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    • Monroe, James
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    • Madison, James
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Documents filtered by: Author="Monroe, James" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Upon my return home the other day after the close of the Chancery term, I found a letter from you in the post office, wh. had been there for sometime. This will apologize for my not answering it sooner. I am again call’d here, & shall attend untill the last of this month, upon the genl. & court of appeals. Mr. Jefferson we are taught to believe will visit this state in the course of the...
Your favor advising of the passage of the tonage & impost bills by both houses I have recd. It was my intention to have remov’d to Albemarle & attended the Chancery next month thence. But as it will be better to leave Mrs. M. here in that interval than there, where she has comparitively but few acquaintance, have postpon’d our removal untill abt. the 15. of August. The contest between the two...
Your favor of the 27th. ulto. found me in Richmond attending the chancery whence I returnd two days since. We move on monday next to Albemarle having already sent up the principal part of our furniture &ca. You will address to me in future by the way of Richmond. Our delay has been protracted too long to secure us, I fear, from the contagion incident to the lower country; as yet however we...
I flatter’d myself I shod. have been able by this, to have remitted you my proportion of the balance due Mr. Taylor for the land we bought of him—but my endeavors have been ineffectual, nor do any prospects that I have, warrant a hope, I shall be able to command it, within any short period of time. Thus circumstanc’d it wod. be more agreeable to me to disengage myself from the contract....
Letter not found. 19 May 1790. Acknowledged in JM to Monroe, 1 June 1790 . Reports illness of his daughter.
I have just return’d from the chancery court & sit out for Albemarle tomorrow. I shall remain there untill the appeals, abt. the 25. of this instt. This will be given you by Mr. Garnett a worthy & respectable gentn. of this town. He visits New York with commersl. views, & will be benefited by your acquaintance. He will consider any attention shewn him as a proof of my acknowledgment for his...
Your favor of the 17th. of June I have recd. & am sorry to find the most important measures of congress still remaining unsettled & in a very fluctuating state. The assumption will be dislik’d here from what I can learn, under any shape it can assume. Under the discussion it has recd. the publick mind appears to be made up on the subject, & will not readily yeild to any accommodation...
Yours of the 4th of July was the last recd. acknowledging mine by Mr. Garnett. Those of earlier date were answer’d from Richmond. I find you have had before you two subjects only, of consequence latterly, that part of the revenue business wh. respects the assumpsion of the State debts, & the fixing on some places for the tempy. & permanent seats of Congress. The latter we hear has been finally...
I have wish’d to partake with you fully in our mohawk purchase, & with that view have endeavor’d to dispose of property elsewhere, but without effect. As so small a portion therefore is no object with me and the possession of the whole, will make it a more important one with you, if it suited shod. be glad you wod. take it yrself. This disposition wod. suit my arrangments in other respects...
Letter not found. 8 March 1791 Offered for sale by Robert K. Black, Upper Montclair, N.J., 1966, with a catalog notation that the one-page letter concerned “the sale of land.” JM’s reply of 12 Apr. 1791 (DLC) makes it clear that Monroe made an inquiry concerning some books on behalf of “Mr. Brackenridge,” and possibly enclosed a list of the desired volumes.
I forget whether the deed of the Mk. land was made to you singly, or to us jointly, or severally. To the former a rect. specifying the object will do. In the latter case in either instance a conveyance will be necessary—as you are informed will you shape it & give it me for signature. I have no documents here of the State of our account. From memory I mention the following—you paid me in 1786....
I attended on the 15. according to appointment at Richmd. to meet the gentn., my associates, in the revision of the laws, on that business, but found only Mr. Nelson there. Mr. Lee & Mr. Tucker came abt. the 20th. but predisposed not to enter on it at that place. Three days were taken up in occasional consultations about an adjournment to Wmsburg wh. was advocated by the two latter & but...
I returned last night having made a long and fatiguing journey through the rain. Your servant soon after presented to me yr. favor with its enclosures. I sent off on saturday the packet to Dunlap so that on thursday night it will be recd. & may be published on saturday next. I inserted the paragraph I had first written, & made the concln. rather more pointed introducing the extracts, making...
The bearer delivered me the inclosed last night address’d to you and myself from M. Smith and M. Willet of New York. I have prevailed on him to convey it personally to you assuring him that no partial or seperate answer cod. be given. You will find it proposes to substitute Mr. Burr to Govr. Clinton as the candidate of the republican interest, in the contest for the office of V. President....
I have just returned home from an attendance on the courts at Fredbg & Richmond & promise myself repose at least for a short time. I called on Colo. Taylor from whom I enclose you a letter. I found he had been very busily employed upon some subjects of an interesting nature since he reached home. He has written near 60. (56. I believe) folio pages upon the subject of the bank and the funds in...
