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In all the events of my chequered life, I have ever considered you and Mrs Madison, my best & dearest friends, to whom I owed more than to all the world. Through good and through evil report, you were always the same and I therefore experience much delight in announcing to you both my marriage with Mrs Ann McLean, the widow of the late munificent John McLean, which took place on the 4th inst....
I have been favored by your letter of the 17th. I was induced to write you on the subject of M r Wiers cabinet, from what had occasionally fallen from him and D r Wallace in relation thereto. M r Wier purchased this collection in spain last year, expecting to sell it in the U. States to advantage, in which he has been disappointed and as he contemplates going to Europe, he would prefer selling...
Mr Edward Wyer, a friend of mine purchased in spain the last year, a cabinet of Conchyology and mineralogy, which is said by those who are good judges to be valuable—He wishes to dispose of this collection and thinking it might be wanted at your Institute, I have taken the liberty to mention it to you as I presume it can be had cheap. D r Wallace of Virginia is here & desires me to say that if...
Knowing how much you feel for the sufferings of Col o W m Duane I beg leave to lay before you a letter I have this moment received from him and at the same time to state that the place of naval officer at Philadelphia having become vacant M r Duanes friends procured one hundred and fifteen names of the most respectable merchants & others in Philadelphia recommending him to the place which I...
Mr Arganil a respectable French homme de Lettres residing in Newport R.I. is anxious to procure the situation of professor of the French, Spanish & Italian languages in one of our Colleges for which I believe him eminently qualified. Thinking it possible that such a person may be wanted in the institution patronized by you I take the liberty to inclose: for your perusal two or three of his...
I take the liberty of sending my account of articles forwarded to you from Bordeaux amounting to $425.3c. from which must be deducted a sum of money you paid to me in 1811 and which I had omitted to credit you with when I sent out from Paris the articles purchased for Mrs. Madison. I believe it was 300$ but as some of my papers have been mislaid I have not been able to come at the sum nor can...
I am sorry there has been a misunderstanding respecting M r Stewart — M r Keller thinks he cannot afford to keep him at two dollars per week as from the weakness of his constitution he will never be able to turn out much work the movement of the Loom fatigues him considerably. Besides every necessary of life has become so dear here that in boarding him for 2$ per week M Keller says he would be...
The young man in question arrived a few days ago and is now at work at the factory. M r Keller tells me he finds him very intelligent—He boards at the factory and M r Keller to whom I have abandoned it for the present wishes to fix the price s of his board and what he is to pay for learning the trade. I have put off the adjustment of these points until I know your ideas on the subject and I...
Permit me to recommend to Your kind civilities the bearer of this the Rev d C. Lowell of Boston a particular friend of mine of many years standing I shall be grateful for your goodness towards him RC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “ M r Jefferson ”; endorsed by TJ as received 27 Oct. 1817 and so recorded in SJL . Charles Lowell
Your favor of the 25th of last month was duly rec d and I should have replied to it before now but that a slight indisposition arising from the pain of a neglected dislocation prevented it— I have conversed with my principal Swiss who thinks that the young man you mention ought to pay his own board as he comes simply to learn the trade for his own benefit—our apprentices after the first year...
The little Swiss colony of Stocking weavers to which the letter you honored me with refers is composed of three heads of families their children and four workmen with twenty four choice Looms many of which are after the English model with the newest french improvements. I am half concerned in this factory the whole of which has cost me in the purchase of the Looms and the passage & sustenance...
Mr Capellano has decided to make you a visit at Montpellier in the course of the summer. He says he does not like to be hurried in a Work of this nature. In making you a visit he might extend his journey to Mr Jeffersons of whom we have no good bust. He will conform to your convenience, I presume before or after harvest will be most agreeable to you. I have the honor to be with great respect...
Some circumstances having ocurred, since I had the honor to write you on the subject of the appointment, you had the goodness to offer me; I have thought it best after mature reflection, to accept the same, if you have not Sir before this gets to hand, selected another person. It will take me from ten, to fifteen days, to close all my concerns here and at the farthest, I can be in Washington...
By a confidential letter received yesterday from an obliging friend at Washington I learnt you had done me the honor to appoint me accountant to the War department and that the Commission had been directed to me at Philadelphia where I presume it still lies in the Post office as it has never come to hand which I am a little surprised at as several letters directed to me in that City have been...
The letter you did me the favor to write me under date of the 24th of August after having travelled from Boston to Philadelphia and then back to Boston found me here a few days since which will account for my not having acknowledged the receipt of it before this. I have not forgotten Sir the great obligations I am under to you and that I have lived so much in your memory as to have merited...
