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I recd. by the last mail, yours of Sepr. 15. and have written as you desired to the Secy. of War, on the subject of your son George. I wish that room may be found for him at West point, and that the result may fulfil all the parental wishes, he will carry with him. It must afford pleasure to all your friends, that the spot you have chosen for your future home has so many fertile charms in it:...
Since mine of Sepr. 20. answering yours of Aug. 30. I have recd. that of Sepr. 28. with a copy of the Report of the Come. on Roads & canals. I have not been able to read more of it than the part which you notice. The Come. have transcended all preceding Advocates of the doctrine they espouse in appealing to the old articles of Confederation for its support. Whatever might have been the...
Since I asked the favor of you to sketch a report from the Visitors of the University such as would embrace the topics and statements which the Board appeared to have in view, it occurred that the occasion required, and the members of the Board would approve, some tribute to the memory of Mr. J. With this view I prepared an introductory paragraph, as you will see; and that the Report might be,...
In obedience to the law requiring that the Rector & Visitors of the University of Virginia, should make report annually to the President and Directors of the Literary Fund, (to be laid before the Legislature at their next succeeding meeting) embracing a full account of the disbursements, the funds on hand, and a general Statement of the Condition of the said University The said Rector &...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Garrett, and returns the check for $3000. with his signature as requested. RC ( ViU ).
I have just received Sir, your letter of Octr. 28. inclosing a copy of your Bill in Chancery and very sincerely sympathise in the distresses which led to it; the more so, as to other motives, it adds the personal sentiments it expressd towards me. I cannot but regret at the same time, that it has been thought advisable to make me, in any manner a party, in the pursuit of your claim <on> Mr...
I received some days ago your letter of Aug. 28. If I did not invite an earlier one by my example, it was because I often heard of you, and was unwilling to add a feather to the oppressive weight of correspondence which I well know to be your unavoidable lot. You will never doubt that your happiness is very dear to me; and I feel the sentiment growing stronger as the loss of others dear to us...
I am just favored with yours of Ocr. 28. As the intimation to Mr Hilliard will go with more weight from the Executive Committee than from one of its members, I drop a few lines for him to be signed by you also, and duly forwarded. I send it in this form the rather, because of the distinction between the 2 cases of the Periodicals and of the general supply of books; and between both as now...
I have recd. from Mr. Van Zandt a copy of his Bill in Chancery: of course known to you, and have answered the communication by a letter a copy of which I have thought it proper to inclose you. This error of fact which it corrects make me hope that I shall be rescued by the explanation from the disagreeable situation in which the Bill places me. With friendly wishes RC ( MHi ); FC (DLC) .
Your favor of the 28th. having met with delay at our post office, I recd. it too late to look into the papers of accts. &c you were so good as to inclose. I can not but think it will be well that a Statement of what relates to the particular work done since the last Report, and yet to be done, should be made out by the Proctor in a simple form; to be referred to in the report, rather than to...
I have recd. your letter of Ocr. 25. requesting from me any information which would assist you in preparing a Memoir of Mr Jefferson, for the Columbian Institute. Few things would give me more pleasure than to contribute to such a task; and the pleasure would certainly be increased by that of proving my respect for your wishes. I am afraid however, I can do little more than refer you to other...
I send them immediately to the p.o. that they may go in the mail of tomorrow morning. Friendly respects & good wishes RC (Marshall B. Coyne, Washington, D. C.).
I have just recd. yours of the 1st. inst: 1826. In the absence of J. P. Todd, who has not it appears, made provision for the debt referred to I should not hesitate to remit you the amount, the principal at least, from my own funds, but I am obliged to say, that such has been the failure for a series of years, of the only sources on which they depend, & such the expences I have found...
private I recd. some days ago yours of—of October. Approving every plan of instruction that can improve the character of the coming generation, I am sensible of the particular value of that which is the subject of your letter and of the merit of those who labour to advance it. But without enquiring in what degree, this branch of education falls within the rule applicable to other branches...
