is so much the Interest of some among the allied Powers to restore royal Authority in France that I think it will now form a real Object. If you ask my...
In wishing you many & happy years I beg Leave to transmit an Extract from a Letter of Madame de Chattellux lately receiv’d. It is as follows “—This being a safe opportunity I shall acquaint you with those Steps I have taken to sollicit your Country’s Protection, and if possible something more, in favour of my little Alfred whose Situation you are no Stranger to. I have applied to that Purpose...
You will excuse in me the Liberty I have taken in requesting Colo. Morgan to call on you. That Gentleman can give you much and important Information relative to the State of our Western Frontiers. From the first View of the Commander in that Department at York Town he struck me as one of those who excel in the Regularity of Still Life from the Possession of an indolent Uniformity of Soul. The...
I was in your Debt. It is my Fate always to be so with my Friends. But beleive me my Heart owes Nothing. Let me add that you can do me no Favor so great as to comply with your Wishes except an Opportunity to serve the Public which indeed is your highest Wish as you have evidenced fully to all the World & particularly to your Friends. I feel the full Force of your Reasoning. The Faith of...
private Just before I left Town I receiv’d a Letter from Mr Mountflorence informing that Mr Skipwith whom Mr Munroe had appointed to the Consulate at Paris intended to resign and that Mr Munroe had promised to recommend him to that Place. He at the same Time desir’d me (if I thought him fit for the Place) to mention it to my friends in America. After this Introduction I take the Liberty to...
[Duplicate] Private Dear Sir Paris 22 January 1790 In another Letter of this Date I have mentioned a Part of Yesterday’s Conversation with the Count de Montmorin. That Part of it which I am now to communicate is for yourself alone. As Monsieur de la fayette had asked me some Days ago who should be sent to replace the Comte de Moustiers and (upon my answering with great Indifference it might be...
Duplicate Sir, London 3 July 1790 This Letter will accompany Copies of what I had the Honor to write on the first and twenty ninth of May. I have heard nothing since from the Duke of Leeds. On the tenth of June the King prorogued the Parliament, which was dissolved on the eleventh. The Elections will be compleated in about ten Days, and then the Ministers will feel themselves more at Liberty...
Herewith I have the Honor to transmit a Duplicate of my last Letter of the thirteenth of April. Not having heard from the Duke of Leeds I wrote him a Note on the nineteenth, of which a Copy is enclosed marked No. 1. To this I received no Reply, wherefore on the twenty ninth I addressed him again by a Letter of which a Copy is enclosed marked No. 2. This was delivered at his Office Whitehall...
Shortly after your Departure from this Place, I went to my Farm and returned hither last Sunday Evening. Living out of the busy World, I had Nothing to say worth your Attention, or I would earlier have given you the Trouble you now experience. Altho not very inquisitive about political opinions I have not been quite inattentive. The States Eastward of New York appear to be almost unanimous in...
I received your Excellency’s Favor of the eighteenth Instant last Evening. I pray you to accept my most grateful Acknowledgements for this mark of Approbation and Confidence. As the Enemy appear to be desirous of doing Justice the Meeting about to take Place will I trust be under better Auspices than the former. It may perhaps be successful. Nothing would give me greater Pleasure than to...
I had Hopes untill last Evening that the Persons who are to go out as Commissioners from hence would have embarkd with Captain Culver, but Circumstances have delay’d the Appointment. The Plan which was in Agitation and which will probably be carried into Effect is to send over three or four Commissioners one of whom will be charg’d with Letters of Credence but instructed to conform to the...
I take the Liberty of introducing to your Acquaintance Mr Darby a young Gentleman of family from England—He comes hither with warm Recommendations from our Ministers abroad and as far as may be determined from a very short Acquaintance is a Man of fashion who has kept the best Company—His Object is to see America and his first Excursion is to see you. Believe me very truly yours DLC : Papers...
I to write a Letter if I you to excuse. If I am rightly inform’d of the Situation of the Enemy the Next Embarkation will not leave above 6.000 Men in New York. Supposing this to be the Case I will go on to suppose that the french Troops with 2.000 Militia are thrown upon Long Island and march Westward. That you move down with 10.000 Men to the Neighbourhood of Kings bridge and at a proper...
I wrote to you a Note on the 19th to accompany your Plateauxs. My last Letter was of the twenty fourth of September. Since that Period I have past thro flanders and a Part of Germany, and having coasted the Rhine to Strasbourgh came thence to this City. As I conjectured, so it has happened, that my longer Continuance in London would have been useless. Spain, finding from the Revolt of the...