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Your favor of the 21. with the letters returned under the same cover was recd. last night. As you had not then recd. the last letters from Mr. G. & myself on the modified proposal to disuse B. Seamen, I shall wait the arrival of your next before I conclude on the instructions which are to go by the Wash. I find by the accts. from Bermuda, that the mere difficulty which suspends the Treaty is...
Your favor of the 21st. was recd. by the last mail. The passport for Niemcewicz went by the first succeeding opportunity. Mr. Perry arrived two days ago with the enclosed letter from Genl. Turreau. The request it makes is not very consistent with the understanding which regulated the former compliances; but necessity is pleaded, with assurances that this shall be the last, and that the bills...
I recd by the last Mail your note fixing the time for your return. The Wash has put herself into a situation denoting a departure, but it is probable that a further delay is convenient for her compleat preparation. The dispatches will have made ready for her some time since, but the lights thrown on the Treaty by the gentlemen consulted, and the flaws which have successively disclosed...
a free use of their harbors & waters, the means of refitting, & refreshment, of succour to their sick & suffering have at all times and on equal principles, been extended to all; and this too while the officers of one of the belligerents recd. among us were in a continued course of insubordination to the laws, of violence to the persons of our Citizens and of trespasses on their property....
The Secretary of State, has the honor to state to the President, on the subject of the communication made to him by the Governor of Massachusetts, on the 10th. Ultimo, that negociations were in due time instituted for adjusting with Great Britain the limits between her territories on this Continent and those of the United States, that no serious difficulty has arisen in providing for an...
WASHINGTON CITY. • FRIDAY, JULY 31 . • By the PRESIDENT of the UNITED STATES of AMERICA, A PROCLAMATION. Whereas great and weighty matters claiming the consideration of the Congress of the United States form an extraordinary occasion for convening them, I do by these presents appoint Monday the twenty-sixth day of October next, for their meeting at the city of Washington; hereby requiring the...
I reached home last evening a little before sunset. About 1/2 after eleven the post arrived under a misconception of the arrangement; and I dispatched him a little before 2 OC. I was obliged to decide on your letter to the Govr. therefore without consulting the law or the Proclamation, and of course with but little reflection. It appeared however in all respects proper, as to the permanent...
The gentleman who brings the inclosed letters recommending him for a public Agency at Martinique, had thought of proceeding to Monticello. He declines it in consequence of his conversation with me on the subject. I have apprized him, that it was not thought proper to give a formal commission in such a case without some formal or positive sanction from the French Govt. He readily enters into...
The Post not arriving yesterday morning till between 7 & 8 OC. it was impossible for me to comply with your request as to the letters to Govr. C. and Genl. D. even so far as to peruse and consider them without risking a breach in the chain of rides. The letters therefore await the downward mail of this morning. The only remark I have to make on that to Govr. C. is that in commenting on the...
The post having arrived last night after Eleven OC & the one from below being expected early this morning, I have had but little room for bestowing thought on Dayton’s letter and your drafted answer. It would be an advantage to know the precise answer given by Mr. Rodney to the application which was made to him on the same subject. I heard this read by Mr. R. but can not sufficiently rely on...
The mail has just brought me Daytons letter which is inclosed, with a letter from Foronda, & a Commission for Robinson. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I received last night your letter of the 18th. with a return of the Letters sent with it. Capt. Saunders who is alluded to in Mr. Erskine’s communications, being in the land service, and the alledged enlistment of British deserters, being into the same service. I shall address the information to Genl. Dearborn, and shall intimate to Mr E, that foreign deserters will not be permitted to enlist...
Havg. written to the Office for a statement of our affairs with Algiers, I have recd. the inclosed letter & documents from Mr. Brent. Will it not be prudent at the present crises as well on the Coast of Barbary as elsewhere, to soothe the Dey with a part of the Articles agreeable to him say 20. or 30 dollrs. worth; or shall we wait for further information from Lear? The tranquility on the...
I recd. last night or rather this morning yours of yesterday, and return the remarks of Gen. S. inclosed in it. They strengthen the opinion as to the extent of his information on certain important subjects, and the vigor of his understanding. The late scraps of intelligence from England put together make it probable that something towards an arrangement had taken place early in July, and...
With the other papers herewith inclosed is an answer to Mr. Erskine’s letter of the 1st. instant. I have thought it proper not to forward it without previously submitting it to your perusal and corrections. Sepr. 19 The mail for the 1st. time has arrived this morning. The rider now here, who carried up the first says he did not call because he did not know that I was at home as he went, and...
The Post who neglected to call on me, as noticed in my letter of yesterday, met with one at the Gum spring who brought his mail back to me. I should have sent him on to Monticello with the letters &c. now inclosed, but that he signified he was to go down for the ensuing mail to Fredg. To prevent a break in the whole chain, and avoid delay to your packets for Washington & Richmond, I allowed...
Yours without date was recd. last night by the man who went up & came down without a Valize. I presume he explained the cause of this which explained the failure of the mail due from Fredg. Whether the B. Decree is to be renounced to Congs. must depend on intermediate accts. from London. If nothing changes the picture of things with Spain, very serious questions must arise with respect to that...