I have rcd. Sir, your pamphlet on the question of Retroceeding George Town to the State of Maryland, with a request of* my ideas on the subject The question involves several points which would require more development than is permitted by other claims on the remnant of time now before me; nor am I sure that it would be discreet to intrude my opinion, on a local subject which it is understood...
I have recd. Sir under cover of the 6th. your Discourse obligingly sent me, on the "Landing of William Penn". The occasion interesting in itself is made the more so, by the judicious & impressive views with which you have surrounded it. Such a tribute was well due to that renowned Lawgiver, and to the State which has made so good a use of his bold and benevolent innovations. The Principles &...
I have just recd. Sir your letter of the 11th inst The proceedings   of the Convention of 1787, as taken down by me, are in an extent to make, of themselves, a considerable work. Propositions   prior to yours had been made on the subject of them. But I have never determined either on the time or mode of committing them to the press: and it is quite possible, that the publication may be a...
I have recd your letter of Ocr. 16. inclosing a copy of one to the adjt Genl. of the U.S. I have read them both with every wish for such recollections as would enable me to speak particularly to the points stated: but without being surprized at the inadequacy of them. At my advanced age, after a lapse of so many years, with so many cotemporary attentions to official duties and with private...
I have recd. your letter of the 16th. referring to the prospectus of "the American Quarterly Review." I learn with pleasure that our literary resources have suggested a periodical work, which, under the conducting hand, obtained for it, must extend whilst it employs them. Few things would coincide more with my inclination, than to be a productive correspondent. But at my now advanced Stage of...
Your favor of Ocr. 11. came duly to hand, and at a later day, a memoir, referred to in it. You speak of two Memoirs: If more than a No. 1. was sent, there has been a miscarriage. I am sorry that the claims on my decreasing remnant of time do not permit me to enlarge on the profound subjects embraced in the Memoir. I must not omit saying however, that they are profoundly treated; and that I...
I have now the honour to inclose to the President and Directors of the Literary Fund (to be laid before the Legislature at their next succeeding Meeting) the Report of the disbursements, the funds on hand, and a general statement of the condition of the University of Virginia, agreed to by the Rector and Visitors at their last meeting on the 7th of October, together with the documents to which...
I have recd. yours of the 21st. The proceedings of the State Conventions–on the Constitution of the U. S. in my possession are 1. Of Massachussetts in a thick pamphlet. 2. New York, also a thick pamphlet. 3. Pennsylva. a thin vol: in boards, containing the Speeches of Mr. Wilson, and Mr. McKean, both in favor of the Constitution. The Speeches of other members, were not published at the same...
Your letter & commununications of the 18th. having remained a day or two at our post office, I have been obliged to give in some haste, the final extent & shape to the Report for the Legislature; and after all to leave a couple of blanks which I must ask the favour of you to fill; and then forward the Report directly to Richmond. In filling the blanks, the guide will be the paper of the Come....
I have just recd. the inclosed letter, with the notice it refers to, which I have duly acknowledgd Be so good as to hand the paper to Mr Wood as requested and to give < > whatever attention may be proper on the part of the Univy. I have not seen the Act of Assembly; but take for granted the course pursued is authorized by it. Draft (DLC) .
It may be proper to mention, that the Salary is now limited to $1000 per annum to be pd. quarterly, with fees from the pupils from 10 to 20 drs. each according to the no. of Schools they attend, and with the use of a pavilion such as you have free of rent. The duties of this Chair embrace the Latin & Greek Languages, < > Rhetoric, Belles Lettres, ancient history & ancient Geography. During the...
—confided to them. As the result they have the satisfaction to state a marked improvement in the economy of the Institution, & in the habits of the Students; and as a consequence, this in the degree wherein they appear to have availed themselves of the advantages held out by the able professors whose services the University is so fortunate in possessing. On this subject there is little else to...
