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I declind answering your letter, untill I could obtain some details, which were material, in relation to its object. The interest, which you take, in favor of persons a family, with whom you are so closely connected, & with whose merit, you are so well acquainted, commands my great high respect & warm approbation, and it would give me much great satisfaction, if circumstances permitted, an...
I have the pleasure to forward to you by the mail of this day, a copy of the journal of the convention, which form’d the constitution of the U States. Congress having appropriated a copy for you, one for Mr. Jefferson, and another for Mr. Madison, I have chargd myself with the execution, of so much of the resolution, as relates to each of you. This instrument–having secur’d to us and to our...
I regret that I could not have the pleasure of seing you again before you left town, which I found that you had done, when I calld yesterday at your lodgings. I wanted to communicate more fully with you, respecting the part I ought to take, in the ceremonies of this day. It is possible you may be in town to day in which I case I may still enjoy that advantage. my particular object in sending...
Mr Sullivan who will have the pleasure to present you this letter, intending to visit the upper part of our State, & particularly the university, having expressd a desire to be made known to you, I give him with pleasure this introduction. He is the son of gov r Sullivan of Massachusetts with whom you were probably acquainted. With great respect & sincere regard I am dear Sir your friend— MHi .
I intended to have called on you to day, and had actually set out, but have been compelld to return, by the rain, & still more serious menacing. I shall avail myself of some early occasion. I send the bearer, to enquire, after the state of your health, & that of your family—with my best wishes & great respect MHi .
Your letter of the 13. ult o found me at the Shannondale spring, to which I had carried my family on account of the indisposition of M rs Monroe & of our little g d child the daughter of M r Gouverneur. The duties which I had to perform, in this distressing occurrence, which terminated the day before yesterday, in the death of the infant, superadded to those of the office I hold, prevented my...
M r Lawrance & M r Jones, two young gentlemen of New York, lately presented to me by M r Sandford a Senator from that State, & otherwise highly recommended, intending to visit you and M r Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. It is thier object to visit Europe in the Spring & I am satisfied that it will afford them much pleasure, to convey any letters there for you,...
I have lately heard with much pleasure of your return in good health to monticello, to which place, I address, this letter. The papers relating to mr dodge partner of the late mr Cathalan, were reciev’d & deposited in the dep t of State. Altho’ no promise was made to him, relation to the office, application to the present time, yet being there, in the discharge of its duties, under the...
I receivd with great pleasure your favor of the 29 of march, with a copy of one which you had sent to our friend mr Short, and should not be surpris.d, if the prediction containd in this letter, should be verified, by a rapid succession of events, proceeding from the mov’ment of the french government lately announced in the Speech of the King. when it is recollected that he, his whole family,...
Mr Owen intending from motives of respect to pay to you & Mr Madison, a visit, has requested of me a letter of introduction to you, with which I readily comply. His character for benevolence, & improvement in certain branches of industry is I doubt not, well known to you. He indulges a strong hope that the good effect of his system, may be sensibly felt, in improving the condition of mankind....
J. M ’s best respects to mr Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send, for his perusal, a late letter from mr Rush , which it may be gratifying to mr Jefferson to see. J. M. will retake it, the next time he calls at Monticello . He hopes that mr Jeffersons health continues to improve. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 17 Sept. 1818 from
I send you by this days mail, the documents of greatest interest, which have been presented to Congress during the present session. on our concerns with Spain we have nothing new, & little reason to expect a minister here from that country, during the session, mr Vives, said to have been appointed some months ago, being under quarantine, within a few leagues of Madrid, in consequence of...
Hearing that mr Webster & mr Ticknor will call on you, and indeed that their visit is principally intended for yourself & mr Madison, I take much interest in recommending them to your kind attention. They are known to the public, as citizens of great respectability & talents, and the latter, is well known to you personally, in those lights, so that little is left to me to add, than to bear my...
The view which you have communicated of the condition, relation, & disposition, of Cuba, & its inhabitants, founded on the information of M r Miralla, is very interesting. It accords also in every particular, with that which has been taken here, aided by all the light which we have been able to obtain, through the most authentic channels, from the Island. The people consider Columbia, too...
I mentiond in a letter which I lately wrote to you, that I had seen in a paper from Richmond, a notice of an application which you had made to the legislature, for permission to sell a large portion of your estate, by lottery, for the payment of your debts, and that I should write you again on the subject. Since then I have been much indisposed, with the influenza, from which, I have not yet...
