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I have to acknowledge three letters from you, of the 8 th 13 th & 15 th of this month . The note, in the first, of the different kinds of wines, to be procur’d in France & Italy , and of the persons to be applied to for them, will be of great service to me. I shall immediately profit of it, and shall be very glad, to be able, to render you, any service by extending the order, to such as you...
I hope you have enjoyed good health since your safe return home, and that Mrs. Madison has been equally fortunate. You have, I doubt not, found sufficient occupation in domestic concerns, to interest you. Notices from this quarter, will for a while, judging from my own experience, rather interrupt a cherished tranquility, than give pleasure. I should now write you a long letter, if I did not...
I have decided to comply with your summons, and shall be with you at the time appointed. RC ( MHi ); endorsed by TJ as received 30 Apr. 1817 and so recorded in SJL .
At a meeting of the Visitors of the Central college held at Charlottesville on the 5th. day of May 1817. on a call by three members, to wit, John Hartwell Cocke, Joseph C. Cabell & Th Jefferson, present James Monroe, James Madison, John H. Cocke, and Th: Jefferson. The records of the trustees of the Albemarle academy, in lieu of which the Central college is established, were recieved from...
I enclose you the letter to Mrs Madison, which I omitted to take with me on my late visit, as I intimated to you, while at your house. Mr Correa came here, the day after I set out on my late trip. This visit was to counteract the anticipated mov’ments of the Pernambuco, ambassador, whose arrival, he was taught to expect from accounts receivd thence. No such person has yet arrivd. Mr. C. has...
I regret that I could not have the pleasure of seing you again before you left town, which I found that you had done, when I calld yesterday at your lodgings. I wanted to communicate more fully with you, respecting the part I ought to take, in the ceremonies of this day. It is possible you may be in town to day in which I case I may still enjoy that advantage. my particular object in sending...
I am so far on my route westward, after having extended my tour to the East, as far as Portland, whence I return’d to Dover in N Hamshire, & came thence, by Concord, & Hanover, into Vermont, at windsor, & by montpelier, & Burlington to this place. I visited yesterday Rouse’s point, which is within a few hundred yards of the boundary line. I met her⟨e⟩ Genl Brown, and to morrow we proceed,...
I arriv’d here the day before yesterday on my way to Sacketts harbour , & thence to the westward, in completion of the tour, of which I advised you, that I had, in contemplation, before I left washington. I have been, Eastward, as far as Portland , and after returning to Dover in N. Hamshire , have come on here, by Concord , & Hanover in that State, & windsor , Montpelier
at a meeting of the Visitors & c Certain letters from Doctor Tho s Cooper to Th: Jefferson , dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors , and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16.
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. held at Charlottesville 7. Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College, known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
At a meeting of the Visitors & c held at Charlottesville 7 Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College , known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. 8. Oct: 1817. Certain letters from Doctor Thos. Cooper to Th: Jefferson, dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors, and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16. they are of opinion that it will be for the interest of the College to modify the terms of agreement which might be...
James Monroe ’s best respects to M r Jefferson — The enclosed communication from Com: Chauncey , having relation to M r Cathalan , is sent for M r Jefferson ’s inspection. J.M. has occasion to refer to the treaty of Ghent
our carriage is come, and we set out, in the morning, for washington . I intended to have been with you to day, but I have been immersed , thro the whole day, in the most interesting business, & have only, the remaining hour or two, to pack up my papers her e , for the journey. I fear I have mislaid the memo: which I took, of the person, you wish’d to have appointed, consul in one of the ports...
Our carriage arrivd sooner, somedays, than we expected, in consequence of which, and other considerations, connected with affrs at Washington (our horses also hir’d), I am forc’d to hurry on there. It was our intention to have been with you last night, but hearing that Mr Bagot is with you, we are under the necessity, on account of our equipment, our baggage being sent on, by Richmond, to...
I have been since my return here, so incessantly engaged in the most interesting business, that I have not had a moment to say any thing to you. I am now engaged in preparing the message for Congress, whose meeting is so near at hand, that I shall I fear be badly prepard. The question respecting canals & roads is full of difficulty, growing out of what has passd on it. After all the...
You know so much of the nature of the pressure, to which I am subjected, at this time, that you will excuse my not giving an earlier answer to your letter of the 9th. The documents relating to Galvestown & amelia Island, publishd in this days paper, will reach you with this. They shew the reasons which operated with the Executive in taking the measure noticd in your letter. They appear’d to be...
Some days elapsed, after the receit of your letter of the 13. , before I could fulfill the injunction, of affording M r Mercer an opportunity of perusing, or, it, would have been returnd, immediately with my signature. I had nothing to alter in, or to add to it. I hope and think, that it will succeed, in placing the university , where it ought to be; & that, by means, of that institution, the...
