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Being satisfied from observation and experience, as well as from Medical testimony that ardent spirit, as a drink, is not only needless, but hurtful; and that the entire disuse of it would tend to promote the health, the virtue, and the happiness of the community, We hereby express our conviction, that should the citizens of the United States, and especially all young men, discontinue entirely...
Whereas his Imperial Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, as the common friend of the United States and Great Britain, has offered them his mediation, with a view to the restoration of Peace and the establishment of permanent harmony between them; and the invitation having been accepted on the part of the United States in contemplation of a like acceptance on the part of Great Britain: Now...
Queries Sent to Jacquelin Ambler RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Randolph was the recipient of this copy, now folio 94 in Vol. IV. For the notes on its docket and on that of JM’s draft copy, now folio 76 in Vol. II of the same collection, see ed. n. Answers by Jacquelin Ambler to Queries MS ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by JM, “Answr. to certain queries relative to affairs of Virga. inclosed in...
I have received information that measures, imposing serious restrictions on our navigation and commerce, are taking in the North of Europe, with a view to guard against the disorder called the yellow fever. It is represented that these restrictions are likely to be generally extended in that quarter thro’ the means of a concert, promoted by one of the most influential powers and it is probable...
5 January 1796. JM has sold to Theodorus Bailey and John B. Van Wyck his land known as lot number two of the Sedachqueda Patent in the Mohawk Valley of New York, amounting to approximately nine hundred acres, at $5.83⅓ per acre, for a total of $5,250. Bailey and Van Wyck have paid JM $4,000 and have given him a note for $1,250 payable on or before 1 Jan. 1797. The parties agree to have the...
16 December 1801, Washington. Transmits the secretary of the treasury’s 14 Dec. report and the proceedings of the treasury officers, in which are described the measures authorized by the board and completed since the commissioners’ report of 28 Nov. 1800. RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 46, Reports from the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, 7A-F7). RC 1 p.; signed by JM and the other...
Printed text ( Pennsylvania Packet , 11 June 1782; also Virginia Gazette Virginia Gazette, or, the American Advertiser (Richmond, James Hayes, 1781–86). , 22 June 1782). David C. Claypoole, editor of the Packet , introduced the letter to his readers with this foreword, probably supplied by JM: “The following Extract of a Letter written from Philadelphia, by a Gentleman in Office to one of the...
Resolved that the Executive be requested to take measures for procuring a Statue of General Washington to be of the finest marble and best Workmanship with the following inscription on its pedestal Viz: The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia have caused this Statue to be erected as a monument of affection and Gratitude to George Washington who uniting to the endowments of the...
Substance of a Conversation held by Js. Madison Jr with Col: Beckwith, at the desire of Mr. Jefferson— Last evening offered the first opportunity of breaking to Col B—— the subject for which he has been thought a proper channel to the Governour of Canada. It was explicitly made known to him, that besides its being generally understood that the N. W. Indians were supplied with the means of war...
MS ( NA : PCC , No. 36, I, 347). Docketed, “Mr. Blands and Mr Scots Motion July 12. 1782.” In Bland’s hand, except for the passage written by JM and designated in n. 2, below. The background and outcome of Colonel John Laurens’ mission as a special minister of the United States to France have already been summarized ( Papers of Madison William T. Hutchinson, William M. E. Rachal, et al .,...
We received this morning a letter subscribed by Peter Thornton informing us that he is the son of a gentleman in Virginia, that he lately made his escape from N. York and is now detained by your Excellency till some testimony shall be given by the Delegates from Virga in his favor. Although we are total strangers to the youth, and are very imperfectly informed of his case yet as we have us...
The Commissioners for the University of Virginia having met, as by law required at the tavern in Rockfish gap on the blue ridge, on the 1st. day of August of this present year 1818, and having formed a board, proceeded on that day to the discharge of the duties assigned to them by the act of the legislature intituled an “act appropriating part of the revenue of the literary fund and for other...
At a regular meeting of the Visitors of the Central College on 11th. May 1818, at which Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John H. Cocke, & Joseph C. Cabell, were present, it was agreed, that it being uncertain whether Thomas Cooper would accept the Professorship of Chemistry, in the event of his not doing so, it would be expedient to procure a Professor of Mathematicks. It was also agreed to...
At a meeting of the Visitors of the Central college held at Charlottesville on the 5th. day of May 1817. on a call by three members, to wit, John Hartwell Cocke, Joseph C. Cabell & Th Jefferson, present James Monroe, James Madison, John H. Cocke, and Th: Jefferson. The records of the trustees of the Albemarle academy, in lieu of which the Central college is established, were recieved from...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. 8. Oct: 1817. Certain letters from Doctor Thos. Cooper to Th: Jefferson, dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors, and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16. they are of opinion that it will be for the interest of the College to modify the terms of agreement which might be...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. held at Charlottesville 7. Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College, known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
At a called meeting of the Visitors of the Central College, held at the House of Mr. Madison in Orange, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Hartwell Cocke, and Joseph C. Cabell, being present: The plan of the first Pavilion to be erected, and the proceedings thereupon, having been stated and agreed to— It is agreed that application be made to Doctor Knox of Baltimore to accept the...