A man of whom I heard you speak lately, as a gardener, to whom you had rented some land below me, called with M r Price, some days since, to rent, a piece of my land, on my saw mill stream. Finding that he was the person of whom you spoke, I observ’d that unless, I knew, that you consider’d him at liberty, to treat with another, I could have nothing to say to him He promised to produce that...
We are still destind to have further trouble with Spain. It was hoped, that the minister lately arrived, would have terminated every difficulty, but it appears that he has come to act the part of his predecessor,—to make complaints, demand explanations & report them to his government, who may take as many years to conclude another treaty, as they did the last. This minister admits, that there...
We have all been very much distressd, of the accounts recently receivd, of the misfortune you have Sustaind, in the fracture of your arm, or at least of one of its bones. We hope that it has not been so Serious, as has been represented, & that you are rapidly recovering from it— This is a moment, as you well know, when, in addition to the heavy cares which bear on me, the calls of the Members...
It was my intention to have called on you this evening, and to have presented in person M r Goodwyn, who will have the pleasure to deliver to you this letter, but have been prevented by the rain. He is a son, of M r P. Goodwyn, a member of Congress, I believe, during your service, in the gov t , as well as mine. Having purchased a part of my land here, he will become your neighbour, and I am...
The enclosed letter from M r Go relating to a subject interesting to you, and your family, I forward it to you with pleasure. we have heard with deep regret, of the afflicting calamity with which you have been visited, but well know that you will not want resources, to meet any disaster, to which, our nature is subject. with our best wishes to M rs Randolph & family, I am Dear Sir very...
General La Fayette left this for York, on saturday, and is I presume, now, near his post of destination. Whether he will proceed thence, by Richmond, to your house, or directly, to charlestown, & Savannah, & return by your residence, he had not decided, when he left us. Time, has produced less waste of his form, since you last saw him, than it does on most men, and none on his mind. His...
It was my intention, as it was my desire, to have communicated to the committee no part of your letter of the 13 th of Jany 1803, announcing my appointment, to France & Spain, and on that principle I acted, at the last Session. From this however, I have been induced to depart reluctantly, by intimations which have been recently given me, by some friends in Washington, that no evidence being...
Major General Brown, who commands the northern division of our army, will have the pleasure to deliver you this letter. He visits Virg a for the purpose, of manifesting his respect & regard for yourself & M r Madison & I gave him this introduction to you at his request. His gallant conduct on the Niagara frontier, in the last war, and his meritorious services, thro’ the whole war, in other...
I regretted very much that my duties here, with the necessity I was under to pass through Loudon & remain there some days, detaind me so long, as to deprive me of the pleasure of seeing you, on my late visit to albemarle. Being informed by M rs Randolph that you intended to return in a fortnight I should have prolongd my stay there for that term, but was compelled to return, to revise the...
I now forward to you a copy of the message, more legible than that which sent by the last mail. I have concurr’d thoroughly with the sentiments expressd in your late letter, as I am persuaded, you will find, by the message, as to the part we ought to act, toward the allied powers, in regard to S o America. I consider the cause of that country, as essentially our own. That the crisis is fully...
The committee to whom the business was committed, have recently made a report on my claims, a copy of which, I have requested a friend at washington, to procure & forward to you. I regret to find, that it has not met my expectation, either in regard to some of the items, or the period at which, interest, shall commence. If for example, money was withheld, which ought to been allowed me, on the...
James Monroe ’s best respects to M r Jefferson — The enclosed communication from Com: Chauncey , having relation to M r Cathalan , is sent for M r Jefferson ’s inspection. J.M. has occasion to refer to the treaty of Ghent
I came home yesterday, & should have called at Monticello this morning, but for an injury I receivd in one of my legs on the journey, which has inflamed it. A few days nurs ing will I hope restore it. I shall call as soon as I can ride out. I hope that you & your family are well, & that the business in which you are engagd has taken a direction satisfactory to you RC ( MHi ); addressed: “M r...
I deeply regret to have been compelled, as you will see by the gazettes, to advertise my lands in albemarle for sale, but in truth the debts which I owe, owing to bad management, bad crops, expensive trusts with incompetent salaries, untill the present, the savings from which, with the most rigid œconomy, will do little more than pay the interest, leave me no alternative. I am too far advanced...
Shortly after the receipt of yours of the 24 th of October, & while the subject treated in it, was under consideration, the Russian minister, drew the attention of the gov t to the same subject, tho’ in a very different sense, from that in which it had been done by Mr Canning. Baron Tuyll, announcd in an official letter, and as was understood by order of the Emperor, that having heard that the...