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Letter not found. 28 April 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Monroe, 13 May 1786 , and Monroe’s letter to JM, 18 May 1786 . Related to the speculation in which Monroe purchased land in the Mohawk Valley for JM and himself. Monroe expressed an interest in taking a journey with JM to see the lands, and discussed odd appearance of two conventions sitting simultaneously with similar powers to...
Letter not found. 16 February 1786. In this letter, mentioned in JM’s letter of 19 March 1786 to Monroe , Monroe proposed a joint purchase of land in the Mohawk Valley from one Taylor. In the letter he also discussed the possibilities of reforming the Confederation and the inadequate powers of the Virginia commissioners if a convention were to undertake such a reform.
As you will be on the ground or convenient to it for negotiating further engagments on the Mohawk as well as concluding that we have already enter’d into, I commit to you the papers respecting it. You will take such steps as you find necessary in both instances. We hope to see you if convenient on your way to N. York. Let me hear from you in the mean time whilst you remain where you are....
I arriv’d here the evening of the day I left you & found Mrs. Monroe & the family well. They desire to be remember’d to you. I think you mention’d you had not recd. the letter I had address’d you in answer to yours before you left Phila., the last from that place. You express’d an uneasiness at failing to command such a sum, as might enable you to furnish me with the sum I advanc’d for you in...
I have been favor’d with yours covering a letter to Mr. Thomson which I shall deliver him in the morning. I am glad you have accepted the appointmt.; if the court shod. sit, wh. is only a probable event, & the arrangment we have in contempletion with respect to the Mohawk shod. succeed I shall be happy to accompany you in a trip here next summer. We have heard nothing from Mr Jay since the...
I had the pleasure to receive yours from Phila. yesterday but so late that I cod. not answer it sooner. I hope you have before this recover’d from yr. fatigue, indeed I advise your prosecution of yr. journey here as soon as possible as the preferable place for that purpose. I shod. be happy you cod. give us as much of yr. time as possible here for reasons more self-interested. Of these we...
My professional duties have taken me from the political scene here, so that I have it not in my power yet to give you any thing in that line of moment. On monday I shall take my seat in the house & soon become in some measure acquainted, I suppose, with the views of parties. Carrington, with whom I was in compy. a few minutes yesterday, complains of a decision of the house by which he was...
I was favor’d with yours of the 14. two or three days past. The apology is rather due from those gentn. to whom it alludes, both to you and me, for their omission, than that they have any cause of complaint. The truth is, I suspect they were more at ease with their commercl. acquaintance, than they would have been elswhere, and are happier in their escape from the attention of others, than it...
Since my last we have been from day to day upon the business wh. engag’d us when you were here. They carried the repeal by 7. States in the Committee of the Whole & afterwards in the house. We mov’d to postpone to take into consideration the plan in conformity with the Idea I suggested to you, in which we enter’d into long reasoning upon the Secrys. project, proving if we were well founded,...
I was favord with yours upon my return a few days since from the districts of Staunton & Charlotte ville—which will apologize for your not hearing from me sooner. The Judges, Mrs. Monroe and our child were of the party, so that you will readily suppose there was some variety in the entertainment. The arrangment of the business of the genl. court, into the districts, having not been...
I arriv’d last night & found only six States present. Mr. Hancock we hear is on the road & will be with us in a few days. He accepts the chair. The conduct of the legislature, in complying with the requisition of Congress, in the opinion of all here, does the highest honor to the State, and at the same time that it evinces a regard for publick justice & a mind superior to little resentments,...
I enclose you a paper wh. will give you a state of the representation of the States, beside wh. little else hath taken place worthy yr. attention. Mr Jay is here & will I understand accept the office of foreign affrs. upon condition Congress will establish themselves at any one place. The conduct of Spn. respecting the Mississippi &ca. requires the immediate attention of Congress. The affr. is...
It wod. have always suited me for you to pay the sum I am in advance for you in New York the last of this or the first or middle of next month as well as by any other disposition I cod. have made of it. Indeed I vision’d it to discharge some small engagments of mine wh. became due there abt. that time. My engagmt. for majr. Pinckney by wh. I am to pay 200 dolrs. here, wh. he will replace in N....
I enclose you a cypher which will put some cover on our correspondence. We have yet only 5. States, & not a man from the Eastward except Mr. Holton. There is nothing new without doors, wh. I have not communicated to the Governor &, of those within I must defer writing you, untill the next post; the present is certainly an important crisis in our affairs, but as I shall write you very fully by...
My leasure furnishes me with the opportunity, but the country around does not with materials to form a letter worthy your attention. The scale of my observations is a narrow one & confin’d entirely within my room: & the subjects of my researches in which I am but seeking to make some proficiency, as I shod. only detail to you the sentiments of others, give me nothing to supply the deficiency....
