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At a meeting of the agents appointed by the state of New York to manage their controversy with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts —it is agreed that a general retaining fee be given to Alexander Hamilton and Samuel Jones Esqrs. as Counsellors and Solicitors on the part of this State that the brief already prepared together with the necessary papers be put in their hands—That they compleat the...
I have little to add to the letter of which I Send duplicates the absence of the First Consul & Minister, has Suspended all business, & I availed myself of the circumstance to make a tour in France, not chusing to go to England least any thing Should turn up that would require my attention, & particularly the return of the ratification which we are impatiently looking for. The decree of which...
3II. Recipient’s Copy (Jefferson Papers)
I have delayed answering your friendly letter by madame Brogniard in the hope of having some thing important to communicate but in the mean time have been so full in my letters to the secretary of State that I have left myself little to say on the subject of our publick affairs. I can only tell you generally that I have been gaining ground for some time past & some propositions I had an...
I have just now heard of an opportunity from Havre. I am doubtful whether my letter will arrive in time for it. I therefore confine myself to inform you that Genl Bernadotte is named Minister to the United States in the place of Otto who will be employed here. Genl Bernadotte is brother in law to joseph Bonaparte & is a very respectable man & has the character of a decided Republican. I have...
I have received quadruplicates and Triplicates of your favor of the 6th October; the First & Second not having yet reached me previous to the receipt of that letter, I had receivd two from Mr Pichon, covering letters to the Minister for Exterior Relations. In one of those he explains only Shortly the nature of his communications to the Minister: This was the first intimation that I had...
My anxiety for the supplies of the army have brought me to this place in order that I might satisfy myself as to the quantity on hand, & the means of forwarding them—Genl Nox has communicated to me your Excellencys orders on this subject—Nothing short of this would I am fully persuaded be of sufficient force to produce the desired effect—And knowledge of them will in a great measure render the...
The scene of Action is so entirely transfered to your side of the Atlantick that scarce any occurance among us at present is sufficiently interesting to furnish matter for a publick Letter. The Resolutions which have from time to time evinced the steady Determination of Congress in no event to Relinquish the great Object of the War or to think of Peace but in Connection with their Allies have...
Not knowing where to direct the enclosed I submit to your care. The bearer of this to Nantes waits so that I can write you nothing but that the Loussiana [ sic ] armament is still ice bound. The floridas not yet ceded owing I believe to some difficulty about parma & the solicitude of the Emperor of Russia to provide for the King of Sardinia. Spain is however prepared to make the cession & I...
Two LS : University of Pennsylvania Library; AL (draft): New-York Historical Society; copy and transcript: National Archives Since my last of which I send a duplicate by this Conveyance nothing material has happened here, unless it be the evacuation of Wilmington, which is perhaps the most important Post of Communication with the disaffected People of the Country of any they held in America—...
“The fact of the fall of stones from the sky, having been put, by some late inquiries almost beyond a doubt the philosophers are now disputing whether they are generated in the atmosphere or whether we owe them to volcanic eruptions in the moon, as much remains to be said on both sides; prudent men have not yet thought proper to pronounce judgment.—But it may be new to you to learn that while...
Knowing the value of your time I should not thus early after the receipt of yours have intruded upon it could I have consented that you should one moment longer misapprehend my sentiments with respect to your invaluable report on weights and measures. I am so far from suggesting any other ideas than those you propose that tho I have examined them with minute attention I find nothing to alter...
Two LS and L : University of Pennsylvania Library; transcript: National Archives Congress a few days since passed the enclosed Resolution No. 1. by which they have added Mr Jefferson to the Commission for concluding a peace; the established character of this Gentleman gives me reason to hope, that his appointment will be very acceptable to you, and the other Gentlemen in the Commission, I have...
I have written to you by the way of havre & by that conveyance you will receive packets &c. but as I would wish to omit no opportunit[y] I send this to L’Orient from whence I am told that a vessel is about to sail for Norfolk. You will find by the notes I sent you at different times that the administration here preserve the most absolute silence as to every point on which I press them & I am...
