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I was happy to hear by Paul last night, that you had arrived with Mrs Madison, and that your health had been improved by the journey, as I think that mine has. Col: Mercer was with me last night, and suggested some ideas in relation to you, which I wish to communicate to you, for consideration, before you see him, as he will probably call on you this morning. He proposes, at the instance of...
I hope you have enjoyed good health since your safe return home, and that Mrs. Madison has been equally fortunate. You have, I doubt not, found sufficient occupation in domestic concerns, to interest you. Notices from this quarter, will for a while, judging from my own experience, rather interrupt a cherished tranquility, than give pleasure. I should now write you a long letter, if I did not...
Dr. Wm. Thornton who has long enjoyed your good opinion, has expressed a wish that I would also afford him a testimonial of mine, addressed to some friend, to be retained in his possession. To this request, I have willingly acceded, and have presumed, that it might be agreeable to you, and particularly gratifying to him, that it should be addressed to you. I became acquainted with him, before...
I send you by this days mail a copy of the journal of the convention which formd the fedl. constitution. One is allowed by the act of Congress to yourself, to Mr Jefferson & to Mr Adams. Several votes were taken yesterday in the Senate on different propositions, respecting the Missouri question, & it appears that one was adopted by a majority of 4. for the establishment of a line to commence...
A most afflicting event occurrd yesterday, the death of Genl. A: Mason, killd in a duel by Mr McCarty. They fought with muskets. The distress is universal & deep, proceeding from regret at the loss of the highly respected & meritorious individual, & the terrible example it exhibits of party feuds. The debate respecting the proceedings in Florida is still depending, tho’ it is probable that it...
Our troubles with Spain are not ended, nor is it possible to say when they will be. It was hoped and presumed that this minister would have been authorisd to settle every difficulty, but it appears that he came, simply, to ask explanations, and report those given to his government, to amuse, and procrastinate as his predecessor had done. He admits that he is personally satisfied, as to the...
You will receive by this mail a copy of the message in which I have endeavourd, to place our institutions in a just light, comparatively with those of Europe, without looking at the latter, or even glancing at them by any remark. The state of our finances is I presume more favorable, than was generally supposd. It seems probable that it will improve in future, the quantity of goods which...
We came here on thursday last, with intention to proceed on to Albemarle, on Monday next, but such is the state of Mrs. Monroe’s health, that I do not know that it will be possible for her to undertake the journey. The trip here has derangd her whole system, & particularly her nervous system, & head. If she cannot accompany me, I must take her back to Washington, which will be decided in a day...
I enclose you such documents mentiond in your memo: as are to be obtaind from the dept. of war. Those to be found, in the Natil. advocate, will be sent as soon as obtaind. There being no file of that paper, in that dept., they must be looked for elsewhere. I have allowed to Mr. Morris, the expence of his journey from Cadiz to Madrid six hundred dolrs., & a like sum to replace him there, &...
On my return home, which I did, on the day contemplated when we parted, I had the satisfaction to find my daughter & Mr Hay in good health, & to receive letters from Mr Gouverneur advising me, that Mrs Monroe’s health, had improved, & was improving. I hope that you & Mrs Madison have been equally fortunate. I was so much overcome by the heat, & fatigue of the journey in consequence of it, that...
Two dispatches have been lately receivd from Mr. Rush, communicating a proposition from Mr Canning, confidentially made to him, of cooperation between our two governments, in opposing, by reciprocal declaration, in the first instance, a project which he thinks exists, of the holy alliance, to invade the So. american states, as soon as the business with Spain is settled, & which he intimates...
I enclose you a copy of a report of the Committee of the Senate on the nominations respecting which a difference of opinion took place between that body & me, in the manner shewn by its votes in the sequel of the document. The Senate confirmed the nominations in the rank, that is, the grades to which each officer was designated, but rejected the dates from which it was proposed that their...
