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    • Madison, James
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    • Monroe, James
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I did not receive your favor of Sepr. 2d. the only one yet come to hand, till yesterday. The account of your arrival and reception had some time ago found its way to us thro’ the English Gazettes. The language of your address to the Convention was certainly very grating to the ears of many here; and would no doubt have employed the tongues and the pens too of some of them, if external as well...
At the request of Mr. R. Harrison, who is well acquainted with the Bearer Mr. James H. Hooe, I introduce this Gentleman to your civilities. He is charged with some business interesting to a friend of Mr. Harrison, which it is supposed may be aided by your advice, and perhaps claim your official attention. These considerations will more than apologize for the liberty I have taken, and will...
14 December 1794, Philadelphia. Introduces Robert S. Van Rensselaer, who “proposes to make a tour through some parts of Europe, and wishes for an opportunity of being made known to you.” RC ( MH ). 1 p. Addressed by JM to Monroe, “Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States / Paris,” and marked “Mr. Van Renselaer.” Calendared as letter not found in PJM Robert J. Brugger et al., eds., The...
Letter not found. Ca. 17 September 1792. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 18 Sept. 1792 . Encloses a draft of the article that Monroe revised and Dunlap’s Am. Daily Advertiser published on 22 Sept. Also encloses excerpts from Jefferson’s correspondence that were quoted in this article (see Monroe to JM, 9 Oct. 1792 ).
After all the vicissitudes through which the assumption has passed, it seems at present in a fair way to succeed as part of the general plan for the public debt. The Senate have included it among their amendments to the funding bill, and a vote of yesterday in the House of Representatives indicates a small majority in favor of the measure. In its present form it will very little affect the...
I have written several letters of late in which I have been pretty full in my details and remarks. In one of them I acknowledged your letter to Mr. R of Decr. 18. and stated my reasons for not witholding it. I have since recd. the original of that letter sent by the way of Havre, together with the copies of it submitted to my discretion; which I have thought it most consistent with your...
I have written you several particular letters latterly, & now add this for a conveyance of which I am just apprised. The British Treaty, is still in the situation explained in my last. Several circumstances have indicated an intention in the Executive to lay it before the House of Reps. but it has not yet taken place. There is reason to believe that some egregious misconception of ideas has...
Letter not found. 14 December 1794, Philadelphia. Introduces Robert S. Van Rensselaer. RC offered for sale by Leonard & Co., Auctioneers, Catalogue of a Valuable Private Library, Including … Rare Autograph Letters (Boston, 9 May 1866), p. 15, item 7.
Since my last I have had the pleasure of your two favors of Ocr. 23 & 24. The business of the Treaty with G. B. remains as it stood. A copy of the British ratification has arrived; but the Executive wait, it seems, for the original as alone proper for communication. In the mean time, altho’ it is probable that the house if brought to say yea or nay directly on the merits of the treaty will...
The letters from you of latest date are those of Octr. 23. 24, & 29—and of Jany 12 & 20th. The three first have been heretofore acknowledged. For the interesting contents of the two last I now thank you. I have given the explanation you desired, as to Mr. Paine, to F. A. M. who has not recd. any letter as yet, and has promised to pay due regard to your request. It is proper you should know...
An answer to your favor of the 5th. has been delayed by my hourly expectation of hearing from Taylor. A few days ago he came to Town and I have had an interview and settlement with him. The balance with the interests at 7 PerCt. was 864 dollars. He has not however executed the conveyance for want of some chart which he could not get here, but has entered into bond to do so by August, with good...
Since sealing the inclosed I have a letter from Mr. Jef—son of Aprl. 7. He says war is certainly declared between Engd. & F. & inclosed a newspaper which gives the acct. The decln. commenced on the part of the latter, and seems to be grounded on its alledged actual existance on the part of the former. “An impeachment (says Mr. J.) is ordered here agst. Nicholson the Comptroller, by a vote...
Letter not found. Ca. 5 July 1789. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 19 July 1789 . Reports passage of impost and tonnage bills by Congress.
My last was written about ten days ago for a conveyance intimated to be in the view of the office of State. I have since that recd. yours committed to Mr. Swan and two hours ago that of Deer. 18. covering the private one for Mr. Randolph. The other referred to as sent by the way of Havre is not yet come to hand. Mr. Swan is much embarrassed in his operations by the enormous price of Wheat and...
A letter chiefly on private subjects written about 10 days ago will accompany this, which I have postponed to the last moment of the oppy. by Mr. Fulton. This will relate chiefly to the British Treaty & to subjects connected with it. For a general view of the proceedings of Congs I refer to the Newspapers &c. which Mr. Fulton will receive for you, from myself, & other friends. You will find...
I have been some days in debt for your favour of the 19th. Ult. Notwithstanding the time I have been here Taylor has never made any application on the subject of our purchase nor have I ever found that he has himself been in the City. Whence his silence has proceeded I am not able to say. It has frequently occurred to me to write to him, and I should probably have done so long since; had I not...
