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    • Monroe, James
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Monroe, James" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
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Mr Sullivan who will have the pleasure to present you this letter, intending to visit the upper part of our State, & particularly the university, having expressd a desire to be made known to you, I give him with pleasure this introduction. He is the son of gov r Sullivan of Massachusetts with whom you were probably acquainted. With great respect & sincere regard I am dear Sir your friend— MHi .
A circumstance has occurr’d with which it may be useful for you to be made acquainted , with, merely to put you on your guard. you have doubtless seen a letter publish’d in the gazettes, which is imputed to Gen l Wilkinson & said to be written from this place in 1803. to Mr Power at N. Orleans , requesting him to use the
I have yours of 19. ulto. I rejoice that my affr. with M. is settled, since being a youth of good heart pushed on by others, I had no wish to injure him, and was satisfied he had none to injure me. In no view cod. I be benefited by a collision with him, & my only concern is respecting Giles, who I hope is satisfied with the paper furnished by Mr. Dawson. I will come up in abt. three weeks at...
Having written you very fully three days since I have nothing to add at present to the details then given except that in an unexpected rencounter the other day the French have lost 3. ships and by the shameful misconduct of the officers commanding them or some of them. They have in consequence dismissed the Comy. of Marine which I think converts the loss of the ships into a signal victory, in...
Mr. Short being just sitting out for Monticello I am happy to take the opportunity to assure you how sincerely I thank you for the late instance of your kindness and attention to me, which I particularly value as a testimony of your regard for me, and at the same time to assure you that nothing but a series of disappointments in the vessels I had appointed to sail in deprivd me of the...
During the last session of Congress the current business pressed so heavily on me, and after its adjournment, the preparation of instructions for our ministers employed under the mediation of Russia , and in other duties connected with it, kept me so constantly engaged that I have scarcely had a moment of respite since I left you. I seize one to communicate some details, which it may be...
The last communication of our Envoys was the last from you. By it nothing is more obvious than that France intends not to make war on us, so that our admn. has the merit exclusively of precipitating us into that state; if it exists, or takes place hereafter, of wh. there can be little doubt, if there is any of its existence, at the present time. France has been roused agnst us by the admn.,...
The enclosed was written before my late visit to Albemarle , and detaind in consequence of it, to be deliverd in person, but afterwards forgotten and left here. I need not add my sincere desire that you will have the goodness to decide the question to which it relates. we have nothing from abroad, immediately, concerning our own affairs; and no new light as to the result, of the great battles,...
The minister of Russia , Count Pahlen & his brother , having intimated their intention to make you a visit at Monticello , I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. The publick character of these respectable foreigners, would, I well know, secure them your kind reception, & friendly attention, but you will be gratified to know that they have high claims from personal merit. RC (...
I intended to have called on you to day, and had actually set out, but have been compelld to return, by the rain, & still more serious menacing. I shall avail myself of some early occasion. I send the bearer, to enquire, after the state of your health, & that of your family—with my best wishes & great respect MHi .
Since my last but little hath been done in Congress. We have had generally no more than 7. States present. The only time that 9. were their time was employd upon the subject of the Connecticut cession, which ultimately was accepted; whereby she cedes all the land lying westward of a line to be drawn westward of the Pena. line parallel with the same. Our State voted against it but were in...
My St. Croix friends have mentioned that it might reach you, that a Mr. Durant would be more acceptable there as Mr. Yards successor than any other person. The enclosed letter respects the pretensions of another Gentleman for another place and which I have thought expedient to submit to your inspection. Sincerely I am yr. affectionate friend & servt RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 2...
Your letter of the 13. ult o found me at the Shannondale spring, to which I had carried my family on account of the indisposition of M rs Monroe & of our little g d child the daughter of M r Gouverneur. The duties which I had to perform, in this distressing occurrence, which terminated the day before yesterday, in the death of the infant, superadded to those of the office I hold, prevented my...
I have lately received your favors of the 2d. and 21. of March last and by which I find, to my surprise, that only two letters from me and those of the last year had reached you, tho’ I had written one more of the last year and two of the present one. Frouillé as I informed you in one of these was one of the victims of the reign of terror; Dr. Jemm is living and much gratified to find he has a...
The inclosed was left with me by M r Rush , for your opinion, of the propriety of the measure proposed. I retaind it, in the hope of finding you alone, before we separated, for a moments conversation on the subject. The first question is, whether such a notice of the occurrence, which it is proposed to commemorate, is proper, or silent contempt, will be, more expressive, & dignified? You will...