I inclose by Mr. Loren 2 letters which he has just handed to me. They explain his object, & the grounds on which the writers espouse it. One of them Mr L must be known to you, by reputation at least The other Col. Storrow stands very high with all who are acquainted with him. I can add nothing to what is said in behalf of Mr L. but that I know nothing that can derogate from it Draft (DLC) .
I have recd. your favor of the 16th. What relates to the University will be subjects for our conversation. I can not so far avail myself of your dispensation from giving answers to your letters, which I am sure will always merit them as not to make my acknowledgment for the kind indulgence, and to express the pleasure which will be afforded by the promised visit of Mr Terrell & yourself. In...
The other volumes contain of I notes of conversations, whilst Secretary of State, with President Washington and others high in office; and Memoranda of Cabinet Councils committed to paper on the spot & filed; the whole, with the explanatory & miscellaneous additions, shewing the views and tendencies of parties, from the year 1789 to 1800. II Letters from 1779 to his death, addressed to a great...
Exceptions to the maxim that commerce should be free 1. In cases where other nations would not follow the example, or admit a reciprocity. 2. To procure safety at the expence of interest--as in naval resources & other means of defence 3. To secure the means of transporting articles of commerce agst. the contingency of wars among carrying Nations which divert or raise the price & ensurance of...
Yours returning the letters of Genl. Lafayette & Ruggi have been recd. I did not know as much before of Ruggi’s standing. His want of prudence is deeply stamped on own acct. of himself. I hope you & Genl. Cocke will proceed in regard to the Steps & pavement for the Rotunda according to your own Judgt. in which I have entire Confidence. Draft (DLC) .
The D. of Trust--to J. M. witht. namg. Heirs or Exor [Executor]; Can Attorney be made to Exec: the instrnts--sue for them--& proceed to enforce the Mortgage. The trust being power to Will can that vary or explain its import. How divided between Wife & Children? if will be in those vague terms! Bridge Stock What the character of the assignment of it--according to Statemt. in Mrs. Ts letter if...
I recd. some days ago your friendly communication of the 7th. I regret the continuance of circumstances wch. suggested it. I hope you will be satisfied with the footing on which I have put your claim for the arrears due from J. P. T. Inconsiderable as the amount may be thought, such have been the failures of my crops & the prices for them for a series of years, & such the utter failures of...
My dearest. My last was so full that it has left me little to add General Cocke joined on tuesday afternoon which makes up a board, but we are chiefly engaged with the Examinations, which go on very well. I fear it will be impossible to get away before the middle of next week. I need not say how anxious I am to be with you. We have dined every day from home since we arrived except the first &...
My dearest here we are snug in a warm room consoling ourselves on our escape from the Storm, by our safe arrival, mine about 2 O.C. yesterday, Mr. Monroe’s last night. We found the road so good that it was difficult to avoid getting to Mr Nelson’s too soon. We found them well except young Mrs. N. whose indisposition tho’ not serious, suspended, if nothing more, the trip below. Mr Monroe set...
I wrote you my beloved by the mail of tuesday, and hoped it would be the last from this place, with fears however that overbalanced hope. It appears now not to be certain that I shall be able to get away even tomorrow (friday). Every exertion however will be made to effect it. The Examinations, did not close till last night, and our attendance on them left the other business undone during that...
At the request of Mr Reynolds Chapman, a very respectable neighbour, I take the liberty of making him known to you, for a purpose which he will particularly explain. I understand that as Executor to Doctor Shepherd, who was another respectable neighbour he has occasion, in adjusting a transaction relating to the Estate of the latter, to obtain some information from the President or Cashier of...
Your letter of the 3d. inst: having come to hand whilst I was at our University, whence I have just returned, I had an opportunity of making its contents known at once to Mr. Long Professor of Ancient Languages. It appeared that he had thoughts of employing a Tutor, to assist him in his duty to a Class which had become so numerous as to make one useful; and that but for the youthfulness of...
