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I have recd. your letter of the 17th. covering the Address & Resolutions adopted in the first Congressional District of the State of Penna. and avail myself of the same channel, for conveying an answer to the former. I tender at the same time, my acknowledgments for your kind expressions, and assurances of my respect & good wishes. To the Republican Citizens of the 1st. Congressional District...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in JM’s hand. Cover missing but contents make clear that the addressee was Randolph. Docketed by Randolph, “J. Madison jr. Aug. 20. 1782.” In the first two paragraphs the italicized words are those encoded by JM in the official cipher; in the third paragraph, the Lovell cipher. On JM’s roster of letters written to Randolph ( JM to Randolph, 13 August...
I have the honor to transmit herewith two copies of the second census (except for the State of Tennessee, which is not yet received) and to notice the following deviations from the law under which it was taken, affecting the uniformity of some of the returns. The return for the counties of Dutchess, Ulster & Orange in the District of New York was not recd. at this office until the 21st. of...
A vessel having been engaged to carry from the Port of New York public dispatches and mercantile letters to Europe; I avail myself of the opportunity of forwarding you a series of Gazettes, which contain the proceedings of Congress, and such current information, as will give you a view of our internal affairs. They will be put, with this letter, into the hands of Mr Nourse, a passenger in the...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by Randolph, “July 16. 1782.” The cover is missing. What may have been a brief complimentary close and signature are too faded to be legible. The italicized words are those written by JM in cipher, except in the one instance mentioned in n. 10. For the passage which he encoded in the Lovell rather than the official cipher, see n. 27. Many years after writing...
It is probably not unknown to you that the Visitors of the University of Virginia, anxious to procure for it Professors, with higher qualifications than might be attainable here, had recourse for a supply in part to Great Britain. They had the good fortune to engage five, all of whom have answered their expectations. One of them, however, Mr. Key professor of Mathematics, though friendly to...
I have been for some time a debtor for your favor of June 21. which was accompanied by the “Apochryphal New Testament.” Accept my thanks for both. I have not yet seen any notice in this Country of Godwin’s last work; nor has it been reviewed by any of the English critics which have fallen under my eye. I think with you however that it can scarcely fail to attract public attention. It merits a...
I sna t ch a moment to intimate that D r T. Ewell is under circumstances which induce him to surround himself with respectable names as far as he can. Yours has been already brought into print, and he is availing himself to the utmost of your alledged patronage of him. I think it probable that he will endeavor to draw from you by letter whatever may be yielded by your politeness or...
I have received your favor of the 8th & handed to Freneau the subscriptions inclosed for him. His paper in the opinion here justifies the expectations of his freinds and Merits the diffusive circulation they have endeavoured to procure it. I regret that I can administer no balm to the wound given by the first report of our western disaster. You will have seen the official account which has...
Your letter of the 14th instant did not arrive till sunday night, and being not then at home, I did not receive it till last night. I now lose not a moment in complying with its request; tho’ I foresee it cannot reach you before you will have left Mount Vernon, and before you will probably have made up a final determination on some if not on all the questions proposed. These are 1. Ought the...
Since your last letter dated 3d. November from Malta, I have received communications from Mr. Mountford of the 3 & 4 Jany. 1st. Feby. and 25 March. You will receive the present by a store ship about to sail from Kennebec with a cargo of plank, timber, spars &c, an invoice of which will be transmitted to you by the Agent who collected it, and which it is hoped will be received upon the annuity,...
My last requested your orders relating to Dohrman’s payment to Me for Mazzei; & I impatiently wait for them. Resolutions have passed for carrying into effect, the Spanish, Indian & Algerine Treaties. The British is now depending. I inclose the proposition in which the opponents of it, will unite. According to present calculation, this proposition will be carryed by nearly the same majority as...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed, “Madison Jas,” by Jefferson. The inclosed paper is a copy of a report from a Committee now lying on the table of Congress for Consideration. The delicacy and importance of the subject makes me wish for your judgment on it before it undergoes the final decision of Congress. The necessity of arming Congress with coercive powers arises from the shameful...