The late Governor of the Commonwealth having thought proper to confide to us the office of Visitors of the Central College near Charlottesville , under an act of the legislature , establishing as it’s patron, the Governor for the time being, we deem it our duty to report to you our proceedings under that appointment, with the progress & prospects of that institution. The want of a seminary of...
In the proceedings of Congress there is little interesting as yet. Some question will probably be brought forward respecting the affrs. of the Spanish colonies, in some form, with intention to bring into discussion, the conduct of the government towards them, thro’ the whole of their contest with Spain, & more particularly within the last year. The recognition of Buenos Ayres, as an indept...
I enclose you a commission for M r Sasserno , as consul for Nice , with a memo: from the dep t of State , relating to its transmission to him, respecting which, we shall be happy to forward your views. I enclose you also an extract from a letter of Gall M r Gallatin , relating to M
The late session, considering the flourishing & happy condition of the country, has been unusually oppressive on every branch of the Executive dept. There have been more calls for information, than I recollect to have been made at any former session, and in some instances, with a portion of the H. of R. a very querulous spirit has been manifested. The questions, involving the right in...
I send you within two papers which will give you the most full & correct information of the views of the allies respecting So. America, that we possess; I mean more particularly that which bears date at Moscow. Its authenticity may be relied on, as we are assur’d, by Mr Erving, by a later letter, than that which accompanied it. You will keep both till we meet, but when that will be, I cannot...
I had the pleasure to see Mr Todd, just before I came here, and requestd him to inform you, that some delay would necessarily occur, before I could leave the city for the summer. That I should remain here, till we heard from Genl. Jackson, on which I should return to the city, then back here, & then proceed by your house to Albemarle. In truth, besides the motive for delay, to avail my self of...
I have this moment receivd yours of the 17., & shall do every thing in my power, to reach your house, by the day mentiond, tho’ I have little hope of it. We have met every day, one excepted, since my arrival here, on the business of the Spanish posts taken in Florida by Genl Jackson. Onis has demanded whether they were taken by order of the govt.? if not, that they be surrender’d & the Genl....
I shall not be able to get from this place so soon as I expected. You well know how much is to be attended to at such a time preparatory to my departure from the city. I send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, which will unfold to you, our views on the whole subject. I wish you to shew this paper, & the Russian document to Mr Jefferson, in confidence, when you see him. Your friend RC (...
I expected long before this to have had the pleasure of seeing you in Albemarle , but the necessity of being here, on the receit of Gen l Jackson ’s report, of his operations in Florida , & in the expectation of the return of our commiss rs from Buenos Ayres , whom I wishd to meet, detaind me in Loudoun till lately, when on the occurrence of both events I returnd to the city. The occurrence at...
I find that I omitted to send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, yesterday, as I intended, & therefore, now enclose it. Perhaps I have sent some other paper, in which case be so good as to retain it till we meet. Sincerely yours RC ( DLC ).
I came home yesterday, & should have called at Monticello this morning, but for an injury I receivd in one of my legs on the journey, which has inflamed it. A few days nurs ing will I hope restore it. I shall call as soon as I can ride out. I hope that you & your family are well, & that the business in which you are engagd has taken a direction satisfactory to you RC ( MHi ); addressed: “M r...
I declind answering your letter, untill I could obtain some details, which were material, in relation to its object. The interest, which you take, in favor of persons a family, with whom you are so closely connected, & with whose merit, you are so well acquainted, commands my great high respect & warm approbation, and it would give me much great satisfaction, if circumstances permitted, an...
mr Poinsett , whose name & character are I presume well known to you will have the pleasure of giving you this introduction. He was employd very usefully in S o America , several years, under mr Madison , & had previously travelled thro’ most of the European countries & particularly Russia , by whose Sovereign he was known, & treated with much attention. I expected to have presented him...
Sometime ago you intimated to me a desire to dispose of a small tract of land, which you have between mr Alexander s & my land lying below the Blenhims tract. As this is detatched from your other lands, it is probable, that you may still be desirous of parting from it, and that it may fall into other hands, [which I should regret] without an arrangment between us. If my impression is correct,...
J. M ’s best respects to mr Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send, for his perusal, a late letter from mr Rush , which it may be gratifying to mr Jefferson to see. J. M. will retake it, the next time he calls at Monticello . He hopes that mr Jeffersons health continues to improve. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 17 Sept. 1818 from
The enclosed from Mr Rush, will give you a view of our present relations with England. Retain them till we meet, which I expect will be next week. The meeting of the visitors, is to be, I understand, then, in which, we shall expect to see you, if not we shall have the pleasure of se[e]ing you at your own house as we go to Washington, which we propose doing next week. We hope that you are all...