The Copy of your Message to Congress transmitted under your Cover, having arrived during an absence at our University from which I am but just returned, a regretted delay has taken place in acknowledging the favor. I now offer my thanks for it, with an expression of the due sense I have of the increased interest given to the topics embraced in the Communication, by the eloquent and impressive...
$600 I promise to pay to Chester Bailey or order, on or before the first day of July one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight, six hundred dollars with interest thereon from October 23. 1826, in discharge of a note of that date and for that amount, from J. Payne Todd to the said C. Bailey, and by his endorsement, assigned to me. RC (Mr. and Mrs. Philip D. Sang, Chicago, Illinois).
In fulfilment of my promise I send you Dr. Coopers Lectures on Political Economy. I do not wish to hurry a return of the volume. But having not yet had leisure to look over it, It will suit me to have it again, after you have made yourself as much acquainted with its contents, and as much at your leisure, as you chuse The Talents and information of the Author, never fail to throw light on...
I send you the commencing paragraph for the Report of the Board of Visitors, which in a more hasty draft had a sanction at the moment of our separation. I thought it best, to lose no time in enabling you to compleat the Report, that none may be lost in forwarding it to its destination, and I trust I shall have the pleasure of receiving it, from your own hand rather than thro’ the mail. Health...
When, in answer to yours of April 14. I intimated that I could not conveniently anticipate the payment of my note in your hands it was not <only> my purpose to be punctual at its maturity, but I relied with entire confidence <on> the allotted means. It is with serious concern, the more so as the occur<re>nce is so new to me, that I am under the necessity of disappointing a creditor. I had in...
On my return from a visit to our University I recd your letter of the 10th. If I commend your zeal on a subject you deem both just & important, I must regret that you ascribe to my opinion on it, an influence wch experience does not warrant; and that you cast your eye on one only of the grounds on which I declined an interposition. The other, my advanced stage of life, and the appropriation of...
Your very kind communication of Novr. 22. came duly to hand, and I am particularly thankful for your attention to the wish intimated thro’ Mr. Cabell. It was a sight of the Legislative Journals of 1784-5.6.7. that I had occasion for; and unless the Vols. No. 4 or 5, contain extracts for some of those years, the trouble of sending them would be without avail. It is not surprizing, because so...
The two copies of your Lectures on Political Economy forwarded with your letter Novr. 15. were duly recd. That for Mr. Eppes was delivered to Mr. Trist of the Monticello family who said he could send it on forthwith by a safe conveyance. For the other addressed to myself, I offer my thanks. Before I had time to look into the volume, I had an opportunity of handing it over to Professor Tucker,...
I have just recd. the inclosed papers from the University. They give a sad account of the Hotel Keepers. Not recollecting the exact relation in which these are placed by the last enactment to the several Authorities above them, I can not decide well on what may be required from the Executive Committee. Be so good as to favor me with your ideas on the whole subject. In every view, delays must...
I leave the inclosed open that you may see the papers relating <to> the Hotel Keepers: Should Genl. Cocke, unexpectedly at this season, be in Charlottesv<ille> be so obliging as to have the letter put into his hands; in the contrary event, into t<he> proper mail. I enclose for you Mr. Brokenboroughs report to be assorted with the other documents accompanying that to go from the Rector: on...
I have duly recd the copy of your Eulogy on Adams Jefferson & Shelby; and I can not return you my thanks without alluding to the particular value given to it by facts which it records; as well as to the additional interest it deserves from the glowing patriotism which pervades it. May I remark at the same time that it has not escaped circumstancial errors which will probably be corrected by a...
I have been favored with a printed copy of the Report of a Select Committee of the Senate on a proposed amendt of the Constitution of the U. S. Inferring from an appearance on the Envelope, that I am indebted for the communication to the politeness of the Chairman, I beg leave to make my acknowledgments accordingly. And in doing it, I ought not to suppress the remark, that whatever differences...