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5 January 1796. JM has sold to Theodorus Bailey and John B. Van Wyck his land known as lot number two of the Sedachqueda Patent in the Mohawk Valley of New York, amounting to approximately nine hundred acres, at $5.83⅓ per acre, for a total of $5,250. Bailey and Van Wyck have paid JM $4,000 and have given him a note for $1,250 payable on or before 1 Jan. 1797. The parties agree to have the...
Substance of a Conversation held by Js. Madison Jr with Col: Beckwith, at the desire of Mr. Jefferson— Last evening offered the first opportunity of breaking to Col B—— the subject for which he has been thought a proper channel to the Governour of Canada. It was explicitly made known to him, that besides its being generally understood that the N. W. Indians were supplied with the means of war...
Abstract. 15 October 1792. John Taliaferro Brooke, having purchased lot 127 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, from James Monroe and Eliza his wife, conveys that lot to Robert Mercer for £435. Witnessed by JM, John Minor, Jr., and Joseph Jones. Recorded 8 Nov. 1792. Printed extract (Crozier, Virginia County Records: Spotsylvania County , p. 456).
16 September 1793, Orange County, Virginia. Indenture by which JM purchases from Elizabeth Chew for £3 about thirty acres of land in Orange County, part of the Black Level tract. Letterbook copy ( Vi : Orange County Courthouse Records). 2 pp. Witnessed by James Taylor, James Taylor, Jr., and Roger Bell. Recorded at Orange County Court on 23 Sept. 1793 by James Taylor, clerk of the court.
The House went into a Committee of the Whole to consider the report of the Committee of Claims on Gilbert Dench ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States … (42 vols.; Washington, 1834–56). , 4th Cong., 2d sess., 1835–36). Messrs. Madison … were of opinion, that if Mr. Dench had any claim it was upon the state of Massachusetts, and not upon the United...
Document not found. Ca. 18 December 1795. Presented by JM to the House of Representatives, 18 Dec. 1795. Reported in Philadelphia Gazette , 19 Dec. 1795.
10 January 1797, Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. Dolley Madison and JM brought suit against Edward Heston to recover costs incurred by Dolley Madison and the late John Todd for nursing and burying Heston’s son, Isaac, in 1793. The plaintiffs abandoned the cause and agreed to a nonsuit. Ms ( InU ). 3 pp. Notes on the case taken by Jonathan Williams, who was associate judge of the court of...
The Representatives of the People of the United States present their congratulations on the event by which your fellow-citizens have attested the pre-eminence of your merit. You have long held the first place in their esteem: you have often received tokens of their affection. You now possess the only proof that remained of their gratitude for your services, of their reverence for your wisdom,...
I did not receive your favor of Sepr. 2d. the only one yet come to hand, till yesterday. The account of your arrival and reception had some time ago found its way to us thro’ the English Gazettes. The language of your address to the Convention was certainly very grating to the ears of many here; and would no doubt have employed the tongues and the pens too of some of them, if external as well...
It was fortunate that a duplicate of your letter to Mr. Jefferson went so soon from Alexandria. The copy in My hands did not find a conveyance fit to be trusted for a very long time—it cannot have reached him yet. I was determined to await a secure opportunity, and the intermission of the French Packet left such an one extremely rare. I was compelled at last to put it into the hands of a...
Nicholas called for a committee “to enquire how far the act of Congress for the defence of the frontier had been complied with, and what number of the men ordered to be raised are yet to be enlisted.” JM had reported that act from committee in 1792 ( PJM , 14:199 and n. 1 ). Mr. Madison observed that a gentleman from New-Jersey (Mr. Dayton) had stated three different ways, in which the act was...
Letter not found. 21 July 1791. Acknowledged in Jefferson to JM, 24 July 1791 . In his list of letters to Jefferson (DLC: Rives Collection, Madison Papers), JM noted that this letter, like that of 13 July, concerned “Publicola.” Perhaps this was JM’s letter of 21 July to an unspecified correspondent, listed in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 (1892), p. 262.
The inclosed papers which I have got from Mr. Beckleys office furnishes an answer to your letter. There is a Bill depending in favor of claims barred by the limitation of time—which if it passes will provide for those of Owen & Woods as I understand the tenor of the Bill and the nature of their claims. As soon as the fate of the Bill is decided I shall write to the parties. RC ( DLC :...
I wrote some days ago to my brother Ambrose since which little has taken place worth adding. The inclosed newspapers contain a sketch of what has been done in the House of Reps. I mentioned to my brother that I thought it better to ship or postpone the sale of Tobo. than to sell at the present price in the Country. I am more & more convinced that this will be prudent. The price has risen...