We The subscribers, Visitors of the Central College, having been specially called to meet on the 26th. day of Feb. 1819, and authorised by the act of the legislature, now in session, for establishing the University of Virginia, to continue the exercise of our former functions, and to fulfill the duties of our successors, Visitors of the sd. University, until their first actual meeting, have...
M r Bowdoin’s letter of May 1. 1807 with Ch. M. Somers’ affidavit as to the negociation for 3. millions of a s of land in the Floridas between Omeely ,
The Commissioners for the University of Virginia having met, as by law required at the tavern in Rockfish gap on the blue ridge , on the 1 st day of August of this present year 1818 , and having formed a board, proceeded on that day to the discharge of the duties assigned to them by the act of the legislature intituled an “act appropriating part of the revenue of the literary fund and for...
(Copy) At a meeting of the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund on the 28th. day of April 1806. Present— James Madison, Secretary of State Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury John Breckenridge, Attorney General The Secretary of the Treasury laid before the Board a Report dated the 26th. of April 1806 which was read, and is as follows— “That the current payments to be made by the...
Abstract. 15 October 1792. John Taliaferro Brooke, having purchased lot 127 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, from James Monroe and Eliza his wife, conveys that lot to Robert Mercer for £435. Witnessed by JM, John Minor, Jr., and Joseph Jones. Recorded 8 Nov. 1792. Printed extract (Crozier, Virginia County Records: Spotsylvania County , p. 456).
At a called meeting of the Visitors of the Central College , held at the House of M r Madison in Orange , Thomas Jefferson , James Madison , John Hartwell Cocke , and Joseph C. Cabell , being present: The plan of the first Pavilion to be erected, and the proceedings thereupon, having been stated and agreed to It is agreed that application be made to Doctor Knox
The late Governor of the Commonwealth having thought proper to confide to us the office of Visitors of the Central College near Charlottesville , under an act of the legislature , establishing as it’s patron, the Governor for the time being, we deem it our duty to report to you our proceedings under that appointment, with the progress & prospects of that institution. The want of a seminary of...
At a meeting of the Visitors & c held at Charlottesville 7 Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College , known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Know ye, that we the President and Masters of the College of William and Mary in Virginia, by Virtue of a royal Grant from their late Majesties King William and Queen Mary, of the Office of Surveyor General of the Colony of Virginia to the said College, have constituted and appointed, and by these Presents do constitute and appoint Thomas...
16 September 1793, Orange County, Virginia. Indenture by which JM purchases from Elizabeth Chew for £3 about thirty acres of land in Orange County, part of the Black Level tract. Letterbook copy ( Vi : Orange County Courthouse Records). 2 pp. Witnessed by James Taylor, James Taylor, Jr., and Roger Bell. Recorded at Orange County Court on 23 Sept. 1793 by James Taylor, clerk of the court.
The Secretary of the Treasury reported to the Board, that provision has already been made to meet nearly all the demands which will become due in Holland, during the course of the present year, but, that it is necessary to make immediate provision for the payments on account of principal & Interest which fall due there, during the first five months of the year 1803, and amounting to Four...
4 February 1804, Washington. The measures authorized by the board subsequent to the report of 5 Feb. 1803 , “so far as the same have been completed,” are detailed in Gallatin’s 3 Feb. 1804 report to the board and in the statements referred to therein, “which are herewith transmitted.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 46, Reports and Communications Submitted to the Senate, 8A-F5); RC and enclosures...
5 February 1803, Washington. Measures authorized by the board subsequent to the report of 16 Dec. 1801, “as far as the same have been completed,” are detailed in Gallatin’s enclosed 3 Feb. report to the board and in the proceedings of the treasury officers referred to therein. RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 46, Reports from the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, 7A-F7). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s...
MS ( NA : PCC , No. 19, IV, 347–49). Docketed: “Report of Mr Cornell Mr Montgomery Mr Madison On a letter of 18 from superintendant of finance[.] Read Debated 26. The two last paragraphs recommitted[.] Passed Feby 27th 1782.” JM wrote all of the report except two passages mentioned below in notes 4 and 5. The Committee to whom was referred a letter from the Superindt. of Finance of the 18th....
Printed text ( JCC Worthington Chauncey Ford et al ., eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (34 vols.; Washington, 1904–37). , XXII, 244). On motion of Mr. [James] Madison, seconded by Mr. [Ezekiel] Cornell, Resolved, unanimously , That a committee be appointed to confer with the Superintendant of finance and Secretary at War, on the practicability and means of procuring...
This Indenture made this twelfth day of October in the year eighteen hundred and twenty five, between James Madison of the county of Orange of the one part and Charles Scott and Francis K. Cowherd of the sd. county of the other part, witnesseth that the said James Madison for and in consideration of one dollar to him in hand paid before the ensealing of these presents the receipt whereof is...
The House went into a Committee of the Whole to consider the report of the Committee of Claims on Gilbert Dench ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States … (42 vols.; Washington, 1834–56). , 4th Cong., 2d sess., 1835–36). Messrs. Madison … were of opinion, that if Mr. Dench had any claim it was upon the state of Massachusetts, and not upon the United...