I have had the pleasure to receive yours of Octr. 26. and shall not fail to bring with me the articles mentioned in it from Jones the Instrument maker in Holborn. I am much indebted to you that the sum they will cost on an old account so that that matter will rest of course for the present.   I am very thankful to you for the information given me respecting the state of my affrs. in Albemarle....
On enquiry I found that major Armstead had been regularly appointed principal assessor for our district by the advice of the senate & been furnishd with his commission. It had been intended, as I understood, to appt M r Minor , but the office of Collector , having been disposed of in our county , it was decided on the distributive principle to confer the other office on some person in another...
M r Lawrance & M r Jones, two young gentlemen of New York, lately presented to me by M r Sandford a Senator from that State, & otherwise highly recommended, intending to visit you and M r Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. It is thier object to visit Europe in the Spring & I am satisfied that it will afford them much pleasure, to convey any letters there for you,...
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance the bearer Mr. Voss of Culpepper county, a young man of merit, who has expressd a wish of being personally known to you. He is a lawyer by profession, of respectable standing at the bar, and a fair prospect of becoming eminent if he pursues his profession. He intends making a visit this spring to the south, and hearing that it is proposed to adjust the...
At the request of Mr. Arthur Lee of Norfolk I have given him an introduction to you, but not knowing his object, think proper to mention that I do not, as the contrary might otherwise be inferrd. He is in my opinion a young man of merit, tho it is not founded on much acquaintance with him. He deliver’d an oration not long since which was well spoken of, and is a republican. He is however...
I have just heard it stated here that the suspension of the payments to France was in the first instance by Mr. Short before the commencement of Mr. Morris’s service and without orders from this place and that the latter only conformed to a rule shewn him, implicating strongly that there never had been any direction from this quarter on the subject. This statement was given by Cabot upon an...
I have lately heard with much pleasure of your return in good health to monticello, to which place, I address, this letter. The papers relating to mr dodge partner of the late mr Cathalan, were reciev’d & deposited in the dep t of State. Altho’ no promise was made to him, relation to the office, application to the present time, yet being there, in the discharge of its duties, under the...
I have yours of 21. ulto. and very sincerely thank you for the interest you take in what concerns my welfare, of which indeed I have heretofore had so many proofs as long since to have ceased to make acknowledgments. The cause of irritation to wh. you allude is indeed a serious one, considering the station from whence it emanated: considering the person, only an object of contempt. I had seen...
I receivd with great pleasure your favor of the 29 of march, with a copy of one which you had sent to our friend mr Short, and should not be surpris.d, if the prediction containd in this letter, should be verified, by a rapid succession of events, proceeding from the mov’ment of the french government lately announced in the Speech of the King. when it is recollected that he, his whole family,...
Altho’ it is not yet decided whether I shall sail this fall or not to the UStates, as I most earnestly wish to do, yet I cannot neglect the opportunity by Col: Mercer, to add something to you which it is possible may not be in any other letters. It was my intention as I intimated by Captn. Dulton, to sail immediately after my arrival here, & nothing wod. have prevented it but the seizure of...
Mr Owen intending from motives of respect to pay to you & Mr Madison, a visit, has requested of me a letter of introduction to you, with which I readily comply. His character for benevolence, & improvement in certain branches of industry is I doubt not, well known to you. He indulges a strong hope that the good effect of his system, may be sensibly felt, in improving the condition of mankind....
Upon my arrival here I wrote you and committed my letter to the care of the secretary of Congress who said he would transmit it thro Mr. Morris. I hope you have received it. It gives you a concise account of my late rout to the lakes &c. as well as some observations which I thought worthy your attention in the formation of a commercial treaty with Great Britain respecting Canada . It was late...
my engagment in preparing instructions, for our ministers at gottenburg , Russia , Sweden , & Paris , for M r Clay & M r Russell to take with them, prevented my answering sooner your favor of the 27 th ult
J. M ’s best respects to mr Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send, for his perusal, a late letter from mr Rush , which it may be gratifying to mr Jefferson to see. J. M. will retake it, the next time he calls at Monticello . He hopes that mr Jeffersons health continues to improve. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 17 Sept. 1818 from
I send you by this days mail, the documents of greatest interest, which have been presented to Congress during the present session. on our concerns with Spain we have nothing new, & little reason to expect a minister here from that country, during the session, mr Vives, said to have been appointed some months ago, being under quarantine, within a few leagues of Madrid, in consequence of...