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At a meeting of the Visitors of the Central college held at Charlottesville on the 5th. day of May 1817. on a call by three members, to wit, John Hartwell Cocke, Joseph C. Cabell & Th Jefferson, present James Monroe, James Madison, John H. Cocke, and Th: Jefferson. The records of the trustees of the Albemarle academy, in lieu of which the Central college is established, were recieved from...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. 8. Oct: 1817. Certain letters from Doctor Thos. Cooper to Th: Jefferson, dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors, and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16. they are of opinion that it will be for the interest of the College to modify the terms of agreement which might be...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. held at Charlottesville 7. Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College, known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
The late Governor of the Commonwealth having thought proper to confide to us the office of Visitors of the Central College near Charlottesville , under an act of the legislature , establishing as it’s patron, the Governor for the time being, we deem it our duty to report to you our proceedings under that appointment, with the progress & prospects of that institution. The want of a seminary of...
at a meeting of the Visitors & c Certain letters from Doctor Tho s Cooper to Th: Jefferson , dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors , and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16.
At a meeting of the Visitors & c held at Charlottesville 7 Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College , known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
General King of the District of maine [mass:] expressing a desire of being known to you personally, & his intention, to make you a visit, I take much interest in forwarding his views, by giving him this introduction. His uniform support of the republican cause, & useful services, in the late war, are I presume known to you. I hear with great pleasure that your health is completely restord....
Mr Sullivan who will have the pleasure to present you this letter, intending to visit the upper part of our State, & particularly the university, having expressd a desire to be made known to you, I give him with pleasure this introduction. He is the son of gov r Sullivan of Massachusetts with whom you were probably acquainted. With great respect & sincere regard I am dear Sir your friend— MHi .
¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. 3 February 1823 . Described as a three-page autograph letter, signed, listed for sale in the Charles Hamilton Catalogue No. 103 (24 Feb. 1977), item 161, summarized and abstracted as follows: “dealing with a post for Madison’s nephew, a constitutional matter concerning grants of power in which he is in apparent disagreement both with Madison and...
I returnd to the city lately to receive our old friend General La Fayette, who after remaining here a few days, set out on Saturday for Yorktown. He has I presume reachd that port by this time. He is in good health & spirits, and less alterd in his form, than I expectd, and not at all in his mind, unless by improvment. He appears to me to have a profound knowledge of mankind, & of the present...
My affairs in Albemarle, requiring my attendance there, again, before the meeting of Congress, & the Phisician deeming the exercise useful to Mrs Monroe’s health, we have resolvd to set out thither in a few days, & to call on you & Mrs Madison on the route. If we go by Loudon, which is not decided, it may be the last of the week (next) before we see you; but if we go direct, about the middle....
I have recd. yours of the 30th Jany. communicating the decision of Mr Lomax, to accept the office of Judge in the Genl. Ct, & proposing to retain the professorship in the University, with liberty to perform the duties of the other trust, till the end of the current session. I entirely concur with you, in the sentiment which you have expressed, which is to comply with his proposal. RC ( MHi :...
I regret to have to inform you of the death of Mr Wm. Burwell which took place on yesterday, after a long illness. He was a virtuous man & good member. The treaty with spain has been ratified unconditionally by her govt., & the grants annulld in the instrument of ratification. It is now before the Senate on the question whether it shall be accepted, the time stipulated for the ratification...
I intended to have called on you to day, and had actually set out, but have been compelld to return, by the rain, & still more serious menacing. I shall avail myself of some early occasion. I send the bearer, to enquire, after the state of your health, & that of your family—with my best wishes & great respect MHi .
I am so far on my route westward, after having extended my tour to the East, as far as Portland, whence I return’d to Dover in N Hamshire, & came thence, by Concord, & Hanover, into Vermont, at windsor, & by montpelier, & Burlington to this place. I visited yesterday Rouse’s point, which is within a few hundred yards of the boundary line. I met her⟨e⟩ Genl Brown, and to morrow we proceed,...
I shall not be able to get from this place so soon as I expected. You well know how much is to be attended to at such a time preparatory to my departure from the city. I send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, which will unfold to you, our views on the whole subject. I wish you to shew this paper, & the Russian document to Mr Jefferson, in confidence, when you see him. Your friend RC (...
Mrs Douglas, with two of her daughters, having intimated their intention to visit Virginia, & to take Richmond, & some of the upper counties, including orange in their route, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction to yours & Mrs Madisons acquaintance. They are of New York, & well respected there, & my nephew Lt Monroe having married one of her daughters, excite a strong motive...
Your letter of the 13. ult o found me at the Shannondale spring, to which I had carried my family on account of the indisposition of M rs Monroe & of our little g d child the daughter of M r Gouverneur. The duties which I had to perform, in this distressing occurrence, which terminated the day before yesterday, in the death of the infant, superadded to those of the office I hold, prevented my...
