You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Livingston, Robert R.
  • Recipient

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Livingston, Robert R." AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-10 of 29 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
1II. Recipient’s Copy (Jefferson Papers)
I have delayed answering your friendly letter by madame Brogniard in the hope of having some thing important to communicate but in the mean time have been so full in my letters to the secretary of State that I have left myself little to say on the subject of our publick affairs. I can only tell you generally that I have been gaining ground for some time past & some propositions I had an...
Knowing that you find leasure amidst the bustle of politicks to amuse yourself with less important, but more pleasing studies, I have taken the liberty to send you the 3d Vol: of the proceedings of the society for agriculture & useful arts in this State. The first parts, I beleive I have had the honor to send you some years ago, if not, be so obliging as to let me know, & they shall be...
I feel myself extremely obliged by your favor of Sepr. not only on account of the friendly wishes it contains but because of the elucidation that it affords to your former communications on that very interesting subject the rights of commerce. Your arguments leave no doubt of the principles you endeavour to establish, it is however much to be lamented that the favourable moment for...
After my return home I made search among my papers for the catalogue of Pougens that you expressed a wish to have, & I was so fortunate as to find it. I send it with this. I mentioned to Mr Madison, in some of my letters, that there was a ballance in the hands of the bankers on the book account, which stood to my credit. I find by looking over their letters, that this ballance is fr. 1236.7....
I sent my letters to the secretary some days ago by the way of Havre. I am in hopes that the ship that takes them may not yet have sailed. as I wish to congratulate you on your being elected a member of the national institute tho not without opposition. Ct Rumfort who has just left this was warmly supported. It gives me pleasure to find the number of friends that you have among the literary &...
You will receive by this conveyance the ratification of our treaties. I shall feel some anxiety considering how much we have taken upon ourselves beyond our powers to learn that this transaction meets your approbation. Here every body is loud in its commendation & we are supposed to have made a more important acquisition for our country than the purchase of Germany would be for france. Since...
Having just heard of a vessel going from Havre I give you this hasty letter merely to inform you that it is now understood that war is inevitable & that within a few days. Yesterday I presented Mr. Monroe to the first consul at his levee where he publicly declared that the terms demanded by Britain were totally inadmissable. Lord Wetworth did not attend the Levee & this day has asked his...
I am just favoured by your note without date covering two letters for Paris . I conclude from this circumstance that you have recd advices of the ratification of the treaty, & have determined upon my departure. but I have yet heard nothing on the subject from the Secretary of State. I presume however that the next post will bring me my commission & instructions, immediatly after which I will...
The enclosed packet marked No 1, was written at the time it is dated—The subject of it is very painful to me, & I have retained it for the reasons mentioned in the enclosed letters No. 1 & 2—by which I trust it will appear how much I sacrificed both of my rights, & my feelings, to prevent this matter from causing you, or the connections of Mr. Sumter any uneasiness—I continued to act with Mr....
The delay that your favor of the 24th feby had met with induced me to write an hasty answer on the 12th. instant (the moment it came to hand) as the post was then going out. It appearing by the way bill that some free letters directed to Clermont had miscarried in their passage from New York least mine to you should have met the same fate I think it proper to repeat my grateful acknowledgments...