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I inclose a draft on Mr. Allen of Fredericksburg, for $150. which I hope will be in time to extinguish the debt to the Bank, before a renewal of the note and a further call on the friendship of Mr. Nourse, become necessary. Do not fail to make him fully sensible of my thankfulness, for the aid of his name so obligingly furnished throughout the period which made it acceptable. I am recovering...
If I have not sooner thanked you for the considerate present in the Box of fruit referred to in your letter of , the apology will I am sure have occurr’d to you. A delay which the Box met with on the way lessened the value of a part of its contents, but not the obligat<ion> felt for the kindness wch prompted <...> the favour. I am regaining, tho’ not rapidly, my health, & strength. I hope the...
Your obliging letter of Decr—came duly to hand. Having heard nothing since either from you or from Mr. Barbour, I infer that our field of choice for the vacant Chair in our University will be limited to our own Country: In this event, your favorable estimate of Mr. Harrison’s qualifications will doubtless be a weight in his scale, when compared with the pretensions of others. Of the standing...
I have recd. your two letters of June 8 & 9. As my draft on Mr. Allen lately sent you will have furnished the means of extinguishing my debt to the Bank, I suppress the discounting note inclosed in one of them. It has not been my wish to precipitate the sale of the House & lots in Washington, & hope it may not be necessary. But the hold my Creditors have on my landed property here, exposing me...
My friend Mr. Rives is about to take his station in Paris, as diplomatic Representative of the U. States; and not doubting that an acquaintance will be mutually agreeable, I wish to open a direct way to it by this introduction. You will find him equally enlightened & amiable; with liberal views on all subjects; and with dispositions to cherish the friendly feelings & improve the beneficial...
Your letter of Jany. 28 came duly to hand. The answer to it has been procrastinated to this late day by circumstances which you will gather from it. I am glad to learn that the regenerating spirit continues to work well in your public councils, as well as in the popular mind; and elsewhere as well as in France. It is equally strange & shameful, that England with her boasted freedom, instead of...
Finding to my great regret that another Court had passed without a single step as far as I know being taken in the case of our mothers will whilst the debt of an impatient Creditor is swelling with Interest, and the property which is to pay the debts & Legacies probably sinking in price, I snatched the opportunity of an interview with Mr. Chapman to test his pulse on the subject. He manifested...
I inclose the promised letters to the Baron & Baroness de Neuville to which is added one to Genl. Lafayette. In this last, I have interwoven what will make you properly known to him and Mrs M. has subjoined what will equally introduce Mrs. Rives. We offer to you both our affectionate respects, & a repetition of all our good wishes Draft (DLC) .
J. M. presents his respects to his friend E. Cresson, and fulfils his promise, by inclosing an autograph of General Washington & Mr. Jefferson. It would have been done sooner, but for a tedious indisposition, from which J. M is now not entirely recovered. FC (DLC) .
I recd. in due time your letter of May 10th inclosing a continuation of your observations on the "Natural boundaries of Empires". The views you have taken of the subject, give it certainly an attractive interest. But I must retain the impression, that they may reasonably be qualified by the progress of human Art in controuling the operation of physical causes. I should have sooner acknowledged...
I have been long a subscriber to your "Register", and retain my respect for its merits, and sincere wishes for its prolonged success; but finding it expedient at the age I have reached, to abridge the attention required for such objects, I must request you to discontinue my name on your Subscription list. According to the account presented lately by your Collector, the balance due from me in...
I have recd. your letter of yesterday, on the subject of your application for an office becoming vacant at Washington. I need not assure you Sir that I have always entertained a very sincere esteem for your character, with the best wishes for your welfare, nor remark that I well know of the repeated proofs you have recd. of the public favor & confidence. But I could not comply with the request...
Your letter of May 26, having passed on to a Southern post office did not reach me on its return, till yesterday. Its motive & language, entitled it to a kind, however unsatisfactory answer The question you state is too important not to forbid a naked decision, and if no other obstacle existed, the infirm state of my health would not admit a comprehensive & argumentative one. Whether the...
I recd Sir by the last mail, your letter of the 9th. inst: I can not but wish well to the object of the prospectus communicated, and feel all the respect due to the names which subscribe to it. But I am restrained from conforming to the example by a rule prescribed by the age I have reached, & other considerations, which not only forbids new subscriptions, but is withdrawing the greater part...
J. M. presents his respects to Mr Grimke with acknowledgments for the Copy just recd. of his able & persuasive Address at the Dedication of a Building for Religious uses. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. yours of the 23d. I canot but say that the sales of the Tobo. have disappointed my hopes, tho’ I have no doubt, your attentions did it justice; and that there must have been a defective management here. It is true, the want of rain at the ripening stage, may account in some degree for the prevailing quality: But it is equally true that my neighbors with the same weather, and a...