I have forwarded your notes to the several Post masters. The inclosed letter from Pleasanton which mentions the terms on which the Missionary to Batavia is engaged. I understand the $3000 to be in full of all expences &c. I directed payment out of the Foreign intercourse fund. The case of the Indefatigable & crew may be laid before Congs., either for their decision on the individual cases or...
Permit me, without an unnecessary Preface, to present myself to you as a Candidate for the office of Collector in the Port of Norfolk; provided, you have not already designated the Person who is to fill it. I fear the Application will surprize you; it is true, I make it with Reluctance on several Grounds; nor would I have made it, had I not a Son, in his 23 Year, regularly educated in one of...
By the President of the United States of America, A Proclamation. Whereas information has been received that a number of individuals who have deserted from the Army of the United States, and sought shelter without the jurisdiction thereof, have become sensible of their offence, and are desirous of returning to their duty, a full pardon is hereby proclaimed to each and all of such individuals...
There appears only, in a journalized acct. of the transactions by Rbt Lear a passage under date of June 3—intimating that he sd. be disposed to give time rather than suffer the business to be broken off—& our countrymen left in slavery—with a succeeding intimation that he had consented to the condition, of allowing time for the delivery of the family of the Ex Bashaw. This consent however not...
The Secretary of State in compliance with the Note of the President, relating to the public property at New Orleans as reported by Governor Claiborne to the Secretary of the Treasury; begs leave to state that no part of that property appears to fall in any respect under the perview of the Department of State, unless it be the Government House, and the lot on which it stands. This it is...
I think the grounds of a message comunicating Pinkney’s & Armstrong’s letters, should be those of aiding Congs. in appreciating our foreign relations, and in judging of the influence these ought to have on their measures of precaution. The Private letter of P. would perhaps have some good effects; but besides the objection to taking such a liberty with it, the communication might be ascribed...
Agreeably to the resolution of the Senate of the 30th November last, the Secretary of State has the honor to submit to the President for the information of the Senate, the statements herewith inclosed from No. 1 to 13 inclusive. No. 1. A statement of impressments from American vessels into the British service, since the last report made from this Department on the 5th. March, 1806, founded...
It appears that Skipwith did not communicate the Milan Decree; nor is it otherwise authenticated to us than in the Madrid Gazette & the reference in the Spanish decree. It cannot be said, that all ports are forbidden to neutrals except their own. The British decrees permit a trade with Enemy colonies, not forbidden by the Mother Countries. The ports of neutrals are also open to each other, as...
incapable of giving a valid consent to their alienation in others belong to persons who may refer altogether to alienate, or demand a compensation far beyond the liberal justice allowable in such cases. From these causes the defence of our sea board, so necessary to be pressed during the present season, will in various ports be defeated, unless a remedy can be applied. With a view to this I...
A Report to the President. The Secretary of State has the honor to Report to the President in conformity to the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 30th. of March, that the only information which has been received respecting the letter from which the extract inserted in Genl. Armstrong’s letter to the Secretary of State, of January 22d. 1808, was taken in the extract itself to...
By the President of the United States, A Proclamation whereas information has been recieved that sundry persons are combined or combining & confederating together on lake Champlain & the country thereto adjacent for the purposes of forming insurrections against the authority of the laws of the US. for opposing the same & obstructing their execution, and that such combinations are too powerful...
By the President of the United States. A Proclamation. Whereas information has been received that sundry persons are combined or combining and confederating together on lake Champlain and the Country thereto adjacent for the purposes of forming insurrections against the authority of the laws of the United States, for opposing the same and obstructing their execution, and that such combinations...
Shortly after you set out from Washington, I was called on by Mr. E. Livingston, and requested to be the channel of a representation to the Executive on the subject of the Batture. Without adverting to the nature of the question involved, which connects it rather with the Dept. of Treasury than of State. I did not refuse the request; and recd. from him afterwards the letter and documents...
I got home on friday night, by taking my carriage to pieces & making three trips with it over Porter’s mill pond in something like a boat, and swimming my horses. I found the roads over the flat lands much better than I had hoped. Having been once dry and smoothed, the rains did not penetrate and left them very passable even where slightly covered with water. I was glad to learn that you had...
Finding on my return from a little ride, that the post was here without my having recd a key to the mail, I thought it best to have a link of the chain taken off, rather than take the alternative. Hence the mail goes open; but I am enabled to send the letters addressed to me for your perusal. There are letters from Erving but old & not worth forwarding, In fact I take all of them to be...
I have just recd. by the Bearer the inclosed letter. As I understand that the writer Mr. V. and Mr. Dunbar, are both of them acquainted with the established course in such cases, I fulfill their expectations as well as keep within the rule of propriety, in merely saying that I believe both to be men of respectable characters; and consequently not excluded from the ordinary indulgence grantable...
Yours of yesterday was duly delivered by the Rider. I have informed him, that I do not wish him to make any additional trips on my account. It is my purpose to set out for Washington a day or two after you do. I shall be able to fix the day by the time you call on us. which I hope you will find it not inconvenient to do on your way. If you should return in the course you came, it will be an...
