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    • Madison, James
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    • Everett, Edward

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Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James" AND Recipient="Everett, Edward"
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I have received the copy of your address to the two branches of the Legislature, which I have read with much pleasure. It is what I should have taken for certain it would be, a very able document, and of a character appropriate to the occasion. I am not sure however, that I ought to congratulate you on the event, which led to the address, since it withdraws your services from a wider theatre,...
J. Madison tenders his thanks to Mr Everett for his interesting and eloquent address at Bloody Brook. It has been read with much pleasure; and with a full perception of its parentage in all the lineaments of the Offspring. RC ( MHi : Everett Collection); FC (DLC) .
J. Madison with his best respects to Mr. Everett tenders his thanks for the copy of his address delivered at Amherst College. He may say of it, and he says much in doing so, that it is worthy not only of the occasion but of the Author. RC , FC (DLC) .
I have duly recd. your favour, postmarked the 9th. inst. containing your suggestion on the subject of my manuscript papers. I am fully aware that these, as far as worthy of the public eye, could pass to it, under no editorial auspices with greater advantages than under yours; and I have a just sensibility to the friendly dispositions, as far as these could be properly indulged, with which the...
(I have received the copy of your Eulogy on Lafayette; and tho’ obliged in my present condition to read but little at a time, have gone through it, and with great pleasure, finding a reward in every page as I proceeded. It is a fine picture finely framed, with a likeness faithful to the noble original; the more noble for having renounced the vain title. It cannot fail to be universally...
J. Madison with his cordial respects to Mr. Everett thanks him for the Copy of his excellent & very interesting address to the Phi Beta Kappa Society in Yale College. RC (John E. Boos Collection); draft (DLC) .
I recd. in due time the copy of your Address at Worcester on the last 4th. of July, and I tender my thanks for it. Its value is enhanced by the recurrence to remote events, interesting to the history of our Country. It would be well if all our Anniversary Orators, would follow the example of substituting for a part at least of their eloquent repetitions, occurrences, now new because they have...
I have duly recd. your letter of the 24th ult: I should always feel pleasure in complying with your wishes. But in the present instance, besides that the task however abridged, would not accord with my prolonged indisposition, and other claims on the scanty intervals of relief, there is another obstacle, which I could not well get over. It will suffice to say of it, that it is nowise...
I am indebted to you I observe for a copy of Mr. Doddridge’s speech on the subject of Congressional privelege. A part of it has been read to me and judging from that of what remains, I need not hesitate to pronounce it an able one as was to be expected from its able author. As he is under a mistake in supposing me to have drawn the judicial act of 1789 and wishes for information, it may be...
I received your letter of the 29. ultimo with every wish to attempt a compliance with its request; but for some days past I have been suffering under a bilious attack now confining me to my bed which disqualifies me from mental exertion, as my rheumatism does my hands and fingers from the search into papers which are voluminous and without an index; whilst My recollection affords me no...
I have just discovered that in my letter of the 5th I overlooked your inquiry as to the accuracy of Lloyds debates. The accuracy of them is not to be relied on, though the ideas of the speakers, may for the most part be collected from them. The face of the debates shews that they are defective, and desultory, where not revised, or written out by the Speakers. In some instances, he makes them...
I have received your letter of the 23d Decr. and am glad that the precaution of sending you a copy of my letter of the 14th of Novr. saved me from the appearance of inattention to which the miscarriage of the original exposed me. I wish I could abridge your researches into the period between 1783. 87. by referring to particular documents and publications throwing light upon it; but my memory...
In my letter thanking you for the Copy of your address to the American Institute of New York I took occasion to remind you of the little pamphlet addressed by the Virginia Assembly of 98 to its Constituents and of the other containing the report of a Committee of the legislature of South Carolina in 28. They were enclosed to you at or about the date of my letter published in the North American...
I return you many thanks for the copy of your late address to the "American Institute of N. York." It is as beautiful in some of its features as it is instructive in its general character. I have read it with the greater pleasure, as it goes back to times and scenes in which I was often an actor, always an observer; and which are too much overlooked in discussing the objects & meaning of the...
It occurs that the notions prevailing here agst. any subordination in the highest Judicial Authy of the State to that of the U. S. & the spirit of Criticism of which there have been examples, may render the word concurrent , preferable to that of co-ordinate as applied in one of the paragraphs of my letter of —Be so good therefore as to erase the latter & insert the former. The change seems to...
The copy of your Lecture on the Working Men’s party was duly recd; and presuming you to be now at Washington, I address thither my thanks for the pleasure afforded by the judicious interesting and well-timed observations, which you availed yourself of the occasion to inculcate. With cordial esteem RC ( MHi : Everett Collection); draft (DLC) .
