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I requested Colo. Burr to inform you immediately after the recit of yours of augt. 9th that I was not satisfied with the explanation given by it of yr. preceding one of the 4th, since wh. my mind & time have been devoted to other objects claiming with me a priority of attention. It was not my intention to make the subject into the discussion whereof I was drawn by you upon my arrival, a...
[ Albemarle, Virginia, January 1, 1798. In January, 1798, Hamilton wrote to Monroe and referred to “your letter of the first instant.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, August 4, 1797. Letter listed in dealer’s catalogue. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Stan V. Henkels, Jr., April 21, 1891, Item 393-H.
Upon not receiving any answer to my first information and observing the enimy inclining toward your right I thought it adviseable to hang as close on them as possible—I am at present within four hundred yrds of their right—I have only about 70 men who are now fatigued much—I have taken three prisoners—If I had six horsemen I think If I co[ul]d serve you in no other way I shod in the course of...
[In the letterpress edition this letter was erroneously identified as being from James Monroe to George Washington.] May I take the liberty of our former acquaintance to confer with you freely upon the following propositions—You seem’d satisfied with those presented to the view of Congress on friday by Colo. Grayson viz. that exports be admitted down the Missisippi to N. Orleans as an entrepot...
I take the liberty to submit the enclos’d to your perusal. It was written before the meeting of the late Convention, but being inaccurately printed and delay’d in the press untill the week it assembled, it was for those reasons at that time suppressed. Had not the propriety of making my sentiments known upon a late occasion, suggested this mode, in that situation it would have remain’d. Having...
Having casually heard that it was requested by many of Col. Hamilton’s political associates, that you would nominate him as Envoy to the Court of Great Britain, and as I should deem such a measure not only injurious to the public interest, but also especially so to your own, I have taken the liberty to express that sentiment to you & likewise to observe farther, that in case it is your wish I...
My letter of the 8th, and to which I was on the succeeding day honored with a reply, was written in the belief that great exertions were made to convince you that it was the general wish of the community Colo. Hamilton should be appointed Envoy extra[ordinar]y to G. Britain upon the present occasion. As I knew that this was not the case, but on the contrary was persuaded that a great majority...
I was presented yesterday evening by Mr Randolph with the commission of Minister for the French republick, which you were pleas’d with the approbation of the Senate, to confer on me. As I had previously intimated to him in consequence of a conversation I had with him the day before the nomination was presented, that I would accept this trust, I have only now to request that you will consider...
I had the pleasure some weeks past to receive your favor of the 25. of June and should have answered it sooner, had any safe private opportunity offered for Bordeaux from whence vessels most frequently sail for America. I called the evening after its receit on Mr Morris, & put your letter for him into his hands so that he recd it unopened. He left this about the beginng of octr for...
Your favor of the 5. of June did not reach me till a few days past or it shod have been sooner answered. I am happy now to answer it because I am able to give you details of the Lady in question which will be very agreeable to you. I had advanc’d her near 2000. dolrs when I was advised here by Jacob Van Staphorst that you had placd in the hands of his brother for Madame La Fayette the sum of...
You will decypher this by the publick cypher in the hands of the Secry of State. A letter from you to Gr Morris inclosed to Mr Deas has fallen by some accident into the hands of the Directoire. It contains five or six pages. Is said to be very confidential, authorizing communications with Lord Grenville, &c. The person who told me of it and who read it, says it has produced an ill effect. He...
You will pardon the liberty I take in writing you upon a subject wh. has no relation to the publick interest when I inform you I am induc’d thereto merely from a principle of gratitude to make acknowledgment for the personal service I have recd from yr Excellency. The introduction you gave me some time since to this State, for the purpose of attaining some military appointment to place me in...
I enclose you a cypher which will put some cover on our correspondence. We have yet only 5. States, & not a man from the Eastward except Mr. Holton. There is nothing new without doors, wh. I have not communicated to the Governor &, of those within I must defer writing you, untill the next post; the present is certainly an important crisis in our affairs, but as I shall write you very fully by...
You recd. I hope by the last post a small cypher from me. At fort Stanwix you were necessarily acquainted with the variance which had taken place between the Indian Commissioners of the U. States , & those of New York as well as of the principles upon which they respectively acted & the extent to which they carried them: as I reach’d N. York about eight days after you had left it & the Ind:...
I enclose you a paper wh. will give you a state of the representation of the States, beside wh. little else hath taken place worthy yr. attention. Mr Jay is here & will I understand accept the office of foreign affrs. upon condition Congress will establish themselves at any one place. The conduct of Spn. respecting the Mississippi &ca. requires the immediate attention of Congress. The affr. is...
