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    • Livingston, Robert R.
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Livingston, Robert R." AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
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I have the honor to transmit a resolution of Congress, appointing you one of their Ministers Plenipotentiary for negociating a peace. I rejoice in this fresh proof of their confidence in your Virtue and abilities. The sacrifices you have heretofore made to the interests of your Country, induce me to hope that you will suffer no personal consideration to prevent their being employed in its...
I have delayed answering your favor of the 7th Instant until I could obtain the sense of Congress on the matter it contains. I conceive it hardly possible while the british Cruizers retain their present Station for you to elude their vigilance in either of the Ships offered to your choice. This concurring with the late advices from England, has induced Congress to pass the enclosed Resolution....
I was yesterday honoured with your favor of the 14th which I shall lay before Congress this morning. As you have by this time received their resolution, which I had the honor to send you by the last Post, and again enclosed, you will be releived in some measure from your embarrassments, tho’ not entirely from your suspence with respect to their final determination. But that cannot be long...
I have the honor to inform you by the direction of Congress in answer to your Letter of the 13th. March “that they consider the object of your appointment as so far advanced, as to render it unnecessary for you to pursue your Voyage; And that Congress are well satisfied with the readiness you have shewn in undertaking a Service which from the present situation of Affairs they apprehend can be...
New York, 3 Mch. 1788 . Introducing Mr. Adrian Kissam “a young gentleman of the profession of the law” who has very respectable connections. RC ( NNP ); 2 p.; endorsed.
Having flattered myself that I had fallen upon a new meathod of diminishing the friction in heavy machines, I take the liberty to communicate it to you, and to beg that you would do me the favour to inform me if I have deceived myself, or made a useful discovery? Let the end of the spindle pass thro, and be strongly fixed to a peice of light wood whose solid contents should be two square feet...
The hope I entertained of meeting you at New York when I vissited it in Sepr. has induced me to delay answering your polite favor , disappointed in this hope, I cannot deny myself the pleasure of informing you that I have made some experiments which satisfy me that the friction on a spindle or gudgeons may, by the means I proposed, be reduced almost to nothing. As my trials were made with...
The enclosed was written long since and accidentaly detained at New York. I send it now to shew that I have not been inattentive to the letter you favoured me with and somewhat to shorten what I am now to tell you of the result of the experiment you encouraged me to make. In order to gain room for affixing the hollow cylinder or tub to the spindle of the mill it was necessary to make a new cog...
Knowing the value of your time I should not thus early after the receipt of yours have intruded upon it could I have consented that you should one moment longer misapprehend my sentiments with respect to your invaluable report on weights and measures. I am so far from suggesting any other ideas than those you propose that tho I have examined them with minute attention I find nothing to alter...
My Brother is this moment departing for Philadelphia and has requested a letter of introduction to you. I find a pleasure in complying with his request not only on his account, but because it affords me an opportunity of intimating that I am not ignorant of, or ungratful for, your late acts of friendship & of assuring you of the sincere esteem & respect with which Dr Sir I have the honor to be...
I find with great regret that a report which circulates here of your intention to resign your office gains credit. It appears to me that there are many motives as well of a public as of a private nature which should induce you to take this resolution with great deliberation. Your present station holds you up to the view of your country in the most conspicuous point of light. The attacks which...
Surrounded as you are at present by the mists of politicks, & those too of a nature to defuse, like other fogs, are obscurity & gloom upon every object, I flatter myself, that it will not be unpleasing to you, to let your eyes rest for a moment upon a spot irradiated by a slight glimmering of philosophy. I therefore take the liberty to communicate & to ask your sentiments on the subject of an...
Mr. Smith being just about to depart I have but a moments time to send you the proceedings of the Society for the promotion of Agriculture &c. in this State—In this you will find an important discovery of mine in the fabrication of paper from a very large species of conferva common in Hudsons river—I have proposed the experiment for many years back to the paper makers but could never get them...
I did not receive your favor of the 17th : Apl till on my Return to this place from New York, owing to its having gone on to my country residence while I was on my way down. I have also received the transactions of the Philosophical society with the model of your mould board. I have considered it with attention, & am satisfied that it is an important improvement, & the rather as it is...
Description of mercurial engine The figure represents an engine intended to work with very little friction. It must be observed that in order to simplify the drawg an ejection cock on the old principle is substituted for an air pump & condenser which however is to be preferred in practice—Nor can the enjection be made in the manner shewn in the drawing without a snifting valve for each side of...
