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I have recd. your letter of the 29th ulto. The task in which you are engaged is a very interesting one, and I should feel much pleasure in aiding your researches for the necessary materials. But my recollections are very barren. I know of no "debates" during the period of Lloyds, but his, which are very defective, and abound in errors; some of them very gross where the speeches were not...
Your letter of July —— was not recd. till last evening. The Baltimore post mark is of Aug. 5. There is another post mark of Aug. 18. at a place not legible; and a manuscript endorsement “missent.” These are the only circumstances explaining the delay. I sincerely regret the difficulties you experience on continuing “The Weekly Register.[”] During the period of my public occupations, I was not...
I have received, fellow Citizens, your Address bearing date the 22d. of April. The circumstances of the period which led to this expression of your sentiments, were well calculated to produce anxiety in the minds of Citizens cherishing an ardent love of peace, tho’ ready to maintain the rights of their Country, even at the expence of that blessing, of any culpable share in bringing on so...
1 April 1805, Washington . “Your favor of Feby. 15. was duly recd, and the letter for Mr. Monroe which it covered soon after forwarded. It escaped my attention, till it was awakened at this moment by an accidental glance at the last paragraph that you wished to know these facts. I recd. a few days ago a letter from Col. Monroe of Jany. 19. He was then at Madrid, and had just had a formal...
I return the letter from you to D. on the subject of Mr. G. He seems to be incorrigible. If I am not misinformed, his eyes are opening to the conduct & character of Mr. S, with respect to both of which he has suffered himself to be misled partly by his own passions, partly by those who took advantage of them. You see the new shapes our foreign relations are taking. The occurrence between...
The National Gazette of Jany. 2 contained a publication, edited since in a pamphlet form; from two   sons of the late Mr. Bayard; its object being to vindicate the memory of their father agst. certain passages in the writings of Mr. Jefferson. The filial anxiety which prompted the publication, was natural & highly commendable. But it is to be regretted, that in performing that duty, they have...
8 February 1804, Department of State. “In answer to your letter of the 13th. ult. I have to inform you, that instructions have been transmitted to Paris calculated to promote a modification, if possible, of the Convention of the 30th. of April last, so as to divide the sum payable under it, more equally among the claims, than may happen from its operation in its present form.” RC (owned by...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). At the bottom of the first page of this two-page letter, JM wrote “E. Randolph Esqr.” The cover is missing. Words and parts of words encoded by JM in the official cipher have been italicized. Late in his life JM or someone at his bidding placed a bracket at the beginning of the second paragraph and another bracket at the close of the sixth paragraph to designate the...
Quer. if a fixed temperature might not be got by referring to a thermometer—the freezing point—being the natural standard Quer. as to the inaccuracy of English calculations of London Pendulum. Quer. if mode of distributing actual standards thro’ the States sd. not be suggested at the close of the report. Quer. would not uniform cylinders be as eas[i]ly measured & judged of, as squares. Quer....
1776 . Lists costs for clothing, for equestrian provisions, for money “paid to Dr Wiggins,” for expenses for travel to Princeton, and “for Harry’s expences in Philada. & Journey home” totaling £66 10s. 4½d. and a credit of “149 Continl. Dollars,” or £44 14s., leaving a balance due of £21 16s. 4d. Ms ( Vi : Orange County Judgments, Madison v. Shepherd , November 1797). 1 p. Headed “Mr. William...
According to a promise in my last, I inclose a copy of the rates at which McGeehee works. I inclose also a few observations on a subject which we have frequently talked of, which are submitted to your entire disposal, in whole or in part, under the sole reserve of the name of the author. In Gordon’s History Vol. IV p. 399–400, is a transaction that may perhaps be properly referred to in the...
Your favor of the 3d. instant came duly to hand. You will have learnt from the Secy. of War, the measures, which were thought, on the whole, best suited to the general posture of our military affairs. The events on the Niagara frontier were as unexpected as they have been distressing. As there can be little comparative inducement to the Enemy, to prolong their barbarities in that neighborhood,...
I have received your favor of with the pleasure I could not but feel in learning that the accident to your shoulder was so far advanced towards a cure. It is with a very different feeling I am given to understand that any doubt exists as to your coming to Washington this winter, where besides considerations of a public nature, the social ones would be so interesting to us. I shall not give up...
A dysenteric attack at Georgetown with its effects retarded my journey so much that I did not arrive here till a few days ago. I am free at present from the original complaint, but a little out of order with the piles generated by that or the medicine it required. The Cato in which were the busts of P. Jones and the box of books for myself never arrived till the day before yesterday, having...
Having just learnt that the present Mail will arrive at New York in time for the British packet, I avail myself of the opportunity of forwarding your Commission and letters of credence, as successor to Mr Monroe, in the Legation at London. Since my last which went by Mr Nourse in a dispatch vessel bound first to L’Orient and then to Falmouth, I have received your communications of the 23 Novr...
