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Sovereignty It has hitherto been understood, that the supreme power, that is, the sovereignty of the people of the States, was in its nature divisible; and was in fact divided, according to the Constitution of the U. States, between the States in their United, and the States in their individual capacities that as the States in their highest sov. char. were compent to a surrender of yr whole...
A sketch never finished nor applied. As the weakness and wants of man naturally lead to an association of individuals, under a Common Authority, whereby each may have the protection of the whole against danger from without, and enjoy in safety within, the advantages of social intercourse, and an exchange of the necessaries & comforts of life; in like manner feeble communities, independent of...
Altho’ the Legislature of Virginia at a late Session declared almost unanimously, that South Carolina was not supported in her doctrine of nullification by the Resolutions of 1798 it appears that those Resolutions are still appealed to as expressly or constructively favoring the doctrine. That the doctrine of nullification may be clearly understood, it must be taken as laid down in the Report...
I thank you, tho’ at a late day, for the pamphlet comprizing your address at New-York. The address is distinguished by some very interesting views of an important subject. The Absolutists on the "Let alone Theory" overlook the two essential prerequisites to a perfect freedom of external Commerce, 1. that it be universal among nations. 2. that peace be perpetual among them. A perfect freedom of...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Woodbury thanks him for his interesting Report from the Treasury Department. The exuberant prosperity of our Country is a happy illustration of the beneficent operation of its political Institutions; and with the anticipated rate of its growth in population, in productive capacities, and in resources for protection, not only on its borders, but on the Ocean,...
I have received your letter of Decr. 22d. covering a communication from Mr. Hodges. Had you found it convenient to deliver it in person, it would have afforded me an agreeable opportunity of welcoming you to my abode. I very sincerely express my sensibility to the friendly views you have taken of my public Career—and I pray you to be assured of my cordial respects and good wishes. FC (DLC) .
I have this day drawn on you in favor of Walter S. Chandler for two hundred dollars which you will please to meet by a sale of as much flour as may be requisite. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. your letter of the 15th. with the Tobacco seed it refers to. I tender the thanks due respectively to Mr Vaughan and yourself for the obliging attention to which I am indebted; and will take measures for turning the seed to the best account. I was favored many years ago by Col. G. Mason with a sample of the like seed, and had hills enough planted from it to test its character in...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Van Buren thanks him for the copy of the President’s message on the 7th. instant. It is a very able Document, and in some of its aspects particularly, interesting. The mode in which it disclaims any threats to France seems well adapted to the occasion. Its effect on the sensibilities of the French Executive, should these be involved in the sequel, may...
I have your letter & am glad to find, that the information you request, will have probably reached you thro’ the Newspaper which contain it as notified from the authoritative source. I have only therefore to express my hopes, that your exertions on the occasion have the success they merit, & tender the respects I pray you to accept Draft (DLC) . Written on the same page with a draft of JM to...
J. Madison with his best respects to Mr. Minor thanks him for his Address on "Education &c". before "The Institute of Education of Hampden Sidney College". He has read it with the pleasure which could not fail to be imparted, by the instructive and impressive views it takes of a subject vitally important to our popular Institutions. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. yours of the 27th. Ulti. Should the whole of my little stock of Coke Devon do well you can be furnished here in the spring with a pair. Should the Bull Calf fail, you can be accomodated at least, by temporary management that will give you the initiating service of a grown Bull. It is desirable, if convenient; that you should replace your lost female from another source; that being...
I received a few days ago under a blank cover a copy of Mr. Binney’s Eulogy on Chief Justice Marshall: a slip of paper being inserted; with the printed words "from the select and Common Councils of the City of Philadelphia". As the communication has the appearance of being somewhat circular, it may be a question whether an acknowledgment of the favour be, or be not due or expected. I wish not...
Your letter of Novr. 17. having been directed to Petersburg which is very distant from me, was not recd. till yesterday. I am sorry that I cannot give to it the answer that would be most agreeable. Unwilling as I am to obtrude my private affairs on others, the occasion requires me to say that for a number of years past the drafts of various denominations on my resources, have so far exceeded...
J. Madison tenders his thanks to Mr Everett for his interesting and eloquent address at Bloody Brook. It has been read with much pleasure; and with a full perception of its parentage in all the lineaments of the Offspring. RC ( MHi : Everett Collection); FC (DLC) .
Your letter on the subject of Mr. Pemberton has not passed into oblivion; but I am sensible that the lapse of time since it was received exposes it to that appearance. For my silence, I must plead my growing dislike to the pen, and the condition of my fingers, which imposes on me often, as in the present case, the unwelcome task of dictating to borrowed one’s. Though I am aware of your junior...
I have recd. your letter by Henry. You mistake much in supposing my health to be such as when you last saw me; my debility & the effect of Rheumatism on my limbs scarcely permitting me to walk across the room; and the condition of my fingers obliging me often as in the present case to dictate to another pen, rather than force a use of my own. The appearance of the fly in the Wheat, and the...