I have received your Letters of the 10, March, 15, April, 30 May, 3 July, 1st. August and 13th. Septr. last. The President has not yet decided upon the appointment of yourself or of any other person to the Consulate of Tunis. In the mean time you are to remain in charge of our affairs with its regency. That you may be provided with the funds necessary for your Support, I have requested Mr....
This Indenture made this tenth day of June in the year our lord one thousand eight hundred and eight, between James Madison of the City of Washington and Dolley P. his Wife, and William Madison of the County of Madison of Frances his Wife of the one part, and Thomas Macon of the County of Orange and Sarah his Wife of the other part. Whereas James Madison now deceased, was seized of a tract of...
Printed text ( Madison, Papers [Gilpin ed.] Henry D. Gilpin, ed., The Papers of James Madison (3 vols.; Washington, 1840). , I, 90–93; and Madison, Letters [Cong. ed.] [William C. Rives and Philip R. Fendall, eds.], Letters and Other Writings of James Madison (published by order of Congress; 4 vols.; Philadelphia, 1865). , I, 43). The third paragraph of the letter, as here printed, is taken...
Your favor of the 3d. was acknowledged in my last. I am now to thank you for that of the 10th. You must ascribe my inaccuracy as to the locks & hinges partly to myself, & partly to my workman. Four of the doors will be thick eno’ for mortise locks which I accordingly prefer, and of the quality which you think best. Three of the doors will be about 1¼ inch thick only. If this thickness be...
I lay before Congress two letters received from Governor Harrison of the Indiana Territory, reporting the particulars and the issue of the expedition under his command, of which notice was taken in my communication of November 5th. While it is deeply lamented that so many valuable lives have been lost in the action which took place on the 7th ulto., Congress will see with satisfaction the...
I can not at so late a day acknowledge your two favors of without an explanation which I am sure your goodness will accept as an apology. Having brought with me to this place a very feeble state of health, and finding the mass of business in the Department, at all times considerable, swelled to an unusual size by sundry temporary causes, it became absolutely necessary to devote the whole of my...
Your favor of the 6th. came to hand on friday. I went yesterday to the person who advertised the Maple Sugar for the purpose of executing your commission on that subject. He tells me that the cargo is not yet arrived from Albany, but is every hour expected; that it will not be sold in parcels of less than 15 or 16 hundred lb. & only at Auction, but that the purchasers will of course deal it...
I have received the copy of your Speech on “American Industry” for which I pray you to accept my thanks. I find in it a full measure of the ability & eloquence so often witnessed on preceding occasions. But whilst doing this justice to the task you have performed, which I do with pleasure as well as sincerity, candor obliges me to add that I can not concur in the extent to which the pending...
On receiving information of the loss of the Philadelphia, the inclosed Act was passed by Congress, whereby a million of dollars was appropriated to enable the President to impart such vigor to the conduct of the war as might at once change the exultation of the enemy in his casual fortune into a more proper sentiment of fear and prepare the way for a speedy and lasting peace with Barbary. The...
Your favor of the 5th. came to hand yesterday. I will attend to your several commissions. Mr. Hawkins tells me, that the seed of the Winter Vetch is not to be got here. Altho’ nearly three months have passed since the signing of the Treaty by Jay, the official account of it has not been received, and the public have no other knowledge of its articles than are to be gleaned from the imperfect...
I have received yours of the 6th. Ult.; also your letters for Monroe, Mazzei and Van Staphorsts ; and shall have a good conveyance for them in two or three days. I am in some doubt however whether it may not be best to detain those for Mazzei and V. untill you can add the information I am now able to furnish you from Dohrman. He has at length closed the business of Mazzei in a just and...
Your letter for Mr. Jefferson arrived a few hours too late for the packet and must wait for some other conveyance. I have some reason to expect one in ten or fifteen days. Congress have received no late intelligence either from him or Mr. Adams. Nor have any interesting measures yet taken place since they have been assembled in force. Those in expectation relate to 1. The Mississpi. On this...
