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9 October 1801, New York. In accordance with his letter of “yesterday & this day,” has drawn on JM for $9,000 in favor of David Gelston, who advanced the money for his outfit. RC ( DNA : RG 59, DD , France, vol. 8). 1 p.; docketed by Wagner as received 13 Oct.
New York, 3 Mch. 1788 . Introducing Mr. Adrian Kissam “a young gentleman of the profession of the law” who has very respectable connections. RC ( NNP ); 2 p.; endorsed.
[ July 25, 1777. On July 29, 1777, Hamilton wrote to Livingston: “I have the pleasure of your favour of the 25th.” Letter not found. ]
[ Kingston, New York, June 25, 1777. On June 28, 1777, Hamilton wrote to Robert R. Livingston: “Yours of the 25th came to hand last night.” Letter not found. ]
Letter not found. 9 September 1803 . Calendared as a three-page letter in the lists probably made by Peter Force (DLC, series 7, container 2).
I last night did myself the honor to write to your Excellency—This is only designed to cover the inclosed to Genl Carleton Congress having referred it generally to you. I have the honor to be with great esteem & respect Dr Sir Your Excellencys Most Obt Hum: Servt CSmH .
Resolved That no question general or particular shall be [put] in this [Committee] upon the proposed constitution of Government for the United States or upon any clause or article thereof nor upon any amendment which may be proposed thereto until after the said constitution [& Amendments] shall have been [considered Clause by Clause]. D , in the writings of Robert R. Livingston and H, John...
10 October 1801, New York. Reports Boston “got off the rocks last night” undamaged and will be ready to sail by Tuesday [13 Oct.]. In postscript, states that accounts from France confirm British capture of Cairo; believes Alexandria will follow. Notes that yellow fever in city has ceased. RC ( DNA : RG 59, DD , France, vol. 8). 1 p.; docketed by Wagner. The Boston finally sailed on 15 Oct....
Letter not found: from Robert R. Livingston, 15 May 1789. On 31 May GW wrote to Livingston : “I . . . apologize for this late acknowledgment of your letter of the 15th instant.”
My anxiety for the supplies of the army have brought me to this place in order that I might satisfy myself as to the quantity on hand, & the means of forwarding them—Genl Nox has communicated to me your Excellencys orders on this subject—Nothing short of this would I am fully persuaded be of sufficient force to produce the desired effect—And knowledge of them will in a great measure render the...
Not knowing where to direct the enclosed I submit to your care. The bearer of this to Nantes waits so that I can write you nothing but that the Loussiana [ sic ] armament is still ice bound. The floridas not yet ceded owing I believe to some difficulty about parma & the solicitude of the Emperor of Russia to provide for the King of Sardinia. Spain is however prepared to make the cession & I...
“The fact of the fall of stones from the sky, having been put, by some late inquiries almost beyond a doubt the philosophers are now disputing whether they are generated in the atmosphere or whether we owe them to volcanic eruptions in the moon, as much remains to be said on both sides; prudent men have not yet thought proper to pronounce judgment.—But it may be new to you to learn that while...
We received your favor of the [22] Instant and am obliged to you not only for your Acceptance of a very troublesome Challenge, but for the Alacrity with which you meet us in the field. We wish it would Afford you as many Laurels, as you are like to reap elsewhere! You have heard of the Enemy’s little Excursion to Peeks ⟨Kill⟩; we wish it may not encourage them, to make a more serious Attempt,...
Knowing that you find leasure amidst the bustle of politicks to amuse yourself with less important, but more pleasing studies, I have taken the liberty to send you the 3d Vol: of the proceedings of the society for agriculture & useful arts in this State. The first parts, I beleive I have had the honor to send you some years ago, if not, be so obliging as to let me know, & they shall be...
The furlough that you was so obliging as to give Mr Lewis Morris at my request being about to expire & the present prospects affording little probability so useful to the public in the field as in his present station I am induced to ask from your Excellency a continuance of it. The arrival of the fleet has set the invention of our politicians to work about the proper mode of employing it among...
I write in haste in hopes that this may overtake Mr. Lyle and correct an error in my last. Notwithstanding the appointment of Genl Victor & several other officers for Louisiana, among others a Compt[r]oller of the forests, no Prefet is yet appointed—nor is the difference relative to the Floridas settled. Spain insists that they are not ceded and I have certain information that two days ago the...