In the proceedings of Congress there is little interesting as yet. Some question will probably be brought forward respecting the affrs. of the Spanish colonies, in some form, with intention to bring into discussion, the conduct of the government towards them, thro’ the whole of their contest with Spain, & more particularly within the last year. The recognition of Buenos Ayres, as an indept...
I lately receiv’d the inclosed, from a gentleman residing in Bladensburg, who applies, for the professorship, held by Mr Long, in case he should accept that, wh. it is reported, has been offered to him, in the University of London. I have inform’d him, in reply to his letter, that I did not know, that the offer had been made to Mr Long, or if made, that he would accept it, but that I should...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Senate has confirmd the nomination of Mr. Conway, to a land office in Alabama, as valuable in point of profit, as I am assur’d, tho’ not that, for which you recommended him. Of this be so good as to inform Mr Catlet Conway your neighbour. The vacancy at Petersbg. gave me great embarrassment, as to the person, to be selected for it. Dr. Field had...
I have yours of the 22d. ulto., communicating the purport of a letter to you, from H. Lee, at Nashville, of Augt. 24. with an extract from him, of a letter to him from Genl. Armstrong, respecting his provisional order to Genl. Jackson, of July 18. 1814., to take possession of Pensacola, on certain conditions, as to the presum’d cause, of the delay, in the transmission of that letter, and the...
The enclosed from Mr Rush, will give you a view of our present relations with England. Retain them till we meet, which I expect will be next week. The meeting of the visitors, is to be, I understand, then, in which, we shall expect to see you, if not we shall have the pleasure of se[e]ing you at your own house as we go to Washington, which we propose doing next week. We hope that you are all...
I find that I omitted to send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, yesterday, as I intended, & therefore, now enclose it. Perhaps I have sent some other paper, in which case be so good as to retain it till we meet. Sincerely yours RC ( DLC ).
M r Lawrance & M r Jones, two young gentlemen of New York, lately presented to me by M r Sandford a Senator from that State, & otherwise highly recommended, intending to visit you and M r Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. It is thier object to visit Europe in the Spring & I am satisfied that it will afford them much pleasure, to convey any letters there for you,...
I send you herewith the principal documents which have been printed since the commencment of the Session. Should any be omitted, or should there be any information on any point not touched by them, which you may desire, or [ sic ] being so advised, I will communicate it. The Missouri question, as it is call’d, still engages the attention of Congress, & will probably do it, much longer. The...
General King of the district of Maine in Massachusetts, being desirous, of making you a visit, I take much pleasure in promoting his wishes by giving him this introduction to you. His steady & firm attachment to the principles of our govt., & support of it, in the late war, by very meritorious services, are known to you. I hope that you derive no inconvenience from this severe attack of cold...
Permit me to present to your acquaintance Mr Owen, who proposes to make a visit to you & Mr Jefferson. Of his character for benevolence & useful improv’ments I need say nothing to you. With sincere regard dear Sir yours RC ( DLC ).
The late session, considering the flourishing & happy condition of the country, has been unusually oppressive on every branch of the Executive dept. There have been more calls for information, than I recollect to have been made at any former session, and in some instances, with a portion of the H. of R. a very querulous spirit has been manifested. The questions, involving the right in...
The unfavorable state of the weather since my arrival here, has kept me so much confind, that I have been unable, to pay, that attention to my affairs, that I should otherwise have done. I shall however be with you in the course of the insuing week. I send you a letter from Judge Nelson, & two from Mr. Appleton, which give the latest accounts, from them, of affairs in Spain. I send you also,...
I have lately heard with much pleasure of your return in good health to monticello, to which place, I address, this letter. The papers relating to mr dodge partner of the late mr Cathalan, were reciev’d & deposited in the dep t of State. Altho’ no promise was made to him, relation to the office, application to the present time, yet being there, in the discharge of its duties, under the...
Mr. Livingston intimated to me some time since, his desire to hold with you and Mr. Jefferson, the same relation which he held in 1798., & that I would communicate that sentiment to you on his part, & apprize him of the result. I think that I informd you that Mr Conway had been appointed to a land office in Alabama. Having communicated to Mr. Jefferson, the views taken in the admn., respecting...
I receivd with great pleasure your favor of the 29 of march, with a copy of one which you had sent to our friend mr Short, and should not be surpris.d, if the prediction containd in this letter, should be verified, by a rapid succession of events, proceeding from the mov’ment of the french government lately announced in the Speech of the King. when it is recollected that he, his whole family,...
Mr Lawrance & Mr Jones of New York, young gentlemen of merit, well connected there, expressing a wish to visit you & Mr Jefferson, I have felt it due to the introduction they have presented me, to make them known to you. They intend to visit Europe in the Spring, & will I am satisfied, take much interest in bearing any letters from you, or being in any respect useful to you. With great respect...