It has happened that one of my Devon young Cows has produced a female Calf, and that the Calf of the other, tho’ a male, was dropt in so feeble and infirm a State as to remain helpless for some time. He is however gaining the use of its limbs and is otherwise improving; but with some uncertainty as to its matured character, it has also to encounter the season of Winter so unfavorable to very...
J. Madison with his best respects to Mr. Everett tenders his thanks for the copy of his address delivered at Amherst College. He may say of it, and he says much in doing so, that it is worthy not only of the occasion but of the Author. RC , FC (DLC) .
I received in due time your valuable Discourse before the "Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company" for which I tender my thanks. Accept them also for the Copy of your little publication on some of the Oriental languages. That intended for the "University of Virginia" was duly forwarded—I am sensible of my tardiness in acknowledging your favors: but I have an apology in the feebleness of age,...
I have recd. your letter of Octr. 24. and enclose an Autograph of Mr. Monroe. Of Mr. Jay, none remain on my files. Mine is furnished by this answer to your letter. At my great age, & with my rheumatic fingers, it is very different from my ordinary writing at an earlier period, as you will perceive by the accompanying specimen I readily bestow commendation on your Antiquarian pursuit; but a...
Your letter of the 12th. being addressed to Madison instead of Orange Court House was not received till the 24th. Much as I wish success to the monumental plan, I know not that I could in any mode, or any terms manifest my approbation of it more strongly than I have already done in my published letter accepting the appointment conferred on me. With friendly respects FC (DLC) .
This will be handed to you by Richard Chapman a son of Reynolds Chapman who married one of my neices. He will communicate the hope of his father and his own, that he may obtain a birth in the Military school at West-point. My esteem and regard for the Father, and good wishes for the son, will apologize for my saying that his success could not but be agreeable to me, if the way for it be...
Your letter of the 7th. has just come to hand. I enclose a copy of my letter to Mr. Everett, that to Mr. Ingersoll I cannot find. It was published in several news-papers of the day, not improbably in some one at Richmond perhaps your files can refer Mr. Smith to it. I know of no pamphlet containing the two letters. I am obliged to say that my health is not such as has suggested to you, I hope...
private I have received your letter of Sepr. 30th. with a copy of "An Appeal from the new to the Old Whigs." The Pamphlet contains very able and interesting views of its subject. The claims for the Senate of a share in the removal from Office; and for the legislature an authority to regulate its tenure, have had powerful advocates. I must still think however, that the text of the constitution...
I have duly received Sir your letter of Augt. 5th. with the accompanying Medal. The use made of the expressed opinions in which I joined, on the subject of Ardent Spirits marks the zeal with which the good cause of temperance is espoused. Should Ardent Spirits be every where banished from the list of drinks, it will be an event not the least remarkable or happy in this eventful and reforming...
I have duly received your favor of the 7th with the letter and Medal from Mr. Goddard, which you were good enough to forward under your cover. The use made of our expressed opinion on the temperance subject, denotes the peculiar zeal, with which its patrons are inspired. Should ardent spirits be every where banished, from the list of drinks, it will be a revolution not the least remarkable in...
Your favour of july the fourth, with the copy of "Horse Shoe Robinson" did not find their way to me until yesterday. This will explain the delay of my thanks which I tender you. Should the scanty limits to which my reading is reduced by my crippled health and faded vision prevent or retard the pleasure which these volumes promise, Mrs Madison will have an early enjoyment of this fruit of your...
I have received your letter of the 5th. instant in which you request my advice on the choice of a profession. Observing your decided bias in favor of the Law, and not dissenting from it, I need only express the pleasure with which find you so determined to aim at success, by distinguished qualifications for it—You will be apprized by better counsellors than I am, that you will have so much to...
Your letter of July was duly recd. The recollections it so kindly expresses are very gratifying coming from one whose friendship I have always valued, & to whom I have been often indebted for attentions useful to me. I join in all your good wishes, for more tranquility & harmony in our public affairs: which will always be best promoted by a course avoiding the extremes to which party...
Your letter of the 4. instant having gone by mistake to Montpellier in Vermont, has but lately come to hand. In my 85th. year, and under continued inroads on my health, I can not fail to be excused from undertaking a compliance with its request; for which indeed I could not otherwise be at all qualified, without a fuller knowlege of all the considerations which ought to influence the choice of...
I have received your letter of the 20th. informing me "that I have been unanimously elected President of the Washington National Monument Society, in the place of its late lamented President Cheif justice Marshall." I am very sensible of the distinction conferred by the relations in which the Society has placed me; and feeling, like my illustrious predecessor, a deep interest in the object of...