Knowing your engagements during the session of Congress, I have not thought it proper to break in upon your time by an earlier answer to your favor of the 28 Janry. The enclosed note you will have the goodness to read, & deliver to the auditor, as it contains the only explanation I can at present give to his inquiries. I sincerely congratulate you upon the total defeat of Mr. Burrs plans, for...
LS : University of Pennsylvania Library; AL (draft): New-York Historical Society; transcript: National Archives We have yet had no information from you subsequent to the signature of the Preliminary Articles by France, Spain and Britain, tho’ we have seen a declaration for the cessation of Hostilities signed by you, Mr. Adams, and Mr Jay— We grow every day more anxious for the definitive...
We received your favor of the [22] Instant and am obliged to you not only for your Acceptance of a very troublesome Challenge, but for the Alacrity with which you meet us in the field. We wish it would Afford you as many Laurels, as you are like to reap elsewhere! You have heard of the Enemy’s little Excursion to Peeks ⟨Kill⟩; we wish it may not encourage them, to make a more serious Attempt,...
Nothing extraordinary has occurred Since my last, a duplicate of which you will receive with this, as I find Some errors in the copy Sent you; if you have received it, be pleased to correct it by the duplicate: I had Strong hopes while in England that a change of Ministry would take place, in which case we Should doubtless have had peace; at present, Mr Pitt appears to be able to Stand his...
Knowing that you find leasure amidst the bustle of politicks to amuse yourself with less important, but more pleasing studies, I have taken the liberty to send you the 3d Vol: of the proceedings of the society for agriculture & useful arts in this State. The first parts, I beleive I have had the honor to send you some years ago, if not, be so obliging as to let me know, & they shall be...
AL (draft): New-York Historical Society; copy and transcript: National Archives An express just going to Chesapeake gives me an opportunity of sending by the Hermione a resolution passed Yesterday, my Letters by this conveyance are so lengthy that they leave me nothing to add unless it be that we have just received Letters from Mr. Deane (copies are inclosed) which confirm the authenticity of...
It is with equal Surprize and concern that I find not the least attention paid to the several Letters I have written you since I have had the honor to be in Office. I attributed this to their not having reached you, till I saw an extract of a letter which I had written to Mr Dumas, and which went by the Same conveyance with one to you published in the Courier de l’Europe, from which...
Having lately received some Leiden papers the perusal of which (tho’ of an old date) the Marquiss De la Fayette assured me would be agreeable to your Excellency I do myself the honour to enclose them, & at the same time to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 12th March—The papers contain little interesting intelligence but what we have already had—they are chiefly filled with American...
The furlough that you was so obliging as to give Mr Lewis Morris at my request being about to expire & the present prospects affording little probability so useful to the public in the field as in his present station I am induced to ask from your Excellency a continuance of it. The arrival of the fleet has set the invention of our politicians to work about the proper mode of employing it among...
After writing mine of this date I called on the Minister & Insisted on Some positive answer to my notes, he told me that he was expressly instructed by the first Consul to give me the most positive assurances that the Treaties we had entered into with Spain, or them relative to Louisiana Should be Strictly observed, when I expressed my Surprise that their officers should not be informed on...
I write in haste in hopes that this may overtake Mr. Lyle and correct an error in my last. Notwithstanding the appointment of Genl Victor & several other officers for Louisiana, among others a Compt[r]oller of the forests, no Prefet is yet appointed—nor is the difference relative to the Floridas settled. Spain insists that they are not ceded and I have certain information that two days ago the...
I have only to add to my last that as I conjectured the Consul has rejected the continuance of his term for ten yrs Upon the ground of his having recd his office from the people they only can add to it. The Council of State have in consequence referred it to the people to determine not whether he shall be consul for ten years but for life. This business creates not the least sensation here Nor...
