You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Lee, Henry
    • Lee, Henry
    • Lee, Henry

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Lee, Henry" AND Author="Lee, Henry" AND Author="Lee, Henry"
Results 201-233 of 233 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 5
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I came here to see the S of war on army appointments & was obliged to wait till late in the evening before I could see him which detained me the night. This day I met G. W who urged me to his house & then ask⟨ed⟩ me to deliver the enclosed. On my way just now to do so, I learnt that yr. dinner company had assembled & I of course returned. I will stay this night in town & will wait on you...
I came here to pay you a short visit, but finding a carriage at yr. door I avoided trespassing so much on yr. time preferring as a lesser occupation thereof a short letter. This results cheifly from my wish to explain the reasons which influenced my suggestion the other day of the propriety of placing one or two bodys of yr. troops in reserve on the western frontier. To hold back the indians...
I so reluctantly address you on private business, when I knew that yr. public dutys claim every moment of yr. time, that no consideration short of pecuniary importance could induce me to do it. Learning from the S of State that Congress might possibly send a present of provisions to the distressed inhabitants of the Carracas, I suggested the hope that I might be entrusted with its presentment....
As the enclosed paper from the metropolis of yr. own state may not so soon reach yr. eye as in the way sent I therefore transmit it. In one paragraph Lord Cs. letter mentioned by you to day is fully met, & the subscribers to the paper seem to me as committed to support the govt. now with their lives & fortunes. I presume his Lordship’s letter will not long be with-held from the public. Yr....
I cannot with-hold from you what my heart so imperiously orders. The public good & yr. honor alike enjoin the measure if I am not in gross error. As you did in my presence hold back yr. general from offence, in like manner hold back yr. ships of war & privateers—give some time to hear from the enemy especially as the singular event lately occurred in England & the growing disposition there for...
I cannot refrain from expressing to you my apprehensions on a subject which mater[i]ally affects the public interest, & which from yr. course of life may escape your attention until too late for yr interposition. I would have waited on you for this purpose, but my painful face & the coldness of the season alike forbid me. The corps lately under the command of Brigadier Smythe have been placed...
I feel daily & hourly the effect of your & Admiral Warrens goodness to me, & my heart constantly avows the grateful sense of your & his goodness. Had I not escaped from my country, the climate must have finished me ere now. As it is, I am much bettered & have the agreable prospect of being restored to my usual health & strength. Altho a state of war interposed obstacles to my execution of my...
In a former letter, the only one I have written to you, I proffered my grateful & cordial thanks for the kindness you exemplified to me when with one foot in the grave; & intimated that my prospect of restoration to my former state of health was consoling, tho uncertain. Since that period, I have successively experienced the ebbs & floods common to continued disease, which confound my hopes &...
H. Lee has had the honour to receive Mr. Madison’s note of the 22nd April, and is glad to learn that the perusal of the volume transmitted by Mr. Garnett, is to be preceded by the study of that which it attempts to review. He hopes that either may requite the attention Mr Madison may bestow on it, and to lessen the demerit of the former, takes the liberty of inclosing a printed paper, which...
Having had the honour to transmit to M r Jefferson a copy of the ‘campaign of ’71 in the Carolinas’, with a view of rendering it less unworthy of his perusal, I forward the accompanying paper MHi .
Although I may not wish to be known , I expect to be reputed as the authour of the inclosed prospectus —which from its connection with American literature and politics presents an humble claim, to the notice of Mr. Madison, who has so much advanced and illustrated both these important subjects. I should be so much pleased to obtain his sentiments in regard to its style & principles that I am...
I do myself the honour to transmit for your examination, a small political essay, which for a particular purpose I prepared some weeks ago. I sincerely hope that its style & sentiments may attract your notice without incurring your disapprobation. Your long and efficient patriotic labours, Your devotion to the freedom of this country & to the rights of mankind, your task for the elegant &...
As the reputed authour of a rejected address which was reported to the Jackson Convention in this town, I take the liberty of forwarding for your perusal a correct copy of it —a step that seems proper as parts of your publick conduct, & points of the constitution, are touched upon in the paper. As the paper was prepared at the request of the committee & its tone attempered by the wishes of...
I had the honour to receive the other day your letter of the 10 th of this month covering a five dollar note, as your subscription in advance for one year to the paper I propose publishing. As it is an undertaking the completion of which depends upon my getting a certain number of subscribers (1000) I think it improper to receive or rather to retain money for it until its existence shall be...
It is, you must allow, very natural that any inquirer into the meaning of the constitution, should desire to have his conjectures, approved or corrected by yourself. I therefore take the liberty of forwarding for your consideration the enclosed paper, and shall be proud to hear that it receives in any degree the approbation of a chief architect of our political temple. Without daring to press...
It occurs to me that it may be desirable to the directors of the V a University to acquire the germ at least of a mineralogical collection, and I therefore take leave to mention to you that an acquaintance of mine in this city M r Ed— Myer is in possession of many specimens which are said to be rare and valuable. Among them are a number too which display to the least scientific observer, the...