Your valued letter of Novr. 4th. was recd. in due time and would have been promptly acknowledged, but for the daily expectation of being able to thank you at the same time, for the article so kindly provided for my crippled feet during the rigor of Winter. It happened, that a mistake which forwarded the article to Richmond instead of Fredericksburg delayed its arrival, ’till it became...
I have received Sir, your letter of the 13th. and regret that I cannot find among my papers the letter of Chief Justice Marshall to which you refer. Such a letter was certainly presented to me, and left an impression very favorable to your talent in taking likenesses. As your portrait of Mr. Marshall doubtless exists and his opinion of it can thro’ his family be obtained as well as their own...
My increasing infirmities and fading vision have retarded my thanks for the copy of your valuable Geological Report, to which I have been obliged to give a perusal less careful than I am persuaded it merits, and I must add without a scientific capacity to do full justice to it. The survey must have been a very fatiguing task which I hope has not impaired your health, and that the result will...
I have just received the enclosed letter from Mr. Hassler, and I think myself justified in saying that I believe him to be a very honest man and possessing in a high degree the knowledge required in the professorship of natural philosophy. His competitors being unknown to me I cannot speak of their respective qualifications compared with his. Should the choice of the Visitors fall on him my...
I have just recd. your letter of the 29th. June, and immediately commicated your object to the Rector of the University with an expression of your scientific qualifications for the professorship lately vacated. With friendly respects & good wishes FC (DLC) .
I have received your letter of the 3. Instant. My handwriting is now so varied by the effect of rheumatism on my fingers that it may be best to comply with your request by its ordinary character when in health, of which the enclosed is a specimen. I well recollect your father as a cotemporary in public service, and the personal respectability which he combined with that of his representative...
I have just drawn a check on the Bank for $60. Having only fifty to my credit there I must request the favor of you to deposit the additional ten to with friendly respects please enquire for a box forwarded for Mrs. M. by the Steamboat & send it on— FC (DLC) .
I have duly recd. your favour, postmarked the 9th. inst. containing your suggestion on the subject of my manuscript papers. I am fully aware that these, as far as worthy of the public eye, could pass to it, under no editorial auspices with greater advantages than under yours; and I have a just sensibility to the friendly dispositions, as far as these could be properly indulged, with which the...
My wagon will set off in the morning with two more hogsheads tobacco, which I hope will find a favorable market. The delay in sending it has proceeded from the continued moisture of the weather which prevented its preparatory order. The next load will not be sent until the commencement of our harvest. I subjoin a memorandum of articles which you will please send by the return of the wagon. You...
The box containing the bound newspapers has come safe to hand; one of the volumes in an improved state. I hope my request did not hurry their return before you had done with them. Should it have so happened they are not beyond your reach. I find that I have more reason for apology than you had, for the delay in returning Sullivan’s libel on Mr. Jefferson which you left with me. It was put into...
I have received your letter of the 25th. and feel a pleasure in gratifying the wish of Chancellor Kent by enclosing the paper transmitted to me by your father. With great esteem & cordial salutations RC and enclosure (NHi) ; draft (DLC) . Enclosure is a copy of a letter from James Kent to Robert Troup, 20 June 1788.
Your discourse before the Historical Society has afforded me much pleasure, & I may add instruction. It is worthy both of the subject and of the author. With cordial esteem. Will you be so good as to return the bound Gazette of Freneau as soon as convenient. FC (DLC) .
I have requested Col. Peyton to remit to you $300. This will enable you to extinguish my debt to the Bank & avoid the necessity of a renewed discount—The undrawn balance of $66 I wish to remain to my credit in Bank. Draft (PHi) .
J. M. with his respects to Mr. Duer, encloses copies of the two letters from his father requested in his letter of the 13th. Instant. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. your two letters of the 12th & 16th. the former with bill of articles sent by Aleck which came safely to hand. Your clerk in summing the articles made the amount $283.15 instead of $183.15 an inadvertency readily corrected. It would be unreasonable not to be satisfied with the sales of the two last hogsheads of tobacco & I hope we may prove as fortunate in the two my wagon will...
I have recd. Sir, your letter of the 13th. I was acquainted with your father when a resident in Philadelphia, but I have no recollection, if I ever had any knowledge of military services rendered by him to the U. S. during the Revolutionary War. There is an error in supposing that we were in battle together, having not been myself in any of its battles. With friendly respects— FC (DLC) .
Having lately received the box forwarded by you to Major Gibbon I no longer delay my thanks for your attention to it and for the friendly sentiments expressed in your letter of January 26th. I pray you to accept in return my best respects & good wishes. RC ( ViW : Conway Whittle Family Papers); FC (DLC) .
I have just received the enclosed letter returned to me from Richd. to which I had directed it, taking for granted it would either find Mr. Butler there, where his letter to me was dated, or follow him, according to an arrangement for the purpose. I am very sorry for the occurrence as my supposed silence might be misconstrued. I enclose also a copy of the letter, that you may know its...