I take the Liberty to enclose a letter to Genl. Armstrong, containing letters to my sister, & my children, which I pray you to have the goodness to forward. My extreme anxiety to let my Children hear from me, & to have them home again, must be my appology for the trouble I give you since I find that none of my letters by the Ossage reached their destination, except that which you had the...
Copy: National Archives It is with peculiar pleasure that I obey the directions of Congress in making Communications, which shew their Sense of the Exertions of their Ally, & the merit of the Officers She Employs. The Confidence inspired by the first, & the Esteem Excited by the last, form new bonds of Union between Nations whom reciprocal Interests had before Connected. In this View I flatter...
I received on the fifth Inst your favor of the ⟨2⟩;8th. Septr. I began immediately to unpack my papers and have been since employed in examining them, this took ⟨s⟩;ome time, as they were all unsorted & put into a trunk for the convenience of transportation. I can find none of the papers you refer to. It was my practice in all ship cases t⟨o⟩; put the papers into the hands of Mr. Skipwith for...
I am sorrey for the occasion which induces me to renew a correspondence, which my fear of trespassing upon your Excellencys time led me to forego, notwithstanding the pleasure it afforded me. I shall now only intrude so far upon your Leisure as to submit a single Idea to your Excellencys consideration, which may possibly be of use in our present critical situation. I greatly fear that our...
I yesterday made several propositions to the Minister on the subject of Louisiana. He told me frankly that every offer was premature, that the French Government had determined to take possession first—so that you must consider the business as absolutely determined on. The armament is what I have already mentioned and will be ready in about six weeks. I have every reason to believe the Floridas...
My Brother is this moment departing for Philadelphia and has requested a letter of introduction to you. I find a pleasure in complying with his request not only on his account, but because it affords me an opportunity of intimating that I am not ignorant of, or ungratful for, your late acts of friendship & of assuring you of the sincere esteem & respect with which Dr Sir I have the honor to be...
December 25, 1785. “I recd your notes with Mr. Hoffmans Letter. I have no objections to waving any formalities with respect to the return of the writ of error. I should be extremly sorry if any part of my letter strikes you disagreeably. The passage you allude to was inserted as well to contradict an assertion that I had treated Mr. Hoffmans memory with severity, as to express my resentment at...
Next to the pleasure of paying my respects to the President, & seeing my friends, my object in Visiting this place was to receive your instructions, & any information you may think it proper to afford me on the subject of my mission, as well as to assertain the time & manner of my departure, that I may make my domestic arrangments accord with them. I will do myself the honor to wait upon you...
I feel myself extremely obliged by your favor of Sepr. not only on account of the friendly wishes it contains but because of the elucidation that it affords to your former communications on that very interesting subject the rights of commerce. Your arguments leave no doubt of the principles you endeavour to establish, it is however much to be lamented that the favourable moment for...
After my return home I made search among my papers for the catalogue of Pougens that you expressed a wish to have, & I was so fortunate as to find it. I send it with this. I mentioned to Mr Madison, in some of my letters, that there was a ballance in the hands of the bankers on the book account, which stood to my credit. I find by looking over their letters, that this ballance is fr. 1236.7....
I do myself the honor to transmit the enclosed letter which came under my cover from the Marquis de Lafayette. This to me contains nothing of consequence but what I presume he has given to you, nor is there much intelligence circulating in this place that merrits your attention. Cornwallis was recd in England with the strongest marks of applause, as he past thro’ Exeter he was presented with...
I have just recd the enclosed from Mr Pinkney with directions to forward them to you after having read them, which I have but just had the leisure to do as the gent who is to carry them sets off directly. They contain the only direct intelligence on the subject of our affairs in Spain that I have recd. Mr. Pinkneys letters to me having never reached me. Tho the conveyance by which you will...
In addition to my last (duplicates enclosed) I have obtained accurate information of the offer to Spain. It is either to sell them Parma for 48 millions of Livres or to exchange it for Florida. You see by this the value they put on Florida. I fear Spain will accede to their proposition. Lord Witworth is arrived. The affairs of Switzerland are in a train to be settled as France thinks proper...
After closing my packet I recd the note of which the within is a copy. It amounts to nothing, but it must serve to keep me quiet a few days longer—till they see what turn the business takes at Amiens which becomes more & more doubtful. The bad news from St Domingo also renders it necessary to keep us in suspence. I have already expressed my fear that American property in the Islands will not...