We have nothing new here. The proceedings of our assembly you are no doubt possess’d of thro’ the hands of the Governor, especially that part which is connected with the US. I mean the revenue act & the resolutions respecting the cession. In the former as much was advancd to the US. as cod. be obtain’d. In the latter more moderation was observ’d than at first appearances promis’d. It was...
Your favor of the 5th. was not presented me untill the day before yesterday, or it should have been answer’d sooner. I think with you the act of Congress respecting the missisippi an acquisition on that side, and therefore an happy circumstance. It must make an impression on the new government, and if the disposition of Spain shod. be what I had reason to believe it was, before the commencment...
We went into a Committee of the Whole yesterday. The subject was discuss’d fully, by Pinckny & others & the house ultimately came to the resolution & reporting that we sit agn. Today being the order for the report of the Committee— in part upon subject of the impost in its relation to Pena. & New York, the order above alluded of going into Committee was postpon’d to take up the sd. report. I...
In my last I mention’d to you, the subject of the impost was reviv’d & that a report of a Committee had given place to a motion of Mr. Pinckney, the latter being still before the house. The report, and motion with a report from the Bd. of treasury to the same effect have since been committed, in which State the business now lies. I inclose you a paper containing the report. It is doubted...
Sometime since I was appointed of the Committee to attend the Pena. Assembly, contrary to my wishes, & not being able to extricate myself (having apologiz’d in the first instance upon Mrs. Monroe’s indisposition which was not admitted in expectation of her better health) am now under the necessity of attending. The question was not as I suppos’d taken upon the whole report of the Committee of...
I arriv’d here a few days since to press on the legislature of this State a seperation of the impost from the supplel: funds. I have the most satisfactory evidence they will reject the proposition. We proceed therefore further merely to discharge our duty. Both parties are united in opposition to it. To morrow we shall be recd. by the legislature. I am sorry I came on the business. Before this...
The arrangment in our foreign affairs begins at length to assume some form. Upon whatever ground they were taken up for a considerable time, either with respect to France, Spn. or G. B., the same difficulties arose. If it was mov’d that Dr. Franklin be permitted agreeable to his request to retire home it was firmly oppos’d by R. Island [&] Massachussetts . If that a minister be appointed to...
I enclose a copy of the journals so far as they are printed. They contain nothing you will find respecting the requisition nor the commercial interests of the Union. The former upon the report of a committee hath been frequently before Congress of late and as often recommitted, in which state it now lies. As the principal part of the debt which in other States forms a part of the present...
Your favor of the 9th. reach’d me a few days since. Mine by the last post advis’d you of my arrival here; still I am with out a colleague and the representation of the States, the same. I am perfectly satisfied that the more fully the subject is investigated, and the better the interests of the States severally are understood, the more obvious will appear the necessity of commiting to the U S....
I have not heard from you lately but hope it hath not arisen from ill-health. Two days since we recd. dispatches from Mr. Adams in which he informs us of his demand of the surrender of the posts, & remonstrance agnst the violation of the treaty also in the instance of the negroes, with the answer of the minister to his memorial. In this answer it is stated that the King admits a violation in...
I have recd. yr. favor of the 27. of Novr. in answer to mine of the 15th. My last gave you the state of the representations here. The business of importance is still before committees or if reported not yet acted on. It seems to be the Genl. sense of Congress to appoint a minister to the Ct: of London & to give him instructions upon many subjects & particularly those wh. arise in the conduct...
Since my last a report proposing a change in the first paragraph of the 9th. of the articles of confideration hath been taken up & acted on two days in a committee of the whole. It proposes to invest Congress with power to regulate trade externally & internally. Those in favor of it were of opinion that the exercise of this power in the hands of each State, wod. be less advantageous to its...
I have lately seen Taylor—he has a right to 4,000 acres of land in an undivided tract of 40.000 which he wishes to sell & will take six shillings pr. acre, ½ at the time of concluding the bargn. & the balance 12. months afterwards. The tract is distinguish’d in the maps by the name of Funda’s patent. It lies near fort Stanwix, adjoins the river above it & runs within two miles of the Mohawk...
You recd. I hope by the last post a small cypher from me. At fort Stanwix you were necessarily acquainted with the variance which had taken place between the Indian Commissioners of the U. States , & those of New York as well as of the principles upon which they respectively acted & the extent to which they carried them: as I reach’d N. York about eight days after you had left it & the Ind:...
Your favor of the 12th. of April accompanied with the cypher I receiv’d yesterday. The appointment of Mr. Adams to the ct. of G. B. was soon afterwards succeeded by that of Mr. Jefferson to that of France. Their commns have been some time since forwarded & before this they are no doubt station’d at their respective courts. The removal of the former gave uneasiness to Mr. V[a]n. Berkell but as...