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    • Livingston, Robert R.
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Livingston, Robert R." AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Knowing that you find leasure amidst the bustle of politicks to amuse yourself with less important, but more pleasing studies, I have taken the liberty to send you the 3d Vol: of the proceedings of the society for agriculture & useful arts in this State. The first parts, I beleive I have had the honor to send you some years ago, if not, be so obliging as to let me know, & they shall be...
I feel myself extremely obliged by your favor of Sepr. not only on account of the friendly wishes it contains but because of the elucidation that it affords to your former communications on that very interesting subject the rights of commerce. Your arguments leave no doubt of the principles you endeavour to establish, it is however much to be lamented that the favourable moment for...
After my return home I made search among my papers for the catalogue of Pougens that you expressed a wish to have, & I was so fortunate as to find it. I send it with this. I mentioned to Mr Madison, in some of my letters, that there was a ballance in the hands of the bankers on the book account, which stood to my credit. I find by looking over their letters, that this ballance is fr. 1236.7....
The delay that your favor of the 24th feby had met with induced me to write an hasty answer on the 12th. instant (the moment it came to hand) as the post was then going out. It appearing by the way bill that some free letters directed to Clermont had miscarried in their passage from New York least mine to you should have met the same fate I think it proper to repeat my grateful acknowledgments...
Not knowing whether an agricultural Society is still in existence in Pennsylvania, I have chosen to adress this to you to whose Institution no useful discovery is foreign— I had heard here that the ashes of Pyrites were used as a manure, but I could meet with no satisfactory information on the subject till in a little excursion that I made lately into Flanders I was enabled to see the process...
Having very latly writen to you this is merely to inform you that our mutual friend Mr. Skipwith being now the father of a family is desirous of removing to Louisiana. His knowledge of the french language the religion of his family & his amiable manner fit him in a peculiar manner for conciliating the affections of the people of that country to our government, and should you distribute that...
I have this moment only received your favor the 24 Feby. It lay some days in the post Office at New York, from whence it was sent to Clermont & at last followed me to Albany. I hasten to express my gratitude for your frequent attentions to me. I had determined to take upon me no new Office, but to endeavour to promote your interest, which I believed to be intimatly connected with that of my...
I avail myself of Mr. DeLaBegarre’s going to Washington to send you the teeth found in the western part of this state, drawings of which, I had before done myself the honor to transmit to you. May they not have belonged to the hippopotamus? The front teeth of that animal in the lower jaw being described “as projecting, furrowed & pointed, & as formed rather to tear than cut.” Fab: Columna ....
The Chancellor Livingston has read with great pleasure the observations of the president on neutral rights—Mr. Livingston is perfectly satisfied that they are founded in reason & justice, & should as such form the Law of nations, for nothing is more absurd than that the quarels of others shd affect the right of peaceable nations—The extention which their adoption would give to the commerce of...
Mr. Livingston has the honor to inform the president, that in his opinion the writers of the enclosed have no such political weight or information as should in any sort influence the presidents own sentiments on public measures. They are weak men who have in this instance been probably the dupes of some that are more artful . Mr. Livingston had the honor to state yesterday what he truly...