I have recd. yr. favor of the 27. of Novr. in answer to mine of the 15th. My last gave you the state of the representations here. The business of importance is still before committees or if reported not yet acted on. It seems to be the Genl. sense of Congress to appoint a minister to the Ct: of London & to give him instructions upon many subjects & particularly those wh. arise in the conduct...
Yours of the 4th. inst. I have recd. Congress are now closely engag’d in very important business. Reports upon our affairs with G. B. Spain & our foreign affrs. in general have been presented & alternately acted on. To adjust the points of variance between us & the former Court . It seems to be the general opinion that a Minister shod. be sent there, that it would tend to conciliate the...
I have lately heard nothing from you nor indeed from Richmond. I shod. suspect it arose from the adjournment of the Assembly, if I did not presume, had that event taken place, I shd. been instructed to whose care I might address my letters for you in Fredericksburg or Richmond. My letters to Mr Jones have advised you of the principles upon wh. our delegation actd in the questions respecting...
The arrangment in our foreign affairs begins at length to assume some form. Upon whatever ground they were taken up for a considerable time, either with respect to France, Spn. or G. B., the same difficulties arose. If it was mov’d that Dr. Franklin be permitted agreeable to his request to retire home it was firmly oppos’d by R. Island [&] Massachussetts . If that a minister be appointed to...
Your favor of the 12th. of April accompanied with the cypher I receiv’d yesterday. The appointment of Mr. Adams to the ct. of G. B. was soon afterwards succeeded by that of Mr. Jefferson to that of France. Their commns have been some time since forwarded & before this they are no doubt station’d at their respective courts. The removal of the former gave uneasiness to Mr. V[a]n. Berkell but as...
I enclose a copy of the journals so far as they are printed. They contain nothing you will find respecting the requisition nor the commercial interests of the Union. The former upon the report of a committee hath been frequently before Congress of late and as often recommitted, in which state it now lies. As the principal part of the debt which in other States forms a part of the present...
Since my last a report proposing a change in the first paragraph of the 9th. of the articles of confideration hath been taken up & acted on two days in a committee of the whole. It proposes to invest Congress with power to regulate trade externally & internally. Those in favor of it were of opinion that the exercise of this power in the hands of each State, wod. be less advantageous to its...
Yours of the 28th. of July I receiv’d by the last post. The rout from hence to Boston may be effected by stage in 5 days; to Lake George in the same time, thence to St. Johns in three perhaps less, to Montreal one, & thence to Quebec in two, but in the latter instance it must be posted. In either rout you will have no difficulty for the boats and stages are under good regulation. I have been...
I arriv’d last night & found only six States present. Mr. Hancock we hear is on the road & will be with us in a few days. He accepts the chair. The conduct of the legislature, in complying with the requisition of Congress, in the opinion of all here, does the highest honor to the State, and at the same time that it evinces a regard for publick justice & a mind superior to little resentments,...
Your favor of the 9th. reach’d me a few days since. Mine by the last post advis’d you of my arrival here; still I am with out a colleague and the representation of the States, the same. I am perfectly satisfied that the more fully the subject is investigated, and the better the interests of the States severally are understood, the more obvious will appear the necessity of commiting to the U S....
I have recd. yours of the day subsequent to the adjournment of the assembly. Since my last the subject of the impost has been taken up; a report made on it some time last year was recommitted & a report being brought in to the following effect viz: that it be earnestly recommended to the States of New York & Georgia, the only States who have fail’d in some degree or other to comply with the...
In my last I mention’d to you, the subject of the impost was reviv’d & that a report of a Committee had given place to a motion of Mr. Pinckney, the latter being still before the house. The report, and motion with a report from the Bd. of treasury to the same effect have since been committed, in which State the business now lies. I inclose you a paper containing the report. It is doubted...
Letter not found. 16 February 1786. In this letter, mentioned in JM’s letter of 19 March 1786 to Monroe , Monroe proposed a joint purchase of land in the Mohawk Valley from one Taylor. In the letter he also discussed the possibilities of reforming the Confederation and the inadequate powers of the Virginia commissioners if a convention were to undertake such a reform.
I enclose you a copy of Mr. Jay’s publication of the correspondence between him & Mr. Littlepage revis’d and corrected. It may furnish some matter of entertainment. Jersey having taken into consideration the late requisition, the house of delegates resolv’d that having enter’d into the confederation upon terms highly disadvantageous to that State from the necessity of publick affrs. at the...