Mr Van Benthuysens solicited that I should receive your favor of the 12th . by a safe conveyance, & some of his domestic arrangments prevented its reaching me till yesterday, just as I was preparing to answer your former letter which I delayed till I could with certainty offer you my congratulations on the happy effects of the republican exertion, & my wishes for your happiness for such a...
I recd your favor of the 16th. ult. just as I was leaving New York for this place which has delayed till now my acknowledging the distinguished attention you have shewn me in procuring for me the honor of a place among the American philosophers. The moment you chose for doing has not a little encreased the obligation, since it was one in which the whole American world (except the man who...
I have this moment only received your favor the 24 Feby. It lay some days in the post Office at New York, from whence it was sent to Clermont & at last followed me to Albany. I hasten to express my gratitude for your frequent attentions to me. I had determined to take upon me no new Office, but to endeavour to promote your interest, which I believed to be intimatly connected with that of my...
The delay that your favor of the 24th feby had met with induced me to write an hasty answer on the 12th. instant (the moment it came to hand) as the post was then going out. It appearing by the way bill that some free letters directed to Clermont had miscarried in their passage from New York least mine to you should have met the same fate I think it proper to repeat my grateful acknowledgments...
I not long since did myself the honor to inform you of the discovery of some bones near the surface of the earth in the Western parts of this State. of these I have as yet been able to obtain no description. by the polite attention however of Judge Williamson I have in my possession three very remarkable teeth which are evidently the dentis incisores of some enormous carnivourous animal. two...
I avail myself of Mr. DeLaBegarre’s going to Washington to send you the teeth found in the western part of this state, drawings of which, I had before done myself the honor to transmit to you. May they not have belonged to the hippopotamus? The front teeth of that animal in the lower jaw being described “as projecting, furrowed & pointed, & as formed rather to tear than cut.” Fab: Columna ....
The fear of intruding upon the few hours you can spare to rural occupations, & philosophic retirment has prevented my replying to your favor till your return to Washington, where I am told that this will find you. The character you give of Mr. Sumpter will doubtless render him an acquisition to the public, & in theory, the appointment of the secretary to the legation seems an adviseable...
My line of law reading has for twenty Years past been confined to civil cases arising in the Court of Chancery only. This must be my appology, if in replying to your questions I should be found in the wrong. In Answer to the first It is true that many of the whig Lawyers have been of opinion that truth cannot be a libel, & this was strenuously maintained by Lord Camden against Lord Mansfield ....
The Chancellor Livingston has read with great pleasure the observations of the president on neutral rights—Mr. Livingston is perfectly satisfied that they are founded in reason & justice, & should as such form the Law of nations, for nothing is more absurd than that the quarels of others shd affect the right of peaceable nations—The extention which their adoption would give to the commerce of...
Mr. Livingston has the honor to inform the president, that in his opinion the writers of the enclosed have no such political weight or information as should in any sort influence the presidents own sentiments on public measures. They are weak men who have in this instance been probably the dupes of some that are more artful . Mr. Livingston had the honor to state yesterday what he truly...
I some time since had the honor to write to you on the subject of some of the appointments in New York on which you had requested my opinion. I apprehended from what you then said, that Bailey had voluntarily withdrawn , which I now find is not the case but that he still retains some expectations of the office, & is supported in his pretentions by Armstrong. which renders what I now have to...
I am just favoured by your note without date covering two letters for Paris . I conclude from this circumstance that you have recd advices of the ratification of the treaty, & have determined upon my departure. but I have yet heard nothing on the subject from the Secretary of State. I presume however that the next post will bring me my commission & instructions, immediatly after which I will...
I feel myself extremely obliged by your favor of Sepr. not only on account of the friendly wishes it contains but because of the elucidation that it affords to your former communications on that very interesting subject the rights of commerce. Your arguments leave no doubt of the principles you endeavour to establish, it is however much to be lamented that the favourable moment for...
I sent my letters to the secretary some days ago by the way of Havre. I am in hopes that the ship that takes them may not yet have sailed. as I wish to congratulate you on your being elected a member of the national institute tho not without opposition. Ct Rumfort who has just left this was warmly supported. It gives me pleasure to find the number of friends that you have among the literary &...
I am sorry so soon after my arrival here to trouble you with any thing that relates personally to myself, & which I fear will be not less painful to you, than it has been to me. From Mr. Sumter’s first entrance into my family I have treated him with all the attention in my power, I have (as far as he would permit me) introduced him wherever I visited myself, & have extended indulgencies to him...