I return my thanks for your favour of the 28. ult. with a copy of the Chapter from the N. A. Review for this month. I have read the review of the Debates with great pleasure. It must diffuse light on the subject of them every where; and would make an overwhelming impression where it is most needed, if the delirious excitement were not it would seem, an overmatch for reason & truth. The only...
Since my letter in which I expressed a belief that there was no ground for supposing that the Kentucky Resolutions of -99 in which the term "nullification appears, were drawn by Mr. Jefferson, I infer from a manuscript paper of his, just noticed, containing the term, that altho’ he had, probably no agency in the draft, nor even any knowledge of it at the time, yet that the term was borrowed...
In the letter inclosed by the last mail, I omitted to insert in the margin, the extract from the "Federalist" referred to in the text. Be so good as to supply the omission by subjoining in the margin the following transcribed passages from No. 39.* *No. 39. "It is true, that in controversies relating to the boundary between the two jurisdictions, the tribunal which is ultimately to decide, is...
I inclose the letter promised. You will perceive that some of the topics deserved more development, than the state of my health, and the limited time would permit. The right of the States collectively to hold the States individually to a bargain, a breach of which by a single one would throw the whole into confusion, and essentially affect the interests of some of them, merits an illustration,...
I have duly received your letter in which you refer to the "nullifying doctrine" advocated, as a Constitutional right, by some of our distinguished fellow citizens; and to the proceedings of the Virginia Legislature in -98 & 99, as appealed to in behalf of that doctrine; and you express a wish for my ideas on those subjects. I am aware of the delicacy of the task in some respects, and the...
I have recd. yours of the 11th. inst: & wish I could give the information it asks with the desired particularity and certainty. I believe, though I may possibly be wrong, that no answers to the Virginia Resolutions of -98, were given by States, other than those enumerated in the pamphlet you have. I have not the means of ascertaining the fact. If any instructions were given by the Legislature...
J. Madison with his best respects to Mr. Everett, thanks him for the Copy of his "Address on the Centennial Anniversary of the Arrival of Governour Winthrop at Charlestown" The theme, interesting as it is, in itself, derives new attraction from the touching details and appropriate reflections woven into the Address. J. M takes this occasion of thanking Mr. E. for the copy heretofore forwarded,...
Your favour of the 11th. was duly recd. I had noticed the stress laid in a late debate, on the proceedings of the Virga. Legislature in. 1798-9. as supporting the nullifying doctrine so called; and the frequent references also to my participation in those proceedings. But altho’ regretting the erroneous views taken of them, and making no secret of my opinions, I was unwilling to obtrude any...
I consult the wishes of Mr. Sparks in making you a channel of communication with him. Should he not have arrived at Washington, be so good as to retain the inclosed letter till you can deliver it in person, or till otherwise advised by him or by me. I take this occasion, Sir, to thank you for the copies of Mr. Webster’s and Mr. Sprague’s late speeches. They do honor, both of them, to the...
I take the liberty of enclosing a letter for Mr. Sparks, which you will oblige me by having delivered to him on his arrival at Boston, or forwarded under the proper direction in case he should end his voyage elsewhere, & not be soon expected there. The object of the letter is to spare him the trouble of fulfilling a promise, which since his departure for Europe, has been found to be...
I have recd. the Copy of your Speech on the 1st. of Feby. which led you into the subject of our Foreign Intercourse. It is justly observed that there are no subjects within the circle of our Federal transactions, on which the Public Mind is more susceptible of erroneous impressions, than the arrangements & provisions for diplomatic Missions. The explanatory views you have given of the policy &...
I offer for your brother and yourself the thanks I owe for the copy of his work on "America." It well sustains the reputation for talents and learning acquired by his former work on "Europe." I have found in the volume many proofs of original as well as enlarged views, and not a few passages of glowing eloquence. With this just tribute I must be allowed to combine the remark, that my trains of...
Your letter of the 3d. inst: having come to hand whilst I was at our University, whence I have just returned, I had an opportunity of making its contents known at once to Mr. Long Professor of Ancient Languages. It appeared that he had thoughts of employing a Tutor, to assist him in his duty to a Class which had become so numerous as to make one useful; and that but for the youthfulness of...
I have duly recd. your favor of Mar. 29. accompanied by the two copies, one, of your Speech on a proposed amendment of the Constitution of the U.S., the other, of a Report on the Mission to Panama. The documents contain very able & interesting views of their respective subjects, and belong to the select class of Materials for an instructive history of the discussions & proceedings of the...