§ Indenture for Land at Fort Warburton. 31 August 1815. “This Indenture … between Thomas Attwood Digges [and] William Dudley Digges both of Prince George’s County in the State of Maryland and Robert Brent of the City of Washington in the District of Columbia of the first part and James Madison President of the United States of America of the second part” conveys “unto the said James Madison...
Printed text (John Sanderson, ed., Biography of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence [2d ed.; 5 vols.; Philadelphia, 1828], I, 388–89). Nothing is said there of its source except that it had “fallen into our hands.” References to the existence of the letter are made in Brant, Madison Irving Brant, James Madison (6 vols.; Indianapolis and New York, 1941–61). , I, 90; Burnett, Letters...
Present: James Madison, Secretary of State. Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury. Cæsar A. Rodney, Attorney General. The Secretary of the Treasury laid before the Board a report, dated the 21st of March, 1807, which was read, and is as follows: "That the payments to be made during the year 1807, on account of the public debt, are estimated as followeth, viz: Annual interest and...
Represent to Genl. Wilkerson That the great probability of an amicable & early settlement of our differences with Spain at Paris had rendered the Executive extremely desirous of avoiding actual hostilities, because it would be a mere destruction of human life without affecting in the smallest degree the settlement, or it’s conditions, that therefore they had determined to assume the Sabine as...
M r Gray , son of M r William Gray so distinguished for his wealth & his patriotism, wishing with his lady to pay their respects at Monticello , I can not do less than favor the opportunity by a line of introduction. I am unacquainted with him, otherwise than by his introduction thro’ a friend here; but doubt not that he will be found worthy of your civilities which will be acceptable to his...
Mr. M & Mr Grayson present their complts to Mr. King and beg leave to inform him that the doors of the Assembly were shut on a letter from Col Carrington & Col. Lee, which Mr. Grayson saw but did not sign for reasons irrelative to the present subject. Mr. M. was in the Legislature at the time and knows the cause was very different from the one mentioned to Mr. King. Both of them are satisfied...
Among the confederacies of antiquity, the most considerable was that of the Grecian republics associated under the Amphyctionic council. From the best accounts transmitted of this celebrated institution, it bore a very instructive analogy to the present confederation of the American states. The members retained the character of independent and sovereign states, and had equal votes in the...
To the People of the State of New-York. THE remaining charge against the House of Representatives which I am to examine, is grounded on a supposition that the number of members will not be augmented from time to time, as the progress of population may demand. It has been admitted that this objection, if well supported, would have great weight. The following observations will shew that like...
To the People of the State of New-York. A FIFTH desideratum illustrating the utility of a senate, is the want of a due sense of national character. Without a select and stable member of the government, the esteem of foreign powers will not only be forfeited by an unenlightened and variable policy, proceeding from the causes already mentioned; but the national councils will not possess that...
To the People of the State of New-York. THE number of which the House of Representatives is to consist, forms another, and a very interesting point of view under which this branch of the federal legislature may be contemplated. Scarce any article indeed in the whole constitution seems to be rendered more worthy of attention, by the weight of character and the apparent force of argument, with...
MS ( NA : PCC , No. 19, III, 303). In JM’s hand, except for a clause written by Alexander Hamilton (n. 2, below). Docketed by Charles Thomson: “Report of Mr Osgood Mr Madison Mr Hamilton Passed Decr. 3. 1782.” Below this in Samuel Osgood’s hand appears: “of letter from J: P. Jones for leave to serve with Mr. Vaudriel.” The date docketed by Thomson should have been “Decr. 4.” His committee...
The examples of antient confederacies, cited in my last paper, have not exhausted the source of experimental instruction on this subject. There are existing institutions, founded on a similar principle, which merit particular consideration. The first which presents itself is the Germanic body. In the early ages of Christianity Germany was occupied by seven distinct nations, who had no common...
To the People of the State of New-York. HAVING examined the constitution of the house of representatives, and answered such of the objections against it as seemed to merit notice, I enter next on the examination of the senate. The heads into which this member of the government may be considered, are—I. the qualifications of senators—II. the appointment of them by the state legislatures—III....
The United Netherlands are a confederacy of republics, or rather of aristocracies, of a very remarkable texture; yet confirming all the lessons derived from those which we have already reviewed. The union is composed of seven co-equal and sovereign states, and each state or province is a composition of equal and independent cities. In all important cases not only the provinces, but the cities...
To the People of the State of New-York. THE second charge against the House of Representatives is, that it will be too small to possess a due knowledge of the interests of its constituents. As this objection evidently proceeds from a comparison of the proposed number of representatives, with the great extent of the United States, the number of their inhabitants, and the diversity of their...
To the People of the State of New-York. FROM the more general enquiries pursued in the four last papers, I pass on to a more particular examination of the several parts of the government. I shall begin with the House of Representatives. The first view to be taken of this part of the government, relates to the qualifications of the electors and the elected. Those of the former are to be the...