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Resolved, that the Hon. John Hancock Hon. Thomas Cushing Esquires Mr. Samuel Adams, John Adams, and Robert Treat Pain Esquires appointed by the last provincial Congress “to represent this Colony on the 10th of May next or sooner if necessary, at the American Congress, to be held at Philadelphia” be and they hereby are, authorized and impowered “with the Delegates from the other American...
Mrs. Adams mentioned to me last evening that you wanted to know the state of our forts, the number of men we have to support the lines and the number of cannon in the town and vicinity of Boston. She desired I would write upon those matters. We have on Fort Hill in Boston a square fort about an hundred feet Curtin with four Bastions, a good ditch with pickets therein; a small fort at...
Congress, a few days since, received your letter of the 19 of April last which announced to them that you had been received by the States General of the United provinces in the quality of Minister plenipotentiary of the United States of America—an event interesting and important—besides a participation in the general joy occasioned hereby my private feelings are perfectly gratified that...
When at the close of the war I left public life I had not the least idea of ever returning to it again—I then supposed that by the exercise of industry & œconomy (in the habits of them I was early educated) in private pursuits I should be able to give bread to my family in the evening of life, but painful to relate, things are much changed from causes over which I had no controul. From the...
At my last interview I mentioned to your Excellency my apprehensions that there were some influential characters in the United States, who, if a change of the Constitution could not be effected in the first instance would endeavour to destroy the influence of the new government and make it subsurvient to the views of the different States. I see no reason since to change my opinion but am...
I have just been honored by the receipt of your favor of the 8th. instant—I have not time, as I must soon leave town to observe now on that part of it which is in answer to a sentiment of mind on which we seem I am to differ. There is no proposition, to which I can more fully accede than to the one which affirms how important it is to people that the President, the vice President, the Senate...
I am fully in sentiment with you respecting the danger of an established aristocracy and had I fully explained my self when I mentioned the subject in my letter of the 22 Ulto. there would not I suppose have been even a "seeming" difference in opinion thereon. The words slavery and aristocracy have been used here for political purposes as synonymous—They have been equally terrifying to many of...
I had the pleasure a few days since of receiving your kind favor of the 19th. ulto— When I first saw the new constitution I was very apprehensive that the President would not be able to maintain his ground and preserve such a stand, on the stage of our political theatre, as to keep up that equilibram essential to our enjoying all those blessings which are derived from a constitution in which...
As I have not taken any steps respecting my return to public life to which you are a stranger and have no measures to pursue to which I would have you ignorant I have as a gratification of my own feelings given you a Copy of my letter this day to the President. From it you will learn the reasons which have induced the measures— "When I had the honor of addressing your Excellency on the subject...
Mr Frobisher early exerted himself in this Commonwealth to discover the best mode of making pot ashes and I am fully in opinion that we are indebted to him for those exertions and for the improvments he has made on the original practice—He has often attempted a compensation from this state and has as often failed of success—He wishes now to submit his system to the consideration of Congress...
As it is within your province to appoint printers in whose papers the public acts of the United States are to be published And as I have been informed that Mr. Benjamin Russell printer of the Massachusetts Centinal has been recommended to you as a suitable person to be employed as the publisher for the Northern States; I sincerely wish him success and beg leave to say that you may perfectly...
Your ideas of Frobisher are the same with ours here We shall I think hear little more from him.— I have the pleasure to inclose Dr. Tufts order on you—You will forward me a draught for it when it shall be most convenient for you—If you should not by the next post you will be so good as to acknowledge the receipt of it.— Our General Court is now together it is said of them it as is Generally...
The exertions of disappointment & of antifederalism have had little effect I congratulate you My dear sir most sincerely on the happy event— When you left us no arrangment was made for the return of the few dollars you received of me—As I do not know what would be most convenient for you whether to forward the money or for me to draw on you I take the liberty to say now that when ever it shall...
Before this can reach you, you will be informed that our attempts to establish a peace with the hostiles tribes of Indians North of the Ohio has been ineffectual; and lest you should be perplexed with vague and uncertain accounts of the state of the business I have now taken up my pen to give you a short detail of the matter.— On my arrival at Niagra the 25th. of May I was informed by the...
I return your letters with my most cordial thanks for the sight of them—In the perusal I have been highly gratified and informed and have been confirmed in the idea that if our Jacobins intend to sap the foundation of our present constitution and thereby bring on a serious contest now is the momint for them to attempt their mad pursuit while the powers of Europe have full employ at home and...
The inclosed will be presented to you by a committee from a number of Citizens on Monday next at half fast ten oClock should you at that time be at Quincy and in a situation to receive them—Our mutual friend Mr. Jonathan Jackson is with me & proposes to return here to meet our brethren Vzt. Colo: Daws Dr. Mason Mr Higginson Judge Wendal J Jackson B Lincoln With sincere wishes for your...
The enclosed address stands as first written. When you shall have both before you you will greatly oblige the Committee by selecting which shall the most fully comport with your own feelings.—The alterations between the Copy I left on Saturday and the address delivered on monday were the result of ideas highly respectful; which I will more fully explain when I shall call on monday next in the...