I take the Liberty to enclose a letter to Genl. Armstrong, containing letters to my sister, & my children, which I pray you to have the goodness to forward. My extreme anxiety to let my Children hear from me, & to have them home again, must be my appology for the trouble I give you since I find that none of my letters by the Ossage reached their destination, except that which you had the...
Nothing very important relative to our affairs having intervened for Some time past I have not thought necessary to trouble you. The affair of our debts Stand exactly as they did upon vague promises on the part of the Minister which I have little expectation of Seeing Soon fulfilled & indeed Some confidential people have taken occasion to Say in Such a way as they know I Should hear that they...
I have just come from the Minister of the Treasury our conversation was So important that I think it necessary to write it while the impressions are Strong upon my mind, & the rather as I fear that I Shall not have time to copy & Send this letter if I differ [ sic ] it till morning. By my letter of yesterday you learned that the Minister had asked me on the 11th whether I would agree to...
Copy: National Archives It is with peculiar pleasure that I obey the directions of Congress in making Communications, which shew their Sense of the Exertions of their Ally, & the merit of the Officers She Employs. The Confidence inspired by the first, & the Esteem Excited by the last, form new bonds of Union between Nations whom reciprocal Interests had before Connected. In this View I flatter...
I received on the fifth Inst your favor of the ⟨2⟩;8th. Septr. I began immediately to unpack my papers and have been since employed in examining them, this took ⟨s⟩;ome time, as they were all unsorted & put into a trunk for the convenience of transportation. I can find none of the papers you refer to. It was my practice in all ship cases t⟨o⟩; put the papers into the hands of Mr. Skipwith for...
I am sorrey for the occasion which induces me to renew a correspondence, which my fear of trespassing upon your Excellencys time led me to forego, notwithstanding the pleasure it afforded me. I shall now only intrude so far upon your Leisure as to submit a single Idea to your Excellencys consideration, which may possibly be of use in our present critical situation. I greatly fear that our...
I yesterday made several propositions to the Minister on the subject of Louisiana. He told me frankly that every offer was premature, that the French Government had determined to take possession first—so that you must consider the business as absolutely determined on. The armament is what I have already mentioned and will be ready in about six weeks. I have every reason to believe the Floridas...
AL (draft): New-York Historical Society; copy and transcript: National Archives We have been extreamly alarmed at some communications which the Minister of france made me from his Last Letters— They look extreamly as if the Ct. De Vergennes imagined that neither Spain or Holland were anxious for our success— They discourage the Idea of a loan— from them or even from France. Our Letters from...
The inclosed notes will Shew that the arreté mentioned in mine of June last, continues to operate as I had expected. We have three vessels now here that are neither Suffered to unload or depart. Sweden & Denmark have a dozen in Similar circumstances. The absence of the Minister having prevented my receiving any answer to my notes, I wrote the enclosed letter to the Consul Cambacerès who...
My Brother is this moment departing for Philadelphia and has requested a letter of introduction to you. I find a pleasure in complying with his request not only on his account, but because it affords me an opportunity of intimating that I am not ignorant of, or ungratful for, your late acts of friendship & of assuring you of the sincere esteem & respect with which Dr Sir I have the honor to be...
December 25, 1785. “I recd your notes with Mr. Hoffmans Letter. I have no objections to waving any formalities with respect to the return of the writ of error. I should be extremly sorry if any part of my letter strikes you disagreeably. The passage you allude to was inserted as well to contradict an assertion that I had treated Mr. Hoffmans memory with severity, as to express my resentment at...
Next to the pleasure of paying my respects to the President, & seeing my friends, my object in Visiting this place was to receive your instructions, & any information you may think it proper to afford me on the subject of my mission, as well as to assertain the time & manner of my departure, that I may make my domestic arrangments accord with them. I will do myself the honor to wait upon you...