The enclosed from Mr Rush, which you will return at your leisure, gives the latest intelligence from England, except what is containd in a statment from Mr Maury, of the gradual augmentation of our shipping, beyond that of G. B., in the trade between this country & G. B. I send you a copy of the documents relating to our affrs. with Spain, from a distant date to the last session inclusive....
The bearer Richard H. Lee, a grand son of the revolutionary character of that name, will have the pleasure to present to you this letter. He has been employed in writing the biography of his ancestor, and has thought, as you were an active party to many of the great events of that important epoch, & well acquainted with all, that you might be able, & would give him, very useful information, in...
I have been so much pressd by various duties since the meeting of Congress that I have scarcely had a moment for my friends. The body increases and the number of new members, has added its share to my burdens. The only material fact, that has come to our knowledge since my last to you, relating to the views of the allied powers on So. Am: amounts to this, that the presumption that they would...
Since I have been in this office many newspapers have been sent to me, from every part of the union, unsought, which, having neither time nor curiosity to read, are in effect thrown away. I should have stopped the practice, but from delicacy to the Editors, & expecting also, that they would subject me to no charge. Lately I have been informed that the same practice took place in your time, &...
Mr. Gardner who will have the pleasure to present you this, has through his friend here, for whom I have great respect requested an introduction from me to you which I give him with great pleasure. He is from Long Island in the State of New York, & of the best connections there, & a very respectable young man, of his age. Your attention to him will much oblige me—with sincere regard dear Sir...
I came here in consequence of the very affecting events which have lately befall’n me, to unite the whole family together, for the consolation of all. I indulged also a hope, that by change of scene, and the exercise, my health would be improved. My family think that it has in some degree, but I am little sensible of it. The unfavorable weather, by confining me to the house, has deprived me,...
Young Mr Watson who has been with us, since the vacation, and will call on you on his return home, will give you information of the state of my health, & of that of my family. We hope that yours is perfectly restored, from a slight attack, which he informs us you suffered, at the University, & that Mrs. Madison enjoys good health. I have received a letter from Mr Sparks since I last wrote to...
I send you herewith a more correct copy of the message, than that which I lately forwarded, & to which I add, a copy of the documents, relating to the negotiations with the British govt., for the suppression of the slave trade. You may recollect that one of the items in my acct. for compensation in my last mission to Europe, the 8th., involving the expenses incurr’d in England after my return...
I received yours of the 3d. instt, a few days after our arrival here, and shall profit of the information you have given me, that the meeting of the Visitors takes place, on the 10th. & not the 15th. of next month, at the University, as I had supposed. It is my intention to depart hence, for Loudon, in time to enable me, to make arrangements for the harvest, & other concerns there, & to reach...
The late Governor of the Commonwealth having thought proper to confide to us the office of Visitors of the Central College near Charlottesville , under an act of the legislature , establishing as it’s patron, the Governor for the time being, we deem it our duty to report to you our proceedings under that appointment, with the progress & prospects of that institution. The want of a seminary of...
I find, on conferring with the Secretary of the Treasury, that it will proper for me to appoint a naval officer for the customs at Pensacola, and to allow him one thousand dolrs. pr. annm. salary, with the other emoluments incident to the trust. If you are willing to accept the appointment, I will confer it on you, & will direct the commission to be issued immediately. A sloop of war will sail...
at a meeting of the Visitors & c Certain letters from Doctor Tho s Cooper to Th: Jefferson , dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors , and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16.
At a meeting of the Visitors of the Central college held at Charlottesville on the 5th. day of May 1817. on a call by three members, to wit, John Hartwell Cocke, Joseph C. Cabell & Th Jefferson, present James Monroe, James Madison, John H. Cocke, and Th: Jefferson. The records of the trustees of the Albemarle academy, in lieu of which the Central college is established, were recieved from...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. 8. Oct: 1817. Certain letters from Doctor Thos. Cooper to Th: Jefferson, dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors, and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16. they are of opinion that it will be for the interest of the College to modify the terms of agreement which might be...
At a meeting of the Visitors & c held at Charlottesville 7 Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College , known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. held at Charlottesville 7. Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College, known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...