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2 April 1804, Baltimore. “I have just received from the post office in this City the inclosed letter [not found] dated H. M Ship Leander, signed John Fisher. “The writer states himself, to be a native of Boston; to have been cast away in the Brig Mary, belonging to the port of Boston on the coast of Nova Scotia, and there pressed on board the Leander. He also states that he was appointed in...
I sincerely condole with Mrs. Hamilton and you on the loss which you have sustained in the death of your beloved son Philip. I can well conceive of the distress this event has occasioned, and the tender recollections that his memory must long continue to excite. I lost my eldest child, a daughter, after she had discovered whatever can promise to flattter parental expectations. Is there ought...
I received your letter of the 4th inst on Saturday last. After giving as much consideration as I could to the subject of the election of a President, which I perceived from conversation with some of the members of Congress who were here at christmas was likely to assume a serious form, it appeared to me that the proper line for the federal party to pursue in the case, was, to acquiesce with a...
I have recd. a letter from Mr. W. this morning in which he says. “I have made enquiry respecting the declaration of Mr. Adams while in London in Nov. 1783—it seems he thought negociations could be better conducted there than in a foreign country, and observes—‘Here with the most perfect politeness to ministers we may keep them in awe; a visit to a distinguished member of opposition, even...
What is past and cannot be amended between friends had better be forgotten. Let it be so if you please. I am content. I have since your last reflected upon the policy & necessity of your replying to the answers to your animadversions on the character & conduct of the President, and incline to beleive that it would be wiser to suspend, for the present any further publication on the subject....
I received your letter of the 13 inst yesterday evening. [Altho’ I am not pleased at the facts attached to my name, in your letter to the President, having been brought into public view, without my consent, I can conceive nevertheless what might have prevented you from not requesting it. This supposed reason has weight if the facts could be considered of consequence, still however, in a case...
Mr Wolcott informed me by a letter recd yesterday evening that he was to leave the seat of Government (on a visit to his family) to day. He goes by way of Lancaster & I expect will pass through to New York in which case I pray you to give him the inclosed letter. If any accident should prevent his seeing you, be pleased to send it to him. It will shew you what I think of things here and my...
I recd. this morning your letter dated the 27 Ulto. with the one at first intended for Major Jackson. I sincerely beleive that there is not one of your friends who have paid the least attention to the insinuations attempted to be cast on the legitimacy of your birth, or who would care or respect you less were all that your enemies say or impute on this head true. I think it will be most...
In Maryland from causes which you will easily comprehend it will be extremely difficult, if at all possible to bring the federalists generally into vigorous action, in favour of Mr. Adams, and yet from the force of the impulse which has been given to the people before the subject could be understood, it is likely, whether the electors be chosen by the people, or the Legislature, that Mr. Adams...
Do you possess enough of the second sight to tell me what our friends have done and intend doing to the Eastward? God forgive me, if I make false calculations about them or deliver myself up too easily to dreams and reveries. I see nothing ex cathedra in that division of Country from which I can augur a determination adverse to the election of the present chief. Johnson says somewhere, in his...
Have our party shewn that they possess the necessary skill and courage to deserve to be continued to govern? What have they done? They did not (with a few exceptions) knowing the disease , the man and his nature, meet it when it first appeared, like wise and resolute patriots: they tampered with it, and thought of palliations down to the last day of the late session of Congress. Nay their...
I placed Mr. Stoddert (who acts as Secretary of war under a temporary commission) this morning about 11 o’clock in the chair I have usually occupied; I then formally laid upon his head eight volumes of the “code militaire” by Briquet with Caesars commentaries in French; kept them upon it ’till he was nearly stupified, when I pronounced him duly installed and as well qualified to discharge the...
I have the honor to transmit copy of a letter, I have left in the Office—addressed to my successor in the Department of War—detailing & explaining certain measures which have been taken in my administration—and recommending certain objects to his peculiar attention. I have the honor to be with perfect consideration, Sir, / Your Obedient Servant MHi : Adams Papers.
The Secretary of War respectfully takes the Liberty to transmit to the President of the United States, a statement of his recollection of the substance and incidents of the Conversation which passed between them the evening preceding the Resignation of his office, committed to Writing immediately afterwards. He also transmits Copies of sundry papers having reference to certain parts of that...
The Secretary of war respectfully takes the liberty to transmit to the President of the U. States, a statement of his recollection of the substance and incidents of the conversation which passed between them the evening preceding the resignation of his office, committed to writing immediately afterwards. He also transmits copies of sundry papers having reference to certain parts of that...