I told you in my last that a coolness Subsisted between the First Consul & Count Marcoff the Minister of Russia, But that it was rather a personal dislike than any thing that led immediately to a rupture between the two Courts. [Mar]cof has never much liked the present order of things and has sometimes too freely spoken his opinion of them in this country it is difficult to say anything which...
I feel myself extremely obliged by your favor of Sepr. not only on account of the friendly wishes it contains but because of the elucidation that it affords to your former communications on that very interesting subject the rights of commerce. Your arguments leave no doubt of the principles you endeavour to establish, it is however much to be lamented that the favourable moment for...
Enclosed is the answer of the Spanish ambassadour to my letter a copy of which was forwarded on the 28 ult. It accords with the conclusions I drew from the delay of the expedition & the conduct of the Minister for exterior relations. I have had a conversation with Collot & Adet separatly I find that tho they both consider their going in official characters to Louisiania as settled yet that...
After my return home I made search among my papers for the catalogue of Pougens that you expressed a wish to have, & I was so fortunate as to find it. I send it with this. I mentioned to Mr Madison, in some of my letters, that there was a ballance in the hands of the bankers on the book account, which stood to my credit. I find by looking over their letters, that this ballance is fr. 1236.7....
I do myself the honor to transmit the enclosed letter which came under my cover from the Marquis de Lafayette. This to me contains nothing of consequence but what I presume he has given to you, nor is there much intelligence circulating in this place that merrits your attention. Cornwallis was recd in England with the strongest marks of applause, as he past thro’ Exeter he was presented with...
I was yesterday honoured with your favours of the 22d instant, I have not seen the express that brought them, & know not whether he is yet returned, I shall commit this to the care of Genl Lincoln to see it safely forwarded. The British are at length sufficiently humbled to sue for peace tho not in the line we wish they seem to part with every thing more readily than with America. They have...
I sent my letters to the secretary some days ago by the way of Havre. I am in hopes that the ship that takes them may not yet have sailed. as I wish to congratulate you on your being elected a member of the national institute tho not without opposition. Ct Rumfort who has just left this was warmly supported. It gives me pleasure to find the number of friends that you have among the literary &...
I have nothing to add to the letters just sent you by the way of Baltimore but the enclosed note just recieved —from this you will find that the construction given to the second article of the convention differs materially from ours & will if supported greatly narrow the ground of our claims. You will also see in it rather an evasion of the points I have pressed them upon than an answer to...
The Washington Packet arrived this morning, I have not yet had leisure to read all my Letters, but as an Express is ready to go early to Morrow, I rather chuse to rely upon your goodness to excuse a letter written in extreme haste; than to hold myself inexcusable, by not informing you of what we yet know of the State of our Negotiations, none of my Letters are of a latter date than the 24th...
I have been honoured by yours of the Novr. I am pleased to find that you are Satisfied with my applications to the Government on the Subject of the debt, I am only Sorry that those applications have hitherto been unsuccessful & as far as appears will continue to be unless Some motive more efficacious than that of justice or national faith or credit is held out. To enter into the financial...
I have just recd the enclosed from Mr Pinkney with directions to forward them to you after having read them, which I have but just had the leisure to do as the gent who is to carry them sets off directly. They contain the only direct intelligence on the subject of our affairs in Spain that I have recd. Mr. Pinkneys letters to me having never reached me. Tho the conveyance by which you will...
I left Paris the 12th of last month upon a visit to England & returned on the 15th of this; I chose this time to avail myself of the President’s permission long Since obtained, not only for the reasons mentioned in my former letters, but because I knew that the whole attention of the Ministers being engrossed by the new arrangement[s] that were making no business of any Sort could be done; I...
LS and L : University of Pennsylvania Library; AL (draft): New-York Historical Society; copy and transcipt transcript : National Archives I have nothing to add to mine of the 5th instant, but to congratulate you on the safe arrival of two Vessels from Holland, having on board the goods left by Commodore Gillon, & to present you in the name of Mr Paine with three copies of a late work of his,...