Letter not found. 13 January 1796. Acknowledged in Murray and Company to JM, 20 Jan. 1796 . Discusses payment of the expenses of importing furniture from France.
Letter not found. Ca. 23 November 1793. Mentioned in JM to James Madison, Sr., 25 Nov. 1793 : “I wrote from Fredg. by Col: Monroe’s servant & informed you that I had left with Mr. Jones £18–12–5 which would be del[i]vered to your order.”
Letter not found. 3 May 1790. Offered for sale in the Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 468, May 1943.
The bearer will deliver two of your books which have been some time in my hands. I add to them a pamphlet recd. not long since from France. I can not recommend it because I have not read it. The subject tho’ a hackneyed is an interesting one, and the titles of some of the chapters promising. You will soon discover how far it may be worth your perusal. The inclosed letter to Genl. Schuyler...
I am just favd. with yours of the 30th. inst: and am glad to find your sentiments so decided as to the power of removal by the Presidt. Every letter to me, and as far as I know to others here, from Virga. ratifies the propriety of the decision of Congress. Our last discussions of moment have turned on the Compensations. The bill as gone to the Senate, allows Six dollars a day to the members of...
Among the various reforms which have been offered to the world, the projects for universal peace have done the greatest honor to the hearts, though they seem to have done very little to the heads of their authors. Rousseau, the most distinguished of these philanthropists, has recommended a confederation of sovereigns, under a council of deputies, for the double purpose of arbitrating external...
I have recd. your letter with the unsealed one for Monroe & have forwarded the latter. Your subsequent one, which I calculate to have been written on the 12th. inst: came to hand two days ago. I feel for your situation but you must bear it. Every consideration private as well as public require a further sacrifice of your longings for the repose of Monticello. You must not make your final exit...
Under consideration was an amendment providing for one representative for every thirty thousand people until the number reached one hundred. Ames proposed a ratio of one for every forty thousand. Mr. Madison. I cannot concur in sentiment with the gentleman last up, that 1 representative for 40,000 inhabitants will conciliate the minds of those to the government, who are desirous of amendments;...
I make use of the opportunity afforded by the return of Col. Hoomes to inclose a parcel of the late newspapers, which may contain some things not in the other papers you get. You will find in them all the particulars known here concerning the affairs of France; and sketches of the business as yet brought before Congress. The Presidents Speech & the two answers are I believe also in the...
Your 3 favors from G. Town, Bladg. and Balte: have come safe to hand. The accident mentioned in the 2d. has caused no small anxiety; which would be much greater were it not hoped from your not waiting to repair it, that a safe train had been laid for the purpose, and particularly that the article had been put under seal. The possibility of its falling into base hands at the present crisis...
The Constitution limited the apportionment ratio to no more than one representative to every 30,000 persons. With the 1790 census completed, reapportionment became necessary. On 15 November 1791, following a debate in which such lower ratios as 1:34,000 and 1:40,000 were proposed, JM voted with the majority in the House for a 1:30,000 ratio. On 22 November the Committee of the Whole debated...
Letter not found. Ca. 1 April 1790. Acknowledged in Stephen to JM, 25 Apr. 1790 . Gives views on the assumption of state debts.
The inclosed letter with a pamphlet under the same cover came to me a few days ago from the post Office with a charge of a dollar postage. I have delayed to forward it till further expence cd. be avoided. The pamphlet I will send by the first good oppy. I have your favor of the 26th. Ult, corroborating the view I had before recd. of matters at Richmond. There is likely to be a Quorum of both...
At the request of Mr. R. Harrison, who is well acquainted with the Bearer Mr. James H. Hooe, I introduce this Gentleman to your civilities. He is charged with some business interesting to a friend of Mr. Harrison, which it is supposed may be aided by your advice, and perhaps claim your official attention. These considerations will more than apologize for the liberty I have taken, and will...
I have been favd. with yours of the 30 Ult. and thank you for your remarks on the Judiciary bill. I am glad to find you concurring in the decision as to the power of removal. It seems to meet with general approbation North of Virga. and there too as far as I yet learn. Mr. Pendleton is fully in opinion with you. So is Monroe I am told . The more the question is weighed the more proper I think...
On my arrival here about ten days ago I found your favor of Jany. 29. for which I am now to thank you. The one from me prior to that you acknowledge and which seems to have miscarried, requested such information as you have now been kind eno’ to give me. If on the further enquiry you propose to make[,] any new light should be thrown on the joint affairs of my late brother and myself, you will...