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Jas. Monroe has the pleasure to enclose to Mr. Madison a power of attorney from Genl. La Fayette relative to whom he will shortly write him more fully. He can not omit adding here that that respectable & virtuous character merits all the regard which America has never ceased to entertain for him. RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). Docketed by JM: “Monroe Js. Aug. 1. 1803. inclosing...
I have received information that measures, imposing serious restrictions on our navigation and commerce, are taking in the North of Europe, with a view to guard against the disorder called the yellow fever. It is represented that these restrictions are likely to be generally extended in that quarter thro’ the means of a concert, promoted by one of the most influential powers and it is probable...
§ From James Monroe. 21 February 1815, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to propose for your approbation the appointment of James J. Ryan & Patrick McKeon, as Second Lieutenants in the 27th. Regiment of Infantry.” RC ( DNA : RG 46, Executive Proceedings, Nominations, 13B–A3); letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 107, LSP ). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Monroe. Letterbook copy dated...
Letter not found. Ca. 19 August 1793. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 20 Aug. 1793 . Seeks consultation with JM before Monroe departs for a court session (of the state district court that convened at Staunton on 1 Sept.).
It is not known that the British govt. has accepted the mediation of Russia; nothing has been receved from our ministers employed under it; and no intimation to that effect has been communicated to this govt., either from the Emperor of Russia, or from the British govt. Early accounts, after the appointment & departure of our Envoys, indicated the rejection of that friendly overture, & altho...
¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. 3 February 1823 . Described as a three-page autograph letter, signed, listed for sale in the Charles Hamilton Catalogue No. 103 (24 Feb. 1977), item 161, summarized and abstracted as follows: “dealing with a post for Madison’s nephew, a constitutional matter concerning grants of power in which he is in apparent disagreement both with Madison and...
I returnd to the city lately to receive our old friend General La Fayette, who after remaining here a few days, set out on Saturday for Yorktown. He has I presume reachd that port by this time. He is in good health & spirits, and less alterd in his form, than I expectd, and not at all in his mind, unless by improvment. He appears to me to have a profound knowledge of mankind, & of the present...
My affairs in Albemarle, requiring my attendance there, again, before the meeting of Congress, & the Phisician deeming the exercise useful to Mrs Monroe’s health, we have resolvd to set out thither in a few days, & to call on you & Mrs Madison on the route. If we go by Loudon, which is not decided, it may be the last of the week (next) before we see you; but if we go direct, about the middle....
I have the pleasure to inform you that I had an interview with Mr. Fox yesterday, in which we conferred on all the interesting topicks depending between our governments. The result was as satisfactory in respect to his own views as his more early communications had promised, and gave a prospect more favorable of the disposition of the Cabinet generally than I had anticipated. The substance of...
The duties preparatory to the meeting of the Genl. assembly prevented an earlier appropriation of the 300. dolrs. sent you by Major Coleman. You will now receive a letter for Mr. Livingston informing him that you have been so kind as charge yourself with that sum as a fund for the payment of two swords which he is requested to purchase for this commonwealth. I must trouble you with another...
From every thing I can hear Mr. Merry is a worthy candid man, & I hope you will find him reasonable & have an easy time with him. I think it will have a good effect to apprize him of the manner in wh. I have spoken of my reception here, as of the sincerity of my desire to promote the objects of our govt. in promoting peace &ca. A like course may be equally useful with Mr. Pichon to whom I...
§ From James Monroe. 16 December 1814, War Department. “The Senate having declined confirming the promotions of Captains Graham & Massias of the 1st. Rifle Regiment, the confirmation of the other promotions in the Rifle Regiment, conformably to the list now before the Senate, would be irregular. I have, therefore, the honor, in lieu of it, to propose the enclosed list.” RC and enclosure ( DNA...
I arrived here this morning at 8 OClock, and have been since within 4 miles of Benedict, at Butler’s mill, where it was reported the enemy, on their march, had arrived. The report was unfounded. The enemy landed yesterday at Benedict, and had advanced their pickets, within a mile and a half of that mill, for security only. From a height, between that mill and the Patuxent, I had a view of...
I regret to have to inform you of the death of Mr Wm. Burwell which took place on yesterday, after a long illness. He was a virtuous man & good member. The treaty with spain has been ratified unconditionally by her govt., & the grants annulld in the instrument of ratification. It is now before the Senate on the question whether it shall be accepted, the time stipulated for the ratification...
I return you mr Jefferson’s letters, having shewn them to mr Dallas. I enclose some letters from mr Pinkney in one of which he is joined by mr Nicholson. As the communication is of a delicate nature, I do not wish them to be returnd here till about thursday next, as I leave town to morrow for Loudoun & may not get back till wednesday evening. When returnd, note, them as private. I see nothing...