I beg leave to inclose you a letter from Mr. Gard , professor at the Deaf and Dumb College in this city . He is considered in this country as a phenomenon for though deaf and dumb he is familiar with every branch of Science and literature—he wrote the inclosed himself, and brought it to me to correct but I thought it best to make no alteration in it. There is no one Sir who can appreciate his...
By the copy of my correspondences with the authorities here, which I have this day forwarded to the Secretary of State, you will see how necessary it is for me to quit Bordeaux, if not for ever, at least for a time. My situation Sir, is so very unpleasant, that I really have at some moments, fears for my safety. I have seen such dreadful scenes in this country formerly, that I have no...
I have been honored within these few days, by your letter of the 21st. December, to which I shall pay due attention. The confidence you have reposed in me, by continuing me for so many years in this office, has been highly flattering, and has proved my greatest consolation, in all the painful occurrences, I have of late experienced in this city, which has now become peculiarly disagreeable,...
Mr Espie, the President of the College at St. Foy in this department, has sent me the packet accompanying this, to be forwarded to you. He has the reputation of a man of great science, and litterature, and being a great admirer of our institutions, he intends I am told dedicating one of his works to you. If you should think proper to reply to his letter, I will take care that it reaches him....
I have shipped for you on board the Schooner Manlius Capt. Young one barrel of Vinegar and one box of Sweet oil both of the first quality. Wines & Brandy are at a price never known in this country such brandy as I sent you last year which cost only 200 fr. is now at 600 fs the pipe & such wine as I sent you by the Blooming Rose is at 6 fr. the bottle. I am sure both articles can be had much...
I have of late recd. a letter from C. Hughes Junr of Baltimore who went home from this place in the Transit with the Treaty of Ghent mentioning that a box had been sent to his house from that Vessel containing some french lamps and the object of his letter is to inquire if I knew to whom this box belongs—as I had before learnt that the wine I sent you by that Vessel had been drank on the...
I take the liberty to send you a copy of a work which I have published here with a view to enlighten the people of France on the motives of our War and to help our good cause. I beg you will read it with indulgence particularly that part relating to the Bourbons which the authorities here insisted on my inserting before they would permit me to print it. It is very imperfect for want of...
The lamentable news of the destruction of our Capitol has this moment reached us. Whilst I join the thousands of my countrey men in bewailing the humiliating and heart-burning castrophe, I shall not think my feelings lowered by offering my sincere congratula[ti]on the dangers you have escaped. In the prosecution of a savage war such as the enemy is now waging against us, all the means of...
Inclosed is an Invoice and Bill of Lading of one pipe of Brandy, two cases of wine, two baskets of oil, one box of cordials, one box of Prunes and one box of gloves which I have sent by the Brig Rambler Captain Snow who will enter them at the Custom house where he may arrive and will send you the account of the freight duties and other expences. I have consigned these articles to him in...
I beg leave to inclose a receipt for two cases containing one hundred bottles of the best Wine which I shipped for you on board the Schooner Engineer Capt. Dillingham bound to Newyork. The wines which I sent so long ago to Cherbourg to go in the Hornet Capt. Jones I have ordered here. The carriage of them from that place to this will cost but about 15. francs the hundred weight and I am in...
Ca. 30 August 1813, Bordeaux. “Being at this moment very unwell and almost blind I have it not in my power to transmit to you copies of my correspondence with Mr. Crawford & Mr. Warden touching my controversy with the latter and the motives of my writing a certain letter to the Duke of Bassano on which the President has demanded explanations of me through the Minister. That explanation has...
20 March 1813, Bordeaux. Promises to “send the President a good stock of wine, Brandy and liqueurs” by Ruth Barlow when she returns to the United States. “You will hear perhaps through the President and Mr Monroe of the ground I took while at Paris concerning the affairs of the Legation.… As there is a Secretary of Legation and a private Secretary to the late minister my desire was to preserve...
In the letter I took the liberty of writing you in such haste by the Hornet when stating the impression your private letter to Mr Barlow had made on me I hope I conveyed no other idea when I mentioned having heard that letter read than that Mr B. had communicated confidentially its contents to me. You know Sir something of the intimacy that has subsisted between Mr B and myself for upwards of...
Having this moment arrived from an excursion in the country and finding Mr Barlow is to dispatch Mr Biddle this evening I have not time to say all I could wish to you upon the State of our affairs here which are by no means flattering. The fears and suspicions expressed in your private letter by the Wasp are too well founded and I regretted much on hearing it read that I had not sent a letter...
At the earnest request of a distinguished french officer I have the honor to inclose you a letter from General Desfourneaux formerly Governor General of Guadeloupe. I have the honor to be With great respect Your devoted humble Servant. RC ( DLC ). The enclosure may have been one of the copies of Desfourneaux to JM, 1 Dec. 1811 .