Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Monroe, James"
Results 1-30 of 991 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have received information that measures, imposing serious restrictions on our navigation and commerce, are taking in the North of Europe, with a view to guard against the disorder called the yellow fever. It is represented that these restrictions are likely to be generally extended in that quarter thro’ the means of a concert, promoted by one of the most influential powers and it is probable...
At a meeting of the Visitors of the Central college held at Charlottesville on the 5th. day of May 1817. on a call by three members, to wit, John Hartwell Cocke, Joseph C. Cabell & Th Jefferson, present James Monroe, James Madison, John H. Cocke, and Th: Jefferson. The records of the trustees of the Albemarle academy, in lieu of which the Central college is established, were recieved from...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. 8. Oct: 1817. Certain letters from Doctor Thos. Cooper to Th: Jefferson, dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors, and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16. they are of opinion that it will be for the interest of the College to modify the terms of agreement which might be...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. held at Charlottesville 7. Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College, known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
Abstract. 15 October 1792. John Taliaferro Brooke, having purchased lot 127 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, from James Monroe and Eliza his wife, conveys that lot to Robert Mercer for £435. Witnessed by JM, John Minor, Jr., and Joseph Jones. Recorded 8 Nov. 1792. Printed extract (Crozier, Virginia County Records: Spotsylvania County , p. 456).
The late Governor of the Commonwealth having thought proper to confide to us the office of Visitors of the Central College near Charlottesville , under an act of the legislature , establishing as it’s patron, the Governor for the time being, we deem it our duty to report to you our proceedings under that appointment, with the progress & prospects of that institution. The want of a seminary of...
at a meeting of the Visitors & c Certain letters from Doctor Tho s Cooper to Th: Jefferson , dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors , and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16.
At a meeting of the Visitors & c held at Charlottesville 7 Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College , known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
8 April 1813, Charleston. “I am directed by Judge Drayton to forward to you, for the information of the President & to receive his determination thereon, copies of certain affidavits & other papers relative to an ⟨a⟩lien enemy.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 94, War of 1812, Records Relating to Prisoners, entry 127-A, box 8, folder 3, bundle 163). RC 1 p. For enclosures, see n. 1. Cochran...
Minutes of an Interview between Colo. Monroe and Colo. Hamilton at Colo. M’s. lodgings in the presence of Mr Church & myself. Colo. Hamilton came about 10 oClk in the morning introduced Mr Church as his brother in law. Colo. H. appeared very much agitated upon his entrance into the room, and observed the cause or motives of this meeting being he presumed pretty well understood, he went into a...
We have the honor of addressing this by our worthy friend, the honorable Mr. Sayre, who was formerly Sheriff of London. The active part, which at the commencement of the revolution, he took in favor of America, is, we presume, too well known to you, to require a relation: and the loss he sustained, in consequence of his opposition to the british ministry, is not less a matter of general...
I do not know what particular fact or circumstance can have given rise to the apprehension lately intimated to you by our friend, which you have been so good as to notice in yours. I will state, the what has occurr’d, between the respectable character alluded to, & me, since you were here, to enable you to judge how far there is just foundation for it. The day before I had intended to set out...
General King of the District of maine [mass:] expressing a desire of being known to you personally, & his intention, to make you a visit, I take much interest in forwarding his views, by giving him this introduction. His uniform support of the republican cause, & useful services, in the late war, are I presume known to you. I hear with great pleasure that your health is completely restord....
We have the honor to inclose the account which Should be annexed to the Convention transmitted you. The Bordeaux embargo is in Assignats, and two thirds will be deducted from many of the others. We have reason to think from a particular account now in our hands there will be Such considerable deductions as will reduce the whole charge to less than 20 millions of livres including the interest....
We have the pleasure to forward to you by Mr. Jay the ratification by the first Consul of the Treaty and conventions, which we concluded on the 30th. of April, with this Republic. We have heretofore forwarded to you the original instruments, and two Copies by different ways, the original by Havre, under the care of Mr. Hughes, who sailed about two weeks since, expressly charged with that...
We have been honored by your favors of the 18th April & the 28th May, as they both relate to measures that might lead to the accomplishment of the Treaty which was executed previous to their arrival no remarks upon them are necessary Except that one idea is held out in the last that Britain interested herself in preventing the possession of Louisiana by France. The fact is that she was totally...