J. Monroe has the pleasure to submit to mr Jefferson ’s perusal a letter from Judge Bland , on S o american aff rs , which he mentiond to him sometime since. If the weather & mr Jefferson ’s health permit J. M. will be very much gratified by his company to day, with the gentlemen, now at Monticello , who promisd, with Col Randolph , to dine with him to day. RC
I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 2d. yesterday. We shall set out to morrow & be with you the day after. I am much pushd by many important concerns to get to Washington as soon as possible, but will certainly remain a day with you. Mr Crowninshield has resignd, & that dept., suffers, most essentially in some interesting circumstances. I have thoughts of offering it to Mr Snider...
The enclosed from Mr Rush, which you will return at your leisure, gives the latest intelligence from England, except what is containd in a statment from Mr Maury, of the gradual augmentation of our shipping, beyond that of G. B., in the trade between this country & G. B. I send you a copy of the documents relating to our affrs. with Spain, from a distant date to the last session inclusive....
I send you a copy of the documents relating to negotiations with Spain , from a very distant day, to the end of the last Session, which will be interesting to you, tho’ not new, having had the direction of them, in the stage, which formd the outline of what has since followd. Our attitude with the allied powers, in regard to S o Am: , is as favorable, as it well can be, mr Rush & mr Gallatin...
General King of the district of Maine in Massachusetts, being desirous, of making you a visit, I take much pleasure in promoting his wishes by giving him this introduction to you. His steady & firm attachment to the principles of our govt., & support of it, in the late war, by very meritorious services, are known to you. I hope that you derive no inconvenience from this severe attack of cold...
General King of the District of maine [mass:] expressing a desire of being known to you personally, & his intention, to make you a visit, I take much interest in forwarding his views, by giving him this introduction. His uniform support of the republican cause, & useful services, in the late war, are I presume known to you. I hear with great pleasure that your health is completely restord....
I believe I now send you the document you asked for, in the form, you wished it. Mr Gallatin & Mr Rush have formd a treaty with G Britain, by which the commercl. convention is continued for 10. years, the questions of boundary & fisheries are settled, as is that respecting slaves taken in the late war, & Columbia river, but on what conditions, we know not, as the treaty is not yet receivd. The...
I intended on my late visit to albemarle, to have communicated freely with you, on the subject of internal improvement, in reference to the power of the gen l government, especially as to the appropriation of the public money, but circumstances were unfavorable then, to such a communication. my object has been, rather to state certain facts & considerations, which I was compelled to advert to,...
A most afflicting event occurrd yesterday, the death of Genl. A: Mason, killd in a duel by Mr McCarty. They fought with muskets. The distress is universal & deep, proceeding from regret at the loss of the highly respected & meritorious individual, & the terrible example it exhibits of party feuds. The debate respecting the proceedings in Florida is still depending, tho’ it is probable that it...
I was much gratified by your late letter to find that you had recover’d your health, which has since been confirm’d by Edward Coles. The view which you take of the late proceedings in Florida, affords me great pleasure, being that — which we had formed, on the same evidence, and acted, in the measures connected with them. on receiving Gen l Jackson’s report, our attention was directed...
Mr Vaughan, with whose character you are I presume well acquainted, left this city lately on a visit to Mr Jefferson, & yourself, by Norfolk & Richmond, having much desire to see him once more, & to become personally acquainted with you, before, he returns to Kennebeck in Maine, to remain stationary the residue of his days. He was the confidential friend of the M. of Landsdowne & Dr Franklin...
I receiv’d at Washington your letters respecting Mr. Lehre, Mr R. B. Lee & Mr Scott, and in consequence of the pressure of business there, declind answering them, untill after my arrival here. I had made up my opinion while in So. Car: in favor of Mr Pringle, who is a republican, President of the State Senate, and without being a very popular man, respected by all. The opposing candidates were...
I have lately heard with much pleasure of your return in good health to monticello, to which place, I address, this letter. The papers relating to mr dodge partner of the late mr Cathalan, were reciev’d & deposited in the dep t of State. Altho’ no promise was made to him, relation to the office, application to the present time, yet being there, in the discharge of its duties, under the...
I have been endeavouring, while here, to settle my administration on the estate of our friend the late Judge Jones, and believe that I shall accomplish it. The settlement of my account with the estate, is ⟨necessarily?⟩ involvd in the other, & in recurring to former transaction[s], I find, that I must give you, some little trouble in the affair. The two papers enclosed, will explain the...
I receivd your kind letter, with the information, respecting my acct., with the estate of our late friend Mr. Jones, the day after my meeting with the Commissrs.; but they admitted the item on a view of the passage in Mr Yards letter relating to it, & my assurance, that I would withdraw it, if it should not be supported by you. Your letter will be very satisfactory to them, without even a copy...
I send you a copy of the message which has just been sent in to Congress. The affair with Spain has been plac’d on the best ground, that great consideration had suggested, and we hope that it may be managed, in a manner, to secure the object desir’d, without war. I have reason to think, that the efforts of several powers, will be exerted, on that side; those of France, certainly will be; and...