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Documents filtered by: Author="Morris, Gouverneur" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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We did ourselves the honor to write to your Excellency from Elizabeth-Town on the 16th instant, after which, we concluded it necessary to retire from thence, as some people might have been induced, from a suppos’d neutrality, to have had improper communications with the Enemy. Mr Skinner proceeded to New-York on that day, but from bad weather was not able to return untill the 20th. We have...
We arrived here yesterday a few Minutes after twelve. The british Commissioners have not yet appeared. We learn that Letters have gone forward to your Excellency from the british General and Admiral. We shall set off from home this Day, and wait your farther orders in the Vicinity. Colo. Skinner will forward them. We have the Honor to enclose an English Paper of the third of January, by which...
As it is probable that our report of this date may after having been transmitted to Congress come before the public eye, we have thought it best to give in a distinct letter the information which it may be unnecessary or improper to publish. Your Excellency will perceive that we had no proper oppo rt unity of bringing forward distinctly the affair of Mr Laurens. By pushing it abruptly into...
Colo. Smith delivered your Excellency’s Letter of the twenty eighth, between four and five Yesterday Afternoon. You mention having had Intimations, that under the Idea of the Cessation of Hostilities a Number of People intend to come over from New York to our Lines, and express your particular Desire that no Persons coming from the Enemy may be permitted to Land, except the Commissioners and...
General Forman (who is now on his way to you with a Representation on the Hanging of Captain Hoddy by the Refugees) will have the Honor of delivering your Excellency this Letter. Previous to the Generals Arrival we had heard of this Matter altho not so particularly. We mentioned it to General Dalrymple and Mr Elliott. They seemed to be surprised and wounded at the Information & assured us of...
We received your Excellency’s Letter of the fourteenth this Morning, previous to the Receipt of which we had written to you by Lieutenant Blair of the Jersey Line. We have written to Sir Henry Clinton, of which the enclosed is a Copy, and sent it with another to the Officer commanding on Staten Island requesting him to facilitate Mr Skinner’s Passage to New York, whom we have instructed to...
By unavoidable Incidents this Letter is delayed beyond the usual Time for which I assure you I am extremely sorry. Your Favor gave great Pleasure as well to the Committee as to several Members of the House who are much pleased with your judicious Caution to distinguish between what you sport as your private Opinion and the weighty Sentiments of the General. No Circumstance could have more...
Permit me to congratulate you on the passing a Resolution for a Kind of Establishment at this late Hour It is not what you wished but it may do You must pardon a little to the Republicanism of our Ideas. What is a little extraordinary there was no Dissentient State and only two Individuals Yet no Measure hath ever been more severely contested. We shall now go thro the Regimental & other...
Enclosed is a Packett containing two Weeks News Papers for Genl Dalrymple—They are sent in Consequence of an Agreement we made at Elizabeth town being a cartel of Gazettes—We were to send out the New York Papers—these we want for the Use of the Office and had in Vain attempted to get them thro the Commissary of Prisoners. He promised very fairly—Should Genl Dalrymple send out the News Papers...
As Congress have delegated to a Committee, of which I have the Honor to be a Member, the Superintendance of the Commissary & Quarter Masters Departments; this, together with our Finances which we have long been cobling at, hath obliged me to consider in a more compleat View the State of our Affairs than my former detached Attention would permit, or indeed than my natural Indolence would have...