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    • Lee, Henry
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I had the honor this moment to receive from the mail just arrived (Interrupted by the vast fall of rain) your l[ett]er of the 11th. My anticipation of the necessity of information to you On the point trusted to me, induced me to expend my own money to secure to my letr a timely reply—th[e] substance was instantly forwarded to you, which I hope reached you soon after your ler of the 11th was...
Letter not found: from Henry Lee, 28 June 1757. On 30 June 1757 GW wrote to Lee: “I have received yours of the 28th instant.”
I have just returned from Newark, where I Completed the business your Exccelly committed to me. The virtuous serjeant deserted last night, I saw the two in newark this day. This night they go to york. Desertion among us is a a stranger; my officers are very attentive, & some of them men of nice discernment, this leads me to apprehend they will discover that the Serjeant is on some secret...
In my last I told you that I had contrived to get an unsuspected private friend to hire an express to carry a le[tte]r from me to Mr. H. as I found waiting for private conveyances too tedious. I have this moment reced his reply, after expressing himself very anxious indeed, to evidence (especially at the present crisis) by some public act his attachment to you & after declaring his sense of my...
I am willing to guarantee the land as you may choose, provided you will agreable to the spirit of our bargain secure my payment for the horse in Kentucky lands, should those sold to you prove insecure or doubtful in title. You have alone or in conjunction with Mr Lewis a tract of land near Suffolk, which if you incline to sell I shall be glad to negotiate for. I must trouble you to forward to...
Mr Custis presented me with yr letr last night. Be assured I shall offer you no property not clear in title unless I may be imposed on, to prevent which am I here daily engaged in exploring the truth. I have a tract of land near gunston recd from W. Steptoe at valuation for money lent to him some years past. this I propose to offer among other property all of which will be submitted to you...
We are informed by Doctor William Savage that You became Security for Mrs Margeret G[r]een in a bond to Fairfax Court as the Law directs for the Administration of the Estate of the late Revd Mr Charles Green deced which Administration being vested in the said Savage We at his desire do hereby become Counter Security to you and do Oblige ourselves our Exrs and Admrs in the same Penalty and as...
your late orders for a detachment of militia & proclamation give birth to a variety of sensations & opinions. All good citizens deplore the events which have produced this conduct on your part, & feel but one determination to maintain inviolate our happy government at the risk of their lives & fortunes—there are some among us from the influence of party spirit & from their own ambitious views...
As soon after my hearing of your return to Mt Vernon as I could, I sat out for a visit to you, but unfortunately your stay at home was so short that I could not see you. I had reached Stafford court house when I accidentally learned that you had departed on the previous sunday, and on knowing this I instantly turned back from whence I came. This disappointment would have always been mortifying...
Too often am I obliged to intrude on your time, which I assure you I very reluctantly do, as I well know how much the business of others avocate your attention from your own concerns. But the importance of the business which I wish to receive your aid in, I hope will be deemed in some degree an apology. Mr Madison & myself have determined to make sale of part of our joint property at the great...
Permit me my dear president to offer my congratulations on the late unanimous renewal of affection & confidence on the part of your fellow-citizens, & to pray that the auspicious event may be attended with the happiest effects to you and to them. Col. Basset died on the fourth instant in consequence of a fall from his horse—Your amiable nephew at Eltham continues to linger without the smallest...
On receipt of your Excellency’s letter directing the cavalry to halt, the corps were billeted in the vicinity of Chester-town. Your lettr of the 8th inst. reached us on the 9th in the afternoon—The Troops moved at three oclock, & arrived here this morning. We mean to halt & refresh for a few hours & then pursue our route to springfield—Your Excellency will please to favor me with your orders...
I informed your Excelly in my advice of yesterday that the British fleet after playing off & on had returned to port on the 18th. They sailed again in the evening & night of the same day; bearing their course southerly. On the 20th in the afternoon, some were seen on their return; from this, it was concluded the whole Fleet were following. But three frigates only reached the hook this Morning....
I return my dear General the papers you gave me having laid the foundation of a future sale if agreable then to you. The previous requisites are the possession of the other shares of the company and a law authorizing foreigners to hold real property in Virginia—Both these can be effected in the course of the year. I would have called & taken leave of you & Mrs Washington, but did not like to...
The moment I had fixed Captain Rudulphs business in Monmouth county, I proceeded to this town; where I am waiting for my orders. I have the honor to be with perfect respect Your Excellency’s most obt h. Sert DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Letter not found: from Henry Lee, 15 Nov. 1784. On 18 Nov. Lee wrote to GW : “I did myself the pleasure of writing to you on the 15th.”