The Bearer Mr. Dade has just handed me the inclosed which he wishes to support with your; the object it explains. In addition to the testimonies of Mr Taylor &c &c I have a letter from my brother which speaks the same language, as justified by his personal knowledge. I was but slightly acquainted myself, with Mr Dade, but his character as I have always viewed it thro’ his standing in the...
I have just recd. yours of the 29. and inclose the papers noted “to be returned.” I think the best, and probably not the most expensive conveyance of Mr. J: will be in a small public vessel, whether she go directly to his destination, or deliver him in France, and, unless, previous to his departure, collateral reasons should urge an early communication to France or England, it appears to be...
The letter from me respecting the Leonidas was with the papers returned. I considered it as a mistake: But the letter was of so little acct. that I have not preserved it. Can you tell me any thing of the Randolph who has written one of the inclosed letters? We have had fine rains since my arrival, and as this neighborhood had not previously suffered from drouth, our fields are very promising....
I return the letters of Randolph, and Riddle. The complaint in that of the latter has been the subject of al from others as he intimates. I was not aware that any of them except McKinley were as respectable as he describes them. But answers to such letters are always to be avoided, farther than they may be given by the result itself. McKinley was answered verbally thro’ his friend Mr. Jackson,...
I received last evening yours of the 9th. with the papers to which it refers and now return as desired Sullivan’s and Ishomel’s letters with your proposed answer to the former. The questions arising on them are not without difficulty, and this is not a little increased by the spirit which seems to haunt the Governor. His letter furnishes agst. his own statements the inference which is...
Yours of the 12th. with the papers it refers to came duly to hand. Among the letters now forwarded is one from Turreau inclosing a copy of one to him from Mr. Gallatin. He appears to have drawn conclusions from his conference with Mr. G. not warranted by it. Mine with him merely referred him to Mr. G. I think it will be not amiss, as he has acted & incurred expence in the case, to sanction...
Yours of the 16 with the papers sent with it, were recd. last evening. Mr. Short did not seize exactly my ideas as to the concealment of his mission. If this could be made effectual, and freed from the appearance of being studied, by a direct voyage to St. P., I think it would be best. But if he is to pass thro’ France, a frank but general disclosure of his destination wd. be preferable to an...
Yours of yesterday reached me this morning, and I acknowledge it now, for the Mail of tomorrow. I return your draft of an answer to the Memorials from Philada. with a few small alterations pencilled. One of them is intended to avoid the implication that no rapine had reached us on the Continent, where certainly we have suffered much, altho’ not in a way to justify belligerent charges agst. our...
Unwilling to detain the Rider, I send the letters recd. by him witht. remark. It is possible we may be able to set out for Monticello on Wednesday next. This will however depend on circumstances. Yrs &c &c DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
The packet brought me by the mail of friday from Milton, was strangely delayed somewhere; more than by the mistake which carried it to Monticello. It contained the inclosed letter from Pinkney, which has a much better flavour that his preceding one of the 22d. June. Should any future packets or letters from the Office of State, get to Monticello in the first instance, I beg you to open them....
Your favors of the 5th. & 6th. were duly recd. last evening. I return Mr. S.s letter; with the Addresses from Boston &c. and the proposed answer. The few changes which I have suggested, if proper will speak for themselves. It is a nice task to speak of war, so as to impress our own people with a dislike to it, and not impress foreign Govts. with the idea that they may take advantage of the...
Yours of yesterday was duly recd. by the rider. I return Shorts & A’s letters. Your observations on the latter place the subject of it in its true point of view. Perhaps the mail of today may bring me a letter of the same date, that may have lost the last mail by passing thro’ the office of State. If the letter to you be the sole communication it is another example from that quarter, of...
Inclosed herewith are Letters from Armstrong & Ervine recd. by the Mail of Wednesday, and which could not of course be sooner forwarded. I add also sundry others of minor importance. Armstrong’s letters leave me wholly at a loss as to the time & place of the St. Michael’s return. From the permission of her return to France from Falmouth I fear that is to be her course; and what almost confirms...
If you gave attention to Turreaus letter of Aug. 31 you will have seen in its stile & some of its remarks an arrogance which ought not to pass wholly unnoticed. That I may commit no error in the answer, I inclose the draft of one under an unsealed cover to Mr. Graham. You will either forward it directly to him, with your own corrections, or return it to me to be corrected according to your...
I return the letter of Mr. G. with that of Soderstrom & the opinions of the Lawyers. From a hasty perusal of them, I think the construction of Mr. Gallatin is clearly established. The exception in the Proviso to the Embargo law, ought to be taken strictly according to a general rule, unless the obvious policy of the law admit a latitude. Here the policy, notwithstanding the views taken of it...
Yours by Mr. Chisolm was duly handed to me. I shall look for you & Mr. Barlow on Wednesday, & for the pleasure of your company at dinner. Among the papers herewith enclosed are a letter from Mr. Hackley of late date, and a Spanish documt. confirming the victory over Dupont. The letter from Graham mentions the disaster at the Capitol, of which it is probable you will have had a more particular...