When Mr. Shaw was the other day at my office he mentioned to Mr. Weld my assistant that he had been informed that my drafts had been refused at every bank in this town. I have not, nor have I had a right to draw, nor have I drawn, on any bank but that of the branch where as Collecter I lodge the public monies and draw them as the public service and my duty requires.— My having, with General...
The Revd. Mr. Evens call to tender his services as a Chaplain to the troops now raising—In that Character he passed thro our long Contest with Great Britain to great acceptance. He joined my family during the seige of York town I not only became atteached to him as a friend, but as a Gentleman well qualified & disposed to discharge with fidelity the duties of his station. I think him now...
Monies recd. by the President of the U. S. from Benjn. Lincoln Collector at Boston. 1799 April 12. P. recd of this date—being the amt. due to Presdt. for his compensation to 4 Mar: 1799 Ds. 6,000 June 5. P. recd. of this date 2,000 Augt. 23. P. ditto—Co 2000 Sept: 25. P. ditto—Co 2000 30.
The late collector of Portsmouth Mr. Whipple has often spoken and written to me respecting his removal from Office and wished me to converse with you on the subject which I declined being persuaded of the impropriety of the measure without evidence to substantiate the facts he set up. But at last upon his admitting the Justice of his removal upon the proof adduced in the case and giving up all...
The same reasons which prevented my having the honour of dining with you yesterday now exist, and deny me the pleasure of doing it to day—From the confidence I have that your wishes are that every officer should be at his post, when his duties as such manifestly require it I persuade my self that you will not charge me with with neglect in these instances.— Believe me my dear sir in /...
Major Hatch has shewn to me the draft of a system he has formed for discharging a number of Cannon at the same instant and proposed so to connect the balls by chains and sharpened Knives so as to cutt their way thro every body which shall come in contact with them.—I have not any pretentions to that kind of science on which their operation must be founded. I therefore hope that my silence...
The extreme bad traveling for some time past has prevented my calling and paying to you the debt of my most dutiful Gratitude While I sympathise with my country in the loss which they have sustained by the events of the late election it is some consolation that you will suffer less by the change than any other of your fellow citizens in the Union. Some few of them may be ingrateful for your...
At our last interview you expressed a wish that I would make such remarks on the impost laws as in my opinion would have a tendency to increase the revenue in a way as little burdensome and as conformable to the wishes of the people as possible. The cheerfulness discovered by the merchants in general doing business at this Port in paying the established duties on merchandise evinces to me that...
Boston, December 1, 1789. “I have been honoured with the receipt of your favor of the 20th Ulto.… The plan which you have adopted of receiving the bills of the Bank aforesaid, is, in my opinion judicious & important as it relates to all the ports saving those in the county of Lincoln as it will accomodate the people, and have a tendency to leave the circulating cash so dispursed as best to...
Boston, December 9, 1789. “Some of the merchants are in opinion that some allowance, in weighing should be made in weighing sugars as they are daily lightning, we have not made any. Ought we to do it? We had a few days since a quantity of wine entered from some port in France it is now represented as being bad & not worth the duties. There are other wines represented as similar. What, if any...
[ Boston, December 16, 1789. On January 19, 1790, Hamilton wrote to Lincoln : “I am favored with your letter of the 16th. of last month.” Letter not found. ]
On my return from Georgia I met on file in our office your questions concerning the navigations of the several States and foreign nations. An answer to those questions has been delayed from various causes. No one however has contributed more to produce it than a want of information in me, respecting some of them at the time I first saw them. I have since had an opportunity of knowing many...
Boston, December 26, 1789. “… your Circular letter of the 18th. just came to hand and I am happy to inform you that I have anticipated your orders and early adopted that line of conduct which I thought would secure that punctuality in the payment of bonds.… I have the pleasure now to inform you that we have not … had any person a delinquent for a moment.…” ADf , Collector of Customs at Boston,...
[ Boston, 1789. ] Discusses the difficulty of distinguishing between goods on which duties have been paid and those on which they have not been paid. Proposes a system of branding casks, chests, and boxes, and marking bales to prevent smuggling. LC , RG 36, Letters from the Treasury and Others, 1789–1818, Vol. 11, National Archives.
Boston, January 20, 1790. Discusses the type of boat that should be used to prevent smuggling. States that “As all drawbacks on goods … & bounties paid on articles exported too often operate as Caches on the revenue of a country the greatest barriers possible should be placed around it to prevent the practice of frauds of every kind.” ADf , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from...
Boston, January 26, 1790. Discusses the problems involved in the re-exportation of imported wines. Suggests placing imported raisins, lemons, pepper, and pimento on the enumerated list, and states that the additional levies would produce a “handsome” sum. ADf , RG 36, Letters from the Treasury and Others, 1789–1818, Vol. 11, National Archives.
[ Boston ] January 27, 1790 . “Your faver of the 20th respecting Christopher Sadler is before us. In the morning of his arrival he came directly to the office with his papers in order to enter his vessel. His papers from Hallifax Nova Scotia were regular. He appeared to be very unhappy on his finding his mistake and applied for advice and has attended fully to the directions given him. No...