Your favor of the 19th. of May has been duly received. The information relating to your little daughter has been communicated as you desired. I hope she is by this time entirely recovered. Your friends in Broad way were well two evenings ago. I have paid the money to Taylor, and hope you will take the time you intimate, for replacing my advances on your account. The assumption has been revived...
I wrote to you yesterday acknowledging yours by Mr. Swan and answering that of the 18th. Decr. which covered your very interesting remarks in a confidential letter to Mr. Randolph. The latter was sent to Mr. R today, there being no good reason for witholding it as you authorised me to do. I write this cheifly on acct. of the Bearer Mr. John Mercer son of our friend the judge, who means to...
Your note of the 8th. March left in Philada. was not put into my hands till the 24th. I immediately took the proper steps for complying with the desire of Mr. Brackenridge, and now inclose the information obtained for him. The Books are to be had according to the Editions & prices annexed to his list of Mr. Rice of this City. Should Mr. Brackenridge be satisfied with them, which in most...
I have recd. within a short period your three favors of March 24. May 7. & July 5th. with a few lines added on the 13th. Before this reaches you, you will no doubt have received the act of the Executive which relieves you from the dilemma of chusing between the two evils of bearing or abandoning your public situation. This extraordinary measure was so little apprehended by me that I...
You will find in the inclosed papers some account of the proceedings on the question relating to the seat of Government. The Senate have hung up the vote for Baltimore, which, as you may suppose, could not have been seriously meant by many who joined in it. It is not improbable that the permanent seat may be coupled with the temporary one. The Potowmac stands a bad chance, and yet it is not...
The articles sent to Havre, came as you anticipated, in the same vessel with Mr. Murray, to N. York, from whence they have safely arrived here. They lay us under very great obligations to your kindness, and are the more valuable, as we venture to consider them as bearing the sanction of Mrs. Monroe’s taste as well as yours. The carpets, in particular, are truly important acquisitions. In the...
Since I parted from you I have had several letters from Mr. J. in which all the facts involving Genét are detailed. His conduct has been that of a madman. He is abandoned even by his votaries in Philada. Hutcheson declares that he has ruined the Republican interest in that place. I wish I could forward the details I have recd. but they are too confidential to be hazarded by the casual...
The last of your favors come to hand bears date Sepr. 8. 1795, of which a duplicate has also been received. The others which it may be proper to acknowledge or reacknowledge, are of Novr. 30th. 1794. which was opened at Halifax, & forwarded to me in that state. Decr. 18. 1794. covering a copy of one of same date to Mr. Randolph —Feby. 18. 1795. covering a copy of one of Feby. 12. to the same....
My last with some pamphlets & Newspapers was put into the care of Mr. Fulton, who, I had hoped was half across the Atlantic, when he reappeared here in consequence of shipwreck. I avail myself of his second departure to add a little more to the printed budget, as well as to the narrative in my letter. At the date of it, the British Treaty was in full discussion, and the event hanging in...
You will find by one of the Gazettes herewith sent, that the bill fixing the permanent seat of Government on the Potowmac, and the temporary at Philadelphia, has got through the Senate. It passed by a single voice only, Izzard and Few having both voted against it. Its passage through the House of Representatives is probable, but attended with great difficulties. If the Potowmac succeeds, even...
Your favor of the 9th. was yesterday delivered by the Bearer. The letter from N. Y. is truly embarrassing. My present view of the subject of it, is precisely that stated in your remarks. It is proper however that we shd. see one another before any answer be given, and that we shd. in the mean time weigh the subject in every scale. I will lose no time in dropping down to Fredg: but it can not...
Along with this I forward a large packet which Mr. Beckley has been so kind as to make up for you. It will give you such information as is not contained in the newspapers, and which forms a proper supplement to them. I have not yet recd. a single line from you except yours of Sepr. 2d. long since acknowledged. Your last letters of the official kind were duplicates of Ocr. 16. Novr. 7. & 20....
I have been favored with yours of April . The newspapers will have given you some idea of our proceedings, though in a state always mutilated, and often perverted. The Impost is still the subject of deliberation. The general quantum of duties has at some periods been a source of discussion. At others, the ratio of particular duties, have produced still more of it. The proper one between rum &...
I understand by the waggoner charged with bringing up our several articles from Fredericksburg and who returned on friday that the Vessel had not sailed from Philada. when last heard of; but was expected at Fredg. by the time of his getting down again. As he set out with another load immediately, he is probably there by this time, and may be looked for here about wednesday or thursday. It will...
Inclosed are two Newspapers one of which contains the Resolutions proposed at Fredg. and a letter from Bourdeaux which is not uninteresting. You will find also two pieces one from Alexanda. & another answering it which as connected with the present crisis may be worth reading. At Culpeper Court, the proposed meeting took effect, Genl. Stephens in the Chair. The result as stated to me, is not...
Memorandum The wants incident to my new situation seduce me into an unwilling tax on your goodness. As it is probable that many articles of furniture at second hand, may be had in Paris, which cannot be had here of equal quality, but at a forbidding price, it has occurred to me, to ask the favor of you to have the following procured & forwarded. 1. Suit of Bed Curtains of Damask, Chints, or...