I have this moment recd. yours of the 25th., and having a casual oppy. to the P. O. this evening shall get an answr. into the mail tomorrow morning. The 10th. of July is as you suppose the day for the Meeting of the Visitors, and I shall look for you here in due time. It ought to be on the 8th. at the latest. I am glad to find you so successful in overcoming the successive attacks on your...
I have just recd yours of June 29[h]; and am much obligd by your considerate provision of quarters for me & Mrs. M. during the approaching Sessions of the Bd. of Visitors. Should my health suddenly improve so far as to enable me to attend, I shall avail myself of the arrangement you have made. But such is at present my feeble state, with some remains of indisposition, that I count on the...
I can not at so late a day acknowledge the receipt of your favor of Mar. 1. without feeling that I owe an explanation of the delay. The truth is that it was at first occasioned by the idea that I should soon be able to combine with my thanks for the agreeable little volume accompanying your letter, those due for the important one from your own pen, and this cause of the delay was followed by...
I recd. by yesterday’s mail yours of the 2d. with the communication for Mr. T. J. Randolph wch. will be forwarded by the earliest mail, viz on Monday. I do not find among my Pamphlets that of Docr. Cooper on Government. I am under the impression that it is still in the hands of Mr. Lomax. In that case he will readily let you have it. Should it have been returned, let me know, and I will look...
It is with much concern that I find myself agn. detained by the infirm State of my health from the duty of being in my place at a Meeting of the Visitors. I had not been without hopes, that the obstacle wd. have been removed, but the remains of a bilious indisposition, with the feebleness produced by it, do not permit my wishes on the occasion. I can only therefore assure my Collegues, that no...
Yours of the 3d. was duly recd. and the Articles it refers to [du]ly delivered. My overseer says that he can not immediately follow up the waggoning his Tobo. & wishes the 2 Hhds. on hand to be sold without waiting for more, being apprehensive that the order in which the Tobo. was priced, may render delay unfavorable to the sale, by limiting it to the manufacturers. The Harvest is now over in...
Learning from Mr Rives that he expects to be in New York some days before his embarkation for France, I take the liberty of giving him a line for you. I need not refer to his high public standing, derived from the able part he has borne in public affairs, that being of course known to you; but as a friend & neighbour I wish to bear my testimony to his great personal worth; and the rather, as...
I recd. by the last mail yours of the 8th. but not in time for an answer by its return. I hope however a letter to Mr. Gallatin which I inclose with pleasure will not be too late for the object of it I thank you, Sir, for your attention to the case of Cooley; and am very glad that you will be able to put Genl. Lafayette at ease agst. the threatened litigation. Your postscript relating to Dr....
This Indenture made this Henshaw day of July one thousand eight hundred and A Madison nine, between James Madison and Dolley P. his wi[fe] the county of Orange, of the one part, and William Smith, of the same county, of the other part— Witnesseth, that the said James Madison and Dolly P. his wife for and in consideration of the sum of eight hundred dollars to the said James by the said William...
Inclosed is a copy of the original draft of the present Constitution of Virginia; from a printed Copy, now perhaps a solitary relic. It may fill a few pages of the Museum, when not otherwise [ ] appropriated. Who the Author of the draft was, does not appear. Col Geo. Mason is known to have been the most conspicuous member in discussing the subjects, and conducting it thro’ the Convention. Do...
I learn from Dr. Dunglison, that you left the University, before a letter I wrote a few days ago could have reached you. It inclosed a copy of the original draft of the present Constitution of Virga. which I supposed might not improperly find a place in the Museum. Subjected to the copy was a short note relating to the authorship of the draft. It occurs on reflection yt. it may be as well not...
Waggons with six Hhds. of Tobo. set out this morning and will be in Richd. soon after this reaches you. The overseer says that with one exception, they may expect better prices than the 2 last Hhds. I would ask your attention particularly to No. 13. which was made by Mr. P. my brother in law, and is spoken of by his judicious neighbor Mr. Newman, as of the very first quality; and of the same...
Your letter of the 5th found me under a return of indisposition which has not yet left me. To this cause you must ascribe the tardiness of my attention to it. Your speech with the accompanying notes and documents will make a very interesting and opportune publication. I think with Mr. Johnson that your view of the Virginia doctrine in 98-99 is essentially correct, and easily guarded against...
Mr & Mrs. M. have duly recd. Govr. Giles polite & kind invitation to make a part of his family during the approaching Convention. Other arrangemts. having been previously made for their accommodation on that occasion, they do not avail themselves of his proffered hospitality; but are not the less sensible of the many thanks which they owe for it & which they pray him to accept with returns of...