I cannot acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 23. without a return of many thanks in which Mrs. M. unites, for the kind sentiments it expresses towards us; and without adding that no apology was required for the hasty departure of yourself and the estimable friend with you. The stay of both, had circumstances permitted, would certainly have given us great pleasure, the greater as I well...
I have received your letter of the 8th. inst. Whether the case of your Sloop Hiram is embraced by the Convention with France may be considered as doubtful. It would therefore be advisable for you to take the advice of Counsel upon that point, and upon the steps necessary for you to pursue in order to bring it within the purview of the Treaty, if any further proceedings are incumbent upon you;...
1. P 34. no right to visit for municipal objects See Resoln. of H. of Comms & H of L in 1739. Approvd. by the King. Resd. that ye subjects of G B. have an evident right to navigate in the Amn. Seas, as well in going to as in returning from any part of the dominions of H. Majesty, & that it is a manifest violation of this right to visit such vessels at open sea, under pretext that they are...
I recd. in due time your favor inclosing your two late Speeches, and requesting my views of the subject they discuss. The Speeches could not be read without leaving a strong impression of the ability & eloquence which have justly called forth the eulogies of the public. But there are doctrines espoused (in them) from which I am constrained to dissent. I allude particularly to the doctrine...
The enclosed letter for you has been left in the office of the Secretary of State, & I address it to Columbia, where I presume it will find you. I recd. during my absence in Virginia the letter in which you joined Mr. F. Maur[y] of N. York, on the subject of the french negroes on board the frigates from Gaudeloupe [ sic ]. The information was communicated to the President, and produced thro’...
I have received your letter of the 1st. inst. respecting the capture of the Ship Eugenia, off the Harbour of New york by the Cambrian British Frigate. That you may be correctly acquainted with what passed on the complaint made by the British Minister of the rescue of the former Vessel in the last year, from the British captor, who had her in possession, I enclose a copy of my answer dated 5th....
I recd. duly yours intimating your intended visit to the Sulphur Springs. I hope you will derive from it all the benefit wished. The mail from the N. this morning brings nothing more than you will find in the enclosed N. paper. The paper from N. York did not come to hand. The final act of the drama at Paris is not yet announced. It would seem that the allies can if they please, force Louis...
Finding on my return from a little ride, that the post was here without my having recd a key to the mail, I thought it best to have a link of the chain taken off, rather than take the alternative. Hence the mail goes open; but I am enabled to send the letters addressed to me for your perusal. There are letters from Erving but old & not worth forwarding. In fact I take all of them to be...
On the Receipt of your Letter of the 6th. Instant referring to Information that there were on board the Frigate Chesapeake two British Deserters, one from the Triumph, under the Name of George Curtis, the other from the Bellona, under that of John Birk, an Inquiry was ordered into the Facts. From the Report of Captain Decatur, commanding the Chesapeake it appears that the Crew of that Ship...
Will you be so good as to have the files of the War Dept. searched for the letters referred to in the inclosed, and to forward them if found ⟨to⟩ the ⟨writer.⟩ Friendly respects RC ( DNA : RG 107, LRRS , M–317:10). Docketed by a War Department clerk in September 1817, with the note: “James Madison Esq. requesting that the papers mentioned in the enclosed letter be forwarded to the person.” At...
I submit to your perusal the inclosed letter as the most ready mode of explaining the wish of Bishop Madison with respect to Mr. Mansfield. If you can furnish me with any information proper for an answer, you will oblige me by so doing. It is not improbable that the Bishop may take Monticello in his way as he proceeds Westward. In this case you will be saved the trouble otherwise imposed. Yrs...
25 October 1803, Department of State . In answer to his letter of 20 Oct., informs Lewis that his “losses in the case of the Schooner Maria having happened since the 30th. Sept. 1800, they are not covered by the Treaties with France respecting the acquisition of Louisiana.” The papers Lewis submitted to the State Department respecting his claim will be forwarded to Livingston at Paris “with a...
My known respect for the public & personal worth of Dr. Richard Field has led to a wish from his friends that I would make it known at a moment when his name will be before you as a candidate for a Collectorship. I must apologize for any intrusion in such a case; but in speaking of Docr Field I can not say less than that from every thing I have known or believe of his character, he is well...
I observe that the price of flour has risen a little. As the advance of the season will soon bring the Northern supplies into market, I think it would be best to take advantage of it, and if you concur in this opinion I will ask the favor of you to dispose of mine. Draft (DLC) .
Your letter of the 27th august has just come to hand that inclosing the papers from Mrs Jones having been previously recd. It appears by Mr Pinkneys communication that W Brown, being compleatly in his power had given up between 30 and 40 thousand Dollars and there was some prospect of getting from him a further sum, which however was not likely to be very considerable. I sincerely wish not...