I have yours of the 6th. I am willing & ready to act in either character alluded to. The effect on public opinion would be greater, if indeed any useful effect might be expected from it, by appointing me to command, than merely making a visit to the country. In the latter case, I would do every thing in my power to promote an organization of the forces, to digest their plan of operations, &...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the Eleventh inst, requesting the President to communicate to the House any information in his possession and which it may not be improper to divulge in relation to the omission or refusal of the French government to accredit the Minister Plenipotentiary sent by the United States to that Court, or of...
I shall not be able to get from this place so soon as I expected. You well know how much is to be attended to at such a time preparatory to my departure from the city. I send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, which will unfold to you, our views on the whole subject. I wish you to shew this paper, & the Russian document to Mr Jefferson, in confidence, when you see him. Your friend RC (...
I arrived on saturday so much fatigued that I found it was impossible to proceed by the route of Albemarle & Loudon back to Washington. A slight injury wh. I recd. in descending from the stage made the exn. of that project the more inexpedient. I therefore sent up for Major Jas. Lewis in whose hands I propose to leave my affrs. to come down; I expect him to morrow, and hope to adjust them so...
I have receivd yours of the 12th. Since my return home I have recover’d daily from the debilitating effect of my late indisposition, so that I have reason to presume on a thorough restoration in a short time, if circumstances shod. allow me to remain here. I feel however uneasy lest something shod. occur in which my absence might be improper. I am surprised that we hear nothing from our...
Mrs Douglas, with two of her daughters, having intimated their intention to visit Virginia, & to take Richmond, & some of the upper counties, including orange in their route, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction to yours & Mrs Madisons acquaintance. They are of New York, & well respected there, & my nephew Lt Monroe having married one of her daughters, excite a strong motive...
We have had no rain since my arrival here, nor had there been any for some time before. The most discouraging prospect for corn exists, which added to a defective crop of small grain, menaces us with almost a famine. I am glad to hear that the Neptune has enterd the Delaware. Of the Passengers we shall be better informd tomorrow. I send every paper back to the depts. lately receivd except that...
As you will be on the ground or convenient to it for negotiating further engagments on the Mohawk as well as concluding that we have already enter’d into, I commit to you the papers respecting it. You will take such steps as you find necessary in both instances. We hope to see you if convenient on your way to N. York. Let me hear from you in the mean time whilst you remain where you are....
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the House of Representatives, requesting the President to cause to be laid before that House information relative to the duties laid on articles imported from the United States into the British provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick; relative to the duties on articles exported to the United States from the said...
Our last to you was of the first instt. which was sent by original & duplicate by Bordeaux, in which you had copies of our correspondence with Mr. Cevallos to the 28 ulto. Since then we have discussed the question relative to W. Florida, in his last note on which point is a passage relative to France of which I enclose you an extract. Having in our note to him of the 26th. ulto. stated that...
I have recd. yr. communications by Mr. Baring, & shall write you in reply by Mr. Smith who sails the day after tomorrow (son of Genl. Smith) to New York. I shall avail myself of the same opportunity to write the President an acknowledgment of his. The object of this is to make known to you the bearer, a Mr. Herries, who visits our country with a view to make an establishment in the western or...
Mr Serurier presented to me yesterday a copy of his letter of credence from the Emperor reappointing him Minister to the ustates. He read me at the same time the letter accompanying it from the minister of his govt., by which he was instructed to state that his govt. was resolvd to cultivate the most friendly relations with the UStates: that in case they engaged in war, they would respect our...
I enclosed you today from the council chamber a copy of my correspondence with the bankers relative to the 120,000 dolrs. remitted by the late Secry of the Treasury to me at Paris for them, intending to write you fully this afternoon on that & some other subjects, but am prevented by compy. I have the original letters of the bankers, and other papers referr’d to in that correspondence, which I...
I quartered last night near charlotte Hall, and took a view this morning at 8 oClock, from a commanding height, below Benedict Creek, of all the enemy’s shipping near the town and down the river, to the distance at least, of 8 or 10 miles. I counted 23 Square rigged vessels. Few others were to be seen, and very few barges. I inferred from the latter circumstance that the enemy had moved up the...
I lately receiv’d the inclosed, from a gentleman residing in Bladensburg, who applies, for the professorship, held by Mr Long, in case he should accept that, wh. it is reported, has been offered to him, in the University of London. I have inform’d him, in reply to his letter, that I did not know, that the offer had been made to Mr Long, or if made, that he would accept it, but that I should...