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    • Lee, Henry
    • Lee, Henry
    • Lee, Henry
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    • Washington, George
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Lee, Henry" AND Author="Lee, Henry" AND Author="Lee, Henry" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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I had the honor this moment to receive from the mail just arrived (Interrupted by the vast fall of rain) your l[ett]er of the 11th. My anticipation of the necessity of information to you On the point trusted to me, induced me to expend my own money to secure to my letr a timely reply—th[e] substance was instantly forwarded to you, which I hope reached you soon after your ler of the 11th was...
In my last I told you that I had contrived to get an unsuspected private friend to hire an express to carry a le[tte]r from me to Mr. H. as I found waiting for private conveyances too tedious. I have this moment reced his reply, after expressing himself very anxious indeed, to evidence (especially at the present crisis) by some public act his attachment to you & after declaring his sense of my...
your late orders for a detachment of militia & proclamation give birth to a variety of sensations & opinions. All good citizens deplore the events which have produced this conduct on your part, & feel but one determination to maintain inviolate our happy government at the risk of their lives & fortunes—there are some among us from the influence of party spirit & from their own ambitious views...
As soon after my hearing of your return to Mt Vernon as I could, I sat out for a visit to you, but unfortunately your stay at home was so short that I could not see you. I had reached Stafford court house when I accidentally learned that you had departed on