The only definite proposition I can obtain from M r Wyer is that the collection of specimens in his possession—of various kinds—is at the service of the University at the moderate price of 2.500 dollars. His price is thus reduced as he says because his having destackeded in presents many shells & various fossils, and also because his situation renders coin more acceptable to himself than...
I heartily rejoice that your health is restored, and congratulate the lovers of your country and of learning, that your custom of visiting the university is renewed. There are three youths at the Columbian College in the suburbs of this city, whose parents have confided the direction of their studies and academical destiny to me, and as after a fair and patient experiment I am convinced that...
I now dispatch one of the youths I had some time ago the honour to mention to you, whose qualifications are less extended than those of the other two , but whose preparations for movement are more foward. His name is Robert Wallace, & his birth place the county of King George—though I know not that it is important to say, “to whom ( he is ) related, or by whom begot.” His age exceeds 16...
I am unwilling that my enthusiasm in favour of your university should not be effectively known to you, I therefore take occasion, even at the risk of tasking your condescension & patience, to mention that in addition to M r Wallace who is now at the university, the two Browns, Richard & Frederick, are removed from the college here, & are to be sent at my instance, from to the University. I...
The inclination which I expressed to you several years ago, in 1823 I believe, to devote myself to the cultivation of letters, still besets me, & I have been fortunate enough to select a subject which is capable of receiving and conferring ⟨imperishable?⟩ honour. Whether I shall be able to do it justice is a question which labour, patience, diligence, & the inspiration of the historic muse,...
I felt myself pleased and honoured by your letter, & shall avail myself of the earliest stage of maturity that my materials may present, to impose on your politeness and patience in the manner you seem to prefer. Genl. Armstrong has also been liberal & encouraging but I am fearful of his competition, knowing that I must be content with the second place. But I aim at truth & truth has charms...
At the request of some military friends, and in compliance with a desire which I have for several years entertained, I am preparing a second edition of my fathers memoirs of the Southern war—with his own M.S. corrections, with the advantage of various suggestions from Col. Howard & with such additions and explanations as my own acquaintance with the subject will enable me to furnish. In this...
Since my last letter it has occurred to me that it should have contained an idea which I did not express. It is this—that under the circumstances in which the Governours of States, and the Continental Officers were placed, it is reasonable to suppose that however correct the conduct of the former may have been, the opinions of the latter would be unfavourable to them. Indeed, the more...
I have read with great satisfaction your letter of the 15 th and most heartily thank you for the cordiality of its spirit, the value of its details; for the liberal estimate you place upon my motives, and the fairness of your expressions, respecting my father. In attempting to do justice to you, and ascertain and communicate in his name, the truth, I am sure, if such things can reach here now,...
In examining the events of the late war I believe I have ascertained that when in the fall of 1813, it became obvious that the campaign in the North would terminate in the disgrace of promising much and doing nothing, the govt projected a plan for the operations of the ensuing year, of which the principal feature was to assemble a large force just within the limits of Canada, and near the...
For your letter of the 16th. Feby I now beg leave to express my thanks, and shall take occasion shortly to add some observations, with a view of getting further information on parts of it. I have recd such high recommendations of the bearer Mr. Clarke, an English Gentleman who is travelling for health & information; and have concieved such sincere esteem for him from an intimate acquaintance...
In tracing the conduct and character of Genl. Jackson I have had a correspondence with Genl. Armstrong upon the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of the 18th. July 1814—authorising him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola. It appears that order was not recd. until after the peace, on or about the 14th. March of 1815. The circumstances under which it was recd....
To ensure your well-pleased extension of the usual kindness of your hospitality to Mr. Alfred Langdon Elwyn (the bearer of this note) I have only to mention that he is the grandson of the great patriot of New Hampshire, with whose public & private virtues you <...> doubtly familiar. Returned from a long and studious residence in England & France, he is desirous of seeing our university, and of...
It is some time since I submitted to the public certain observations on the writings of the late Mr. Jefferson, intended to vindicate my fathers memory from a gross and virulent slander contained in that mass of misrepresentations. Many of these observations were suggested by a letter of the 28th. Decr. 1794, addressed by Mr. Jefferson to yourself. Its first paragraph I did not refer to, as I...
I have had the honour to receive your letter of the 14th of August, and have read it with that reverence which your age, and that respect which your character inspires. I beg to thank you for pointing out the misprint in regard to Mr Jay, which had led me into a labirynth of unpleasing conjectures. I regret that you have not condescended to correct the errors you perceive in my observations on...
It is some time since I had the honour to receive and acknowledge your letter of the 14th. of August last. I infer from it that you Conceive there are many misstatements and false inferences in my observations. I have therein stated on the authority of Mr. Jefferson that Genl. Washington wished you to accept the offer of Secy. of State as successor to Mr. Jefferson, and that you declined it. I...
I have this moment had the honour to receive your letter covering copies of a variety of my respected fathers letter to you about the years 1790. 91: and 92. As the packet is to leave Havre on the 16th. I lose not a moment in acknowledging your extreme kindness in doing me this favour. The best return I can make for it is to facilitate your obtaining the copies you desire of your own letters...