We have the pleasure to transmit to you by Mr d’Erieux a Treaty which we have concluded with the french Republic for the Purchase & Cession of Louisiana. The negociation of this important object was committed on the part of France to Mr. Marbois, Minister of the Treasury, whose conduct therein has already received the Sanction of his Government, as appears by the Ratification of the first...
To all whom these Presents shall concern, Greeting. Reposing especial Trust and confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Ability of John Quincy Adams, at present the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States at the Court of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, James A. Bayard, late a Senator of the United States, Henry Clay Speaker of the House of Representatives of the...
Having thought fit to commit to you the charge of borrowing on behalf of the United States, any sum not exceeding twenty-five millions of dollars, pursuant to the act entitled “an act to authorise a loan for a sum not exceeding twenty-five millions of dollars,” passed on the twenty-fourth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, I do hereby make known to you that in the execution...
To all whom these presents shall concern—Greeting: Reposing special Trust and confidence in the Integrity, prudence and Abilities of Albert Gallatin, late Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate appointed him jointly and severally with John Q Adams, James A Bayard, Henry Clay and Jonathan Russell, Minister...
Whereas it has been represented to me that a certain Sloop, or vessel, called the Fame, whereof Barnabas Haskell was master, did, some time in the year 1814, commit a breach of the act of Congress passed on the 2d of August, 1813, entitled “An Act to prohibit the use of licenses, or passes, granted by the authority of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,” and...
The bearer M r M c Cullock of Baltimore was introduc’d to me by a particular friend there, with a request that I would make him known to you. He is the son of the collector of that port , & represented to have made considerable progress in the knowledge of natural history, for which science he is said to have much taste and a strong passion. He has stud i ed medic i ne in Phil a , & passed the...
Mr Sullivan who will have the pleasure to present you this letter, intending to visit the upper part of our State, & particularly the university, having expressd a desire to be made known to you, I give him with pleasure this introduction. He is the son of gov r Sullivan of Massachusetts with whom you were probably acquainted. With great respect & sincere regard I am dear Sir your friend— MHi .
Letter not found. 11 October 1801. Acknowledged in JM to Monroe, 24 Oct. 1801 . Encloses letter for Robert R. Livingston.
It is not known that the British govt. has accepted the mediation of Russia; nothing has been receved from our ministers employed under it; and no intimation to that effect has been communicated to this govt., either from the Emperor of Russia, or from the British govt. Early accounts, after the appointment & departure of our Envoys, indicated the rejection of that friendly overture, & altho...
A circumstance has occurr’d with which it may be useful for you to be made acquainted , with, merely to put you on your guard. you have doubtless seen a letter publish’d in the gazettes, which is imputed to Gen l Wilkinson & said to be written from this place in 1803. to Mr Power at N. Orleans , requesting him to use the
The delicate state of health which my family has enjoyed of late, attributable as is supposed in a great measure to the atmosphere of London induced me to come here last week. A letter from Lord Mulgrave, which I received just before I left town, having revived the expectation that I should hear from him on the subject of my former ones; I thought it proper to apprize him of my proposed...
I have yours of 19. ulto. I rejoice that my affr. with M. is settled, since being a youth of good heart pushed on by others, I had no wish to injure him, and was satisfied he had none to injure me. In no view cod. I be benefited by a collision with him, & my only concern is respecting Giles, who I hope is satisfied with the paper furnished by Mr. Dawson. I will come up in abt. three weeks at...
¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. 3 February 1823 . Described as a three-page autograph letter, signed, listed for sale in the Charles Hamilton Catalogue No. 103 (24 Feb. 1977), item 161, summarized and abstracted as follows: “dealing with a post for Madison’s nephew, a constitutional matter concerning grants of power in which he is in apparent disagreement both with Madison and...
I returnd to the city lately to receive our old friend General La Fayette, who after remaining here a few days, set out on Saturday for Yorktown. He has I presume reachd that port by this time. He is in good health & spirits, and less alterd in his form, than I expectd, and not at all in his mind, unless by improvment. He appears to me to have a profound knowledge of mankind, & of the present...