Mr Owen intending from motives of respect to pay to you & Mr Madison, a visit, has requested of me a letter of introduction to you, with which I readily comply. His character for benevolence, & improvement in certain branches of industry is I doubt not, well known to you. He indulges a strong hope that the good effect of his system, may be sensibly felt, in improving the condition of mankind....
Since the receipt of your last letter, application has been made to me, from citizens at Leesburg to know if I would act in the convention if elected, stating certain data, to which they were attached, with an intimation that they concluded that I was so likewise. I answered that altho’ there were many considerations, to induce me to remain at home, that I nevertheless, would act, if elected,...
J. M ’s best respects to mr Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send, for his perusal, a late letter from mr Rush , which it may be gratifying to mr Jefferson to see. J. M. will retake it, the next time he calls at Monticello . He hopes that mr Jeffersons health continues to improve. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 17 Sept. 1818 from
I send you by this days mail, the documents of greatest interest, which have been presented to Congress during the present session. on our concerns with Spain we have nothing new, & little reason to expect a minister here from that country, during the session, mr Vives, said to have been appointed some months ago, being under quarantine, within a few leagues of Madrid, in consequence of...
Hearing that mr Webster & mr Ticknor will call on you, and indeed that their visit is principally intended for yourself & mr Madison, I take much interest in recommending them to your kind attention. They are known to the public, as citizens of great respectability & talents, and the latter, is well known to you personally, in those lights, so that little is left to me to add, than to bear my...
The view which you have communicated of the condition, relation, & disposition, of Cuba, & its inhabitants, founded on the information of M r Miralla, is very interesting. It accords also in every particular, with that which has been taken here, aided by all the light which we have been able to obtain, through the most authentic channels, from the Island. The people consider Columbia, too...
I mentiond in a letter which I lately wrote to you, that I had seen in a paper from Richmond, a notice of an application which you had made to the legislature, for permission to sell a large portion of your estate, by lottery, for the payment of your debts, and that I should write you again on the subject. Since then I have been much indisposed, with the influenza, from which, I have not yet...
A man of whom I heard you speak lately, as a gardener, to whom you had rented some land below me, called with M r Price, some days since, to rent, a piece of my land, on my saw mill stream. Finding that he was the person of whom you spoke, I observ’d that unless, I knew, that you consider’d him at liberty, to treat with another, I could have nothing to say to him He promised to produce that...
I am anxious to know the state of your health, & whether it is such, as will enable you to attend the convention. I most earnestly hope that you will be able to attend it, for if I go, I shall be much gratified to meet you there, and whether I do or not, I am satisfied that your presence, altho you might take no part, in the discussion, would have a very useful effect. My health since, we...
I enclose you a copy of the letter to Genl. Jackson, of the 21st of octr. 1814. requested in your last of the 16th ulto. The papers mentiond in that letter were recd— I send you one from Mr Ingersoll, relating to your late communication, of your views, respecting the power of the Genl. govt. to encourage domestic manufactures, in reply to which, I assurd him, that I fully concurrd in the...
We are still destind to have further trouble with Spain. It was hoped, that the minister lately arrived, would have terminated every difficulty, but it appears that he has come to act the part of his predecessor,—to make complaints, demand explanations & report them to his government, who may take as many years to conclude another treaty, as they did the last. This minister admits, that there...
Col: Sullivan having intimated to me his intention to visit our University, and other parts of Virga., with his Lady, and to call on you and Mrs. Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction to your acquaintance. He is the son of the late govr. Sullivan of Massachusetts, & was the Secretary of Mr. Bowdoin in his mission to Spain, in 1805., in which character, I then became...
I have been detain’d here longer than I had expected that I should be, but hope & presume that I shall, after attending the court to morrow get as far as Judge Nelson’s in the evening, & be with you tolerably early the next day. I wish you to examine the subject between the Senate & me, respecting military nominations, that we may confer on it when we meet. I send you the material papers, the...
Mr Vaughan, with whose character you are I presume well acquainted, left this city lately on a visit to Mr Jefferson, & yourself, by Norfolk & Richmond, having much desire to see him once more, & to become personally acquainted with you, before, he returns to Kennebeck in Maine, to remain stationary the residue of his days. He was the confidential friend of the M. of Landsdowne & Dr Franklin...
I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 2d. yesterday. We shall set out to morrow & be with you the day after. I am much pushd by many important concerns to get to Washington as soon as possible, but will certainly remain a day with you. Mr Crowninshield has resignd, & that dept., suffers, most essentially in some interesting circumstances. I have thoughts of offering it to Mr Snider...
I receiv’d at Washington your letters respecting Mr. Lehre, Mr R. B. Lee & Mr Scott, and in consequence of the pressure of business there, declind answering them, untill after my arrival here. I had made up my opinion while in So. Car: in favor of Mr Pringle, who is a republican, President of the State Senate, and without being a very popular man, respected by all. The opposing candidates were...