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Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James"
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Sovereignty It has hitherto been understood, that the supreme power, that is, the sovereignty of the people of the States, was in its nature divisible; and was in fact divided, according to the Constitution of the U. States, between the States in their United, and the States in their individual capacities that as the States in their highest sov. char. were compent to a surrender of yr whole...
A sketch never finished nor applied. As the weakness and wants of man naturally lead to an association of individuals, under a Common Authority, whereby each may have the protection of the whole against danger from without, and enjoy in safety within, the advantages of social intercourse, and an exchange of the necessaries & comforts of life; in like manner feeble communities, independent of...
Altho’ the Legislature of Virginia at a late Session declared almost unanimously, that South Carolina was not supported in her doctrine of nullification by the Resolutions of 1798 it appears that those Resolutions are still appealed to as expressly or constructively favoring the doctrine. That the doctrine of nullification may be clearly understood, it must be taken as laid down in the Report...
I thank you, tho’ at a late day, for the pamphlet comprizing your address at New-York. The address is distinguished by some very interesting views of an important subject. The Absolutists on the "Let alone Theory" overlook the two essential prerequisites to a perfect freedom of external Commerce, 1. that it be universal among nations. 2. that peace be perpetual among them. A perfect freedom of...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Woodbury thanks him for his interesting Report from the Treasury Department. The exuberant prosperity of our Country is a happy illustration of the beneficent operation of its political Institutions; and with the anticipated rate of its growth in population, in productive capacities, and in resources for protection, not only on its borders, but on the Ocean,...
I have received your letter of Decr. 22d. covering a communication from Mr. Hodges. Had you found it convenient to deliver it in person, it would have afforded me an agreeable opportunity of welcoming you to my abode. I very sincerely express my sensibility to the friendly views you have taken of my public Career—and I pray you to be assured of my cordial respects and good wishes. FC (DLC) .
I have this day drawn on you in favor of Walter S. Chandler for two hundred dollars which you will please to meet by a sale of as much flour as may be requisite. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. your letter of the 15th. with the Tobacco seed it refers to. I tender the thanks due respectively to Mr Vaughan and yourself for the obliging attention to which I am indebted; and will take measures for turning the seed to the best account. I was favored many years ago by Col. G. Mason with a sample of the like seed, and had hills enough planted from it to test its character in...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Van Buren thanks him for the copy of the President’s message on the 7th. instant. It is a very able Document, and in some of its aspects particularly, interesting. The mode in which it disclaims any threats to France seems well adapted to the occasion. Its effect on the sensibilities of the French Executive, should these be involved in the sequel, may...
I have your letter & am glad to find, that the information you request, will have probably reached you thro’ the Newspaper which contain it as notified from the authoritative source. I have only therefore to express my hopes, that your exertions on the occasion have the success they merit, & tender the respects I pray you to accept Draft (DLC) . Written on the same page with a draft of JM to...