Since my last the B. fleet has returned to their station off Sandy hook & again sailed. It is said that the Cork fleet is daily expected; if so, probably, the maneuvres of the navy are designed to cover them. I have the honor to be sir with the greatest respect your Excllys most ob. h. servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
As one who asks no employment but will accept of it, if public considerations should make his service proper do I now address You. We have heard of a defeat of the Western Army & popular clamour is loud. If the events of war should render a change in the command of your troops necessary, & you should consider me equal to the charge, such is my miserable condition from the vicissitude attendant...
When I reached this place which was as soon as my necessary call at home would permit I gave your letr to Mr Lee who replied to it by the succeeding post affirmatively as I understand. You will have heard of the curious resolutions which had passed the house of delegates—the object of which is too plain to doubt—with all proper dispatch they have been attended to by those who considered them...
My Corps reached Slotterdam yesterday evening, where they halt this day. In the mean time I have hurried to Camp to receive your Excellencys orders for the disposal of them, on their arrival here. I gave orders to Gen.. Rudulph to deliver Mr Andersons horse to him. The horse is gelded & Mr Anderson refuses him. When I left Monmouth I directed Capt. Rudulph to be under the guidance of Gen....
Inclosed you have the patents for the land sold to you. I have Doer Skinners deed with me which is recorded in the general court, therefore when you please my conveyance can be made —It is my custom to convey only with special warrantee viz. against me & all claiming under me—this I hope will be satisfactory to you—the title I have not the smallest doubt of, should you think differently I will...
We have been all again made most miserable by the accounts received of the desperate state of your health—True it is that the general gloom has been succeeded by joy in as much as we have just heard that you was safe & likely to be restored to your usual vigor. But when I recollect that in the course of a few months you have been twice dangerously ill, & am informed by all who have seen you of...
I find myself fatigued with my journey or should wait on you this evening. While in Newyork I mentioned to a friend of mine there your pair of horses & price—He has authorized me to buy them, money to be paid (1000 Ds.) on delivery. I promised to write to him by tomorrows mail, & consequently must ask your decision this evening. Please to present my best respects to Mrs Washington & tell her...
I am to receive in the course of next month Judge Wilsons bonds payable in one & two years to the amount of your demand for your dismal swamp lands. If you will take your original price thus payable I will purchase—my enquiry respecting the Judges affairs leaves not a doubt in my mind of his ability & I had full conviction from a recent transaction of his honor & integrity. Most respectfully...
The day after you left Alexa., I wrote to Mr Richard Lee in Richmond, requesting him to examine Docr Skinners papers for the pattents & to forward them to me. I have not received his reply. Mr Fendal is not yet decided whether he will go to Barbadoes or to Norfolk—Mrs Fendals situation is more & more precarious & perhaps Mr Fendal will judge it adviseable to proceed directly to the islands. I...
Till very lately have I felt myself well enough to discharge my daily dutys & now hardly fit for writing—But your letr (without date) recd last evg as well as my constant desire to administer to your information so far as I can, induces me to sieze the first opportunity of replying. Mr H. was written to by me in a way to obtain his answer by a direct opportunity which was presented in the...
I examined the country directed by your Excellency yesterday. I find a position most convenient for an army on the road by Captain Marsailles to Col. Deys. Having passed Marsailles house one mile, you arrive at the junction of the Paramus & Deys road. Here commences the position I allude to, & continues along Deys road. A very copious branch of water runs close to the camp in front—smaller...
General Lee returns herewith the paper which the President was pleased to give to him last evening—He has derived great pleasure from its perusal and presents a complete refutation of all the charges exhibited agst govt by Mr adet & breathes throughout a spirit of moderation & friendship which ought to produce the happiest effects. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have engaged two persons to undertake the accomplishment of your Excellency’s wishes. In my negotiation I have said little or nothing concerning your Excellency as I presumed it would operate disagreeably, should the issue prove disastrous. the cheif of the two persons is a sergeant in my cavalry. To him I have promised promotion, the other is an inhabitant of Newark; I have had experience...
Altho the enclosed account which came to hand yesterday is by no means complete, yet I think it worthy of transmission, as I am sure you will be very anxious to receive every additional information on the late disaster in the west. The writer I am told is entitled to full credit—We may I think truely infer from this communication that the enemy paid dearly for their victory, or General St...