Letter not found. Ca. 19 August 1793. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 20 Aug. 1793 . Seeks consultation with JM before Monroe departs for a court session (of the state district court that convened at Staunton on 1 Sept.).
I am still doubtful whether I shall visit Fredericksburg this term—if I do will call on you as I go down perhaps on Monday—but I shall in case I do not sit out on that day for Richmond, so that I shall not have the pleasure of se[e]ing you here till the week after. I found at Staunton impressions had been made by letters from Richmd. Mr. M. had written to Gl. Jones who was there to promote an...
I arrived yesterday too late for the post to bear the acct. of it. I found Mrs. M & the child well tho the former had been nearly lost by the sinking of the ice as she came. Mr. Kortright is living & perfectly in his senses, free from pain & perhaps not near his end. He is however on the decline & confined to his room. I find him most friendly & affectionate, but as yet I am not sufficiently...
I have been with Mr. R. & have given him no final answer. The fact appears to be that the message to me was directly from the President, so that a decision settles it. He has also had an interview with Mr. Dayton. May I request of you to go to Mr. Randolph, & settle the matter with him. I promised him you wod. in the course of ½ an hour. If it has not the approbation of my few friends &...
Mr. Madison will be pleased to receive from Genl. Wilkinson, or draw on him for the sum of three hundred dolrs. or thereabouts (due me by him) according as the Genl. shall direct. He will likewise receive whatever is obtained from Genl. Bradley from the sale of our Vermont property, or otherwise from the sale or upon acct. of it. He will likewise be pleased, in case he is applied to, give...
To morrow will make one month since our arrival here, and such have been my ingagments that altho’ I resolved that I wod. begin a letter to you every succeeding day yet when the day arrived it was not in power heretofore. You will readily conceive the variety of the objects to which I have been forced to attend, many of which requiring the utmost effort of my judgment, all delicate and...
Mr. Swan of Boston who has resided for some years past in this city in the character of a Merchant & in which line he has been extensively engaged will present you this. He leaves this for the purpose of purchasing & shipping to this country the productions of ours & relies much on the advances to be made by our govt. for the means. He will I understand be sole agent in that line of this...
By not hearing from you before this I conclude I shall not untill after you shall have commenc’d the session in Phila. Indeed I calculate upon hearing at the same time from Mr. Jefferson and Mr. Jones, for surely they will not decline writing by you to be forwarded thence with your communications. I therefore wait the lapse of sufficient time to bring yr. letters here with that kind of...
I enclose you three letters one for Mr. R. and the other two for whom ever you may think it best to direct them. You will in case they are delivered take a copy of one for yr.self, for I have not had time to write you nor indeed is it necessary on that subject as I send them open to yr. inspection. You will know whether there is any thing in the report & act accordingly either by presenting or...
I have addressed to your care a letter for Mr. R. & two others, to be addressed by you according to circumstances either to Langdon, Burr, Butler, Ross or any other person in case you shod. deem it proper to be presented at all & sent them in a packet by Havre. This which covers one for Mr. R. is to go by Bordeaux. I submit it entirely to you either to present or suppress it as the state of...
I was yesterday favored with yours of the 4th. of Decr. the only one yet recd. I had perfectly an[ti]cipated the secret causes & motives of the western business, and was extremely happy to find that the patriotism of the people in every quarter, left to its own voluntary impulse and without any information that was calculated to stimulate it, was sufficient to triumph over the schemes of...
Being under the necessity of explaining the motives of my conduct upon my arrival, to the Executive, & in consequence of presenting a statmt. of the circumstances under which I acted, I have thought I could not better convey my ideas to you on that head than by enclosing a copy of the paper. This will of course be kept from Mr. R. because of his official station, & all others from whom it...
I was sometime since favd. with yours of the 11. of March being the second since I left America. You were I presume soon after the date of that in possession of several from me, of two more especially which opened fully the state of things here under the impression of Mr. Jay’s treaty, and which state has not been essentially varied since: for as all communication upon the subject of that...
I have recd. from you 3. letters of which that of the sixth of April was the last. Dr. Edwards by whom it was sent has not yet arrived in Paris so that I am yet to receive his communications upon the state of our affairs. The cypher was recd. in this last letter, and by which I have been highly gratified for it will greatly facilitate our future correspondence. Since my last the committee of...
I send herewith a copy of the constitution reported by the committee of 11. & which will be discussed in the course of a few days. A doubt arises with many upon the propriety of the executive organizn., & some wish and with a view of strengthening it that the number be reduc’d to 3—but this wod. certainly produce the opposit effect, for the annual rotation by the with-drawal of one & the...