The letter herewith inclosed was put into my hands yesterday by Mr. de Crœvecuœr who belongs to the Consular establishment of France in this Country. I add to it a pamphlet which Mr. Pinkney has submitted to the public, or rather as he professes, to the perusal of his friends; and a printed sheet containing his ideas on a very delicate subject; too delicate in my opinion to have been properly...
Nothing under the title of news has occurred since I wrote last week by express except that the Enemy on the 1st. of March remained in the neighbourhood of Charlestown in the same posture as when the preceding account came away. From the best intelligence from that quarter there seems to be great encouragement to hope that Clinton’s operations will be again frustrated. Our great apprehensions...
In the inclosed Intelligencer you will find the letter from Pichon to the Govr. of Louisiana. Having been written without reference to its publication, it is less carefully fitted than Yrujo’s for the contemplated impression; and in connection with that presents some points for sophistical comments, which are made rather more, than less salient by the reflections of the Editor . The letter...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in JM’s hand. Docketed by Randolph, “J Madison, September 30. 1782.” On the cover, of which only a fragment is extant, is “andolph Esqr. Richmond.” The letter from the Govr. to the Delegation recd. yesterday along with yours of the 20th. inst: expresses some agitation at the supposed effects of the letters to him from Genl Carlton. Whatever curiosity...
The Assembly adjourned the day before yesterday. I have been obliged to remain here since on private business for my Countymen with the auditor’s and other departments. I had allotted towards the close of the Session to undertake a narrative for you of the proceedings, but the hurry on which I did not sufficiently calculate, rendered it impossible, and I now find myself so abridged in time...
Yours of the 12th. with the papers it refers to came duly to hand. Among the letters now forwarded is one from Turreau inclosing a copy of one to him from Mr. Gallatin. He appears to have drawn conclusions from his conference with Mr. G. not warranted by it. Mine with him merely referred him to Mr. G. I think it will be not amiss, as he has acted & incurred expence in the case, to sanction...
I wrote to my father a day or two ago by Col: Burnley to which I refer. The principal step since taken by the H. of Delegates has been the rejection of a bill on which the Assize scheme depended. The majority consisted of 63 agst, 49. Yesterday the vote of the Speaker decided in the affirmative a resolution to repeal the Act which permits Masters to free their slaves. I hope the bill which...
I have the honor to enclose my report on the memorial of Philip Sloan, referred to me by the House of Representatives on the 14th. inst. With perfect respect, I have the honor to be, sir, Your most obed. servt. The Secretary of State to whom was referred on the 14th. instant the memorial of Philip Sloan, praying the reimbursement of a sum of mon[e]y which the Petitioner obtained on loan for...
Printed excerpts (William Cabell Rives, History of the Life and Times of James Madison [3 vols.; Boston, 1859–68], I, 490–91). These excerpts, except for differences in punctuation, capitalization, abbreviations, and one minor instance of phraseology, are identical with the passage on the same topic in the manuscript of JM’s letter to Edmund Randolph on the same date ( q.v. ). If little weight...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed to “The Honble Edmund Pendleton Esqr. Caroline County Virginia.” The two circumstances relating to the proposed duty on trade mentioned in your favor of the 1st. instant were subjects of discussion when the measure was on the anvil. It was evident that the disposition of the States to invest Congress with such a power wd. be influenced by the length of the...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by Randolph, “Madison. Febr 4. 1783.” Except where otherwise noted, the italicized words are those enciphered by JM in the Randolph code. For this code, see JM to Randolph, 7 Jan. 1783 , and hdn. By a letter recd. from Col: Monroe by Mr. Jones I find that my conjectures as to the cause of your silence by the last post were but too true. To the same cause...
Being informed, that report has ascribed to me many opinions relating to the public trust, for which I am a Candidate in this District, and being unable to rectify the mistakes by personal explanations, I have thought it proper to give written communications of my real opinions, to several of my acquaintances in your, and the other Counties. It has been with reluctance in every instance, that...