I respectfully take the Liberty to state to you my recollection of the substance and incidents of the conversation which passed between us on the evening (the 5th instt) preceding my Resignation of the Office of Secretary for the Department of War. I dined on the same day with Mr Nicklin, and was at table when informed that my Servant waited at the door to see me. He brought me a Note which...
I enclose to your care a number of letters for General Wilkinson, which you will be pleased to deliver to him, in case he should arrive at your quarters, previously to your leaving the Army. I am Sir with great respect Your obedient servant ( LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
I have received your letter of the 27. instant. On the receipt of your letter of the 18. instant enclosing one from Lieutenant Yelverton Peyton, a letter of which the enclosed is a Copy was written and transmitted agreeably to your request to Major Jonathan Cass of Wilmington— Enclosed is the Copy of Mr. Peytons letter to you of the 15 May I am Sir with great respect Your obed servant ( LS ,...
Inclosed are copies of two letters, which you will be pleased to return. They will convey to you my opinions on some recent propositions. Mr Stoddert who will after the 1st of June, exercise the duties of Secry. of war, asked me to day—if I had directed you & Gen Pinckney to thank the troops or say any clever things to them in the name of the President, on announcing to them the order for...
I have laid your letter dated Head Quarters Plainfield May 23d. instant, before the President. It is thought proper and expedient to suspend raising the Battalion of Artillerists additional to the second regiment of Artillerists and Engineers. You will therefore be pleased to attend to this instruction in the orders you shall issue relative to recruiting for the old establishment. The other...
I have the honor to submit a letter just received from Robert Gilmore Esquire, Chairman of a Committee of Gentlemen charged with the general superintendance of, and disbursing of Monies, for the Fortifications erecting at Baltimore, for the defence of that City and Harbour. The representation made so far as it goes, appears to me strictly correct:—The fact that a Committee consisting of...
Since my last on the subject of the appointment of Lt. Col. Smith to the command of the 2nd. Regiment of Artillerists and Engineers, I have had the honour to receive a communication from you authorizing me to send a Commission for your signature, if I approve, of the measure, to promote Major Tousard to be a Lieutenant Colonel, and another to appoint him Inspector. I have respectfully to...
The pressing solicitations of Major Tousard oblige me to represent to you, that the Season is now arrived for prosecuting with activity the Defences contemplated at Rhode Island, and other places to the Eastward. That without the funds he expects to derive from a settlement of his accounts for former extra Services as an Engineer—it will be impracticable for him to meet the expences,...
The Secretary of War has the Honour to submit for the Consideration of the Heads of Departments, the propriety of the President’s selecting & authorizing a qualified person to visit and examine into the actual State of the Garrisons, Indian Trading Houses or Factories, and public property of every description, with the manner of preserving or disposing of the same for use or Consumption, in...
The Secretary of War respectfully submits the enclosed Draught of a Letter to General William Shepherd, General Warham Parks, and Justine Ely Esquire, and the Documents connected therewith to the President of the United States, for his Determination & Orders. MHi : Adams Papers.
I received your note yesterday afternoon, inclosing a letter to you, from Wm. S Smith Lt. Colonel of the 12th Regiment of Infantry dated the 21st instant. You request my candid opinion upon the project contained in the letter inclosed. Whether his (Col. Smiths) request can be granted in whole or in part, consistent with military and political justice and propriety, without favour or affection....
I received your Note yesterday afternoon, inclosing a letter to you from Wm. S. Smith Lt. Colonel of the 12th. Regiment of Infantry dated the 21st. instant. You may wish my candid opinion upon the project contained in the letter enclosed. Whether his (Col. Smith’s) request can be granted in whole or in part, consistent with military and political justice and properly without favour or...
There is no fact more evident to my mind, than the truth of the position, that it is impossible that our public affairs can proceed under the present chief or his antifederal rival without loss of reputation to all the agents. You are right in observing happy those who are released from the fetter. I feel so notwithstanding the wound my personal feelings received in dissolving the chain. The...
You will no doubt be somewhat surprised to hear that I resigned the office of Secretary of war, the resignation to take effect on the 1st of June, on the 6th instant, and may feel perhaps a momentary regret at my leaving the administration before you had closed your political career. I will mention to you some general circumstances inducing to this event, reserving a more particular detail...
The six additional troops of Cavalry are certainly intended by the Law, transmitted to you, to be disbanded, as well as the twelve additional regiments of Infantry, and would have been mentioned in my letter of instructions, had the Law itself been before me—but the certified copy thereof, was sent, to have a few printed copies struck off. You will please include in the orders, and measures,...