Agreeably to your directions I now Inclose the return of the fees of the several officers of the district of Boston and Charlestown together with an account of all the money paid to the weighers, gaugers, which was received by them respectively from the 10th. of August to the end of December last. At one view you will see what ⅌ Cent the collection in this district has cost. The emoluments of...
[Boston] February 7 [1790.] Acknowledges receipt of Hamilton’s “several favors of the 27th. 28 & 30th Ulto.” Explains why the collector at Biddeford has not received registry blanks. States that the “payment of the Invalids will be undertaken with pleasure.” ADf , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury and Others, 1789–1818, Vol. 11, National Archives. Letter of...
To reduce things involved in confusion, to a state of order, in all cases requires labour and attention. The task is increased by the magnitude of the object, and is rendered perplexing indeed, where there are a deficiency of means and where different interests ably supported, and stubbornly adhearred to, must be combined for the completion of the system in view. To devise a scheme, which...
Boston, March 19, 1790. “I have written to the several keepers of the light-houses in this State, excepting the keeper of the light house at Plymouth, informing them that the President of the United States has been pleased to continue them in their present appointments.… Mrs. Thomas the widow the late General Thomas, not Warren has been considered as the keeper of the light house at...
Boston, March 24, 1790. States that “General Warren is going in the Morning to the City of New York to settle his public accounts as a Member of the Navy board, in this State.” Recommends General Warren’s son, Henry, for “an office in the revenue.” Copy, RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury and Others, 1789–1818, Vol. 11, National Archives. James Warren of Plymouth,...
Boston, April 6, 1790. “I have just now had with me Mr. Thomas, son of the late General Thomas, whose Mother has the care of Light house at Plymouth. When she was first appointed to that trust he was a minor otherwise he probably would have had the appointment himself. He is a Young Gentleman of a good character and I think is a fair candidate for the appointment under the United States. I...
By the 27 Section of the Coasting act it is provided that all vessels therein described & under certain circumstances shall enter within 24 hours after arrival. As no penalty is annexed to a nonperformance of the injunction in the law little attention is now paid to it, & the attention is daily decreasing, indeed it seems to decrease with the knowledge that there is no forfiture on a breach of...
[ Boston, May 25, 1790. On June 8, 1790, Hamilton wrote to Lincoln : “I have received your favor of the 25th of May.” Letter not found. ]
Boston, May 27, 1790. “Your circular letter of the 17th. instant on the importance of your receiving the earliest information when breaches of the revenue law should take place came to hand by the tuesday post.… About five weeks since information was given that two trunks of merchandise had been in the night landed from on board the Ship Neptune Capt James Scott from London. On search the two...
Boston, June 1, 1790. “A district court for the Masst district was held here this day. The case of the Ship neptune the two trunks of Merchandize & of the Molasses and liam mentioned in my last have been called & are all gone by default.…” LC , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letter Book, 1790–1797, National Archives; copy, RG 56, Letters from the Collector at Boston, National Archives....
[ Boston, July 1, 1790. ] Recommends Barzillas Delano “as a suitable person” to be the keeper of the lighthouse at Portland Head. ALS , RG 26, Lighthouse Letters Received, Vol. “B,” New Hampshire and Massachusetts, National Archives.
Boston, July 1, 1790. States that the lighthouses on Thatcher Thacher and Plum Islands need to be repaired and that the cost of the work will be $137.83⅓. ALS , RG 26, Lighthouse Letters Received, Vol. “B,” New Hampshire and Massachusetts, National Archives; LC , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letter Book, 1790–1797, National Archives; copy, RG 56, Letters from the Collector at Boston,...
Boston, July 3, 1790. “Your favour of the 24th Ulto. came by the last post. I have seen one of the Gentlemen to whom was committed the building the light-house at Portland and find that the house is fifty eight feet in height that it must be raised Eight feet higher which will cost about one hundred dollars. The whole expence which has been incurred for the land the Light-house and for a...
The time will soon arrive when we may expect that large quantities of pickled & dryed fish will be imported here from Nova Scotia. Upon their arrival they are charged with a duty, on the pickled fish seventy five Cents ⅌ barrel & on the dryed fish fifty cents ⅌ Quintal. These fish are not consumed in the United States and are entitled to a draw back upon their being exported to a foreign...
I now take up my pen to give you an account of the seizure of the Schooner Bee of about 30 Tons from Nova-Scotia and to relate the circumstances which led to & have taken place in consequence thereof. On Wednesday last I had information that a Schooner of about Thirty five tons from Nova-Scotia had been for some days in the offing but had run in at night; that lighters had taken out of her a...
In my last I suggested my apprehensions that we should suffer by having thrown in upon us the fish from Nova Scotia. I am hourly more and more confirmed in the idea and that we shall pay the bounty on much more fish than we shall like. Our vessels are permitted to fish on the coast of Nova-Scotia and make the fish on shore. Many of them are in this practice and return in the fall with the...