I have been honoured with your letter of the 31 of March, and find with much pleasure that your views of the reform which ought to be pursued by the Convention, give a sanction to those which I have entertained. Temporising applications will dishonor the Councils which propose them, and may foment the internal malignity of the disease, at the same time that they produce an ostensible...
In pursuance of the plan intimated in my last I came to this City about three weeks ago, from which I continued my trip to New York. I returned last night and in a day or two shall start for Virginia. Col: Monroe had left Philada. a few days before I reached it, on his way to a treaty to be held with the Indians about the end of this month on the Wabash. If a visit to the Eastern States had...
By the Count de Moustier I received your favour of the 8th. of October. I received by his hands also the watch which you have been so good as to provide for me, and for which I beg you to accept my particular thanks. During the short trial I have made she goes with great exactness. Since the arrival of the Count de Moustier, I have received also by the Packet Mr. Calonne’s publication for...
I have rcd. your two letters of the 21. & 22d. They came by the same mail. I return the letters inclosed in them. I missed the sale of my flour at the moment most favorable, in consequence of a trip to Charlottesville which I could not avoid, and which prevented the intended trip of Eddins to Fredg. My crop is still on hand, with the exception of a few barrels, which were disposed of before I...
I have recd. & return my thanks for the printed communications accompanying your note of the 4th. instant. To appreciate your proposed expedient for a standard of measures and weights would require more time than I can apply, & more mathematical science than I retain. Justice will doubtless be done to it by competent Judges. I have given a hasty perusal to the observations “addressed to the...
I have received your letter of the 16th. inst: which was followed by the printed Sheets to which it referred. Of these I can not say less than that they exhibit the same extent of statistic research, the same condensation of ideas, and the same tone of disinterested patriotism, which have been remarked in other publications from the same pen. The subject which they discuss has been so ably...
RC (Virginia State Library). The inclosed extract of a letter from General Washington No. 1 will give your Excellency a more particular account of the late embarkation from N. York than has been before obtained. On thursday last Congress were informed by General Potter & Col. Johnston who came expresses for the purpose that a general mutiny of the Pennsylvania line stationed near Morris Town...
Your favor of the 9th. of Jany. inclosing one of Sepr. last did not get to hand till a few days ago. The idea which the latter evolves is a great one, and suggests many interesting reflections to legislators; particularly when contracting and providing for public debts. Whether it can be received in the extent your reasonings give it, is a question which I ought to turn more in my thoughts...
This late acknowledgment of your letter of Sepr. 20. is the effect of its reaching me at Richmond, where every moment of my time was in some way or other, exacted by my public situation, and of the accumulated arrears of a private nature requiring my attention since I have found myself at home. The Convention which called forth your interesting remarks & generous solicitudes, was pregnant with...
Your communications by Lt. Lewis were safely delivered on the evening of the 8th. inst. As it had been calculated that the inte r val between the return of Mr Rose and the departure of L t. Lewis would give sufficient time to the British Governmen t to decide on the course required by the posture in whic h the affair of the Chesapeake was left, its silence to yo u on that subject, could not...
Your favor of the 3d. was handed me by Docr. Robertson, whose return to N. York gives me this opportunity of thanking you for his acquaintance. It has been a mortification that I could not avail myself more of it. The Budget from Mr. Pinkney has not yet been laid before Congress. If there were any thing agreeable in the internal affairs of G. B. or in those which concern this Country, it would...
I have now the pleasure of confirming the expectations hinted in my last concerning the result of the measures which have been favoured with your patronage. The Bill for opening the Potowmac has passed precisely on the model transmitted from Maryland, the last conditional clause in the latter being rendered absolute by a clause in the former which engages this State for fifty shares in the...
I have let Col. Monroe know that you was furnished with a draught on a House in Philada. for 250 drs. & finding that it would be convenient to him, have authorised him to draw on you for that sum. I have also given him a draught on Genl. Moylan, of which the inclosed is a letter of advice. I reserve the note of Bailey towards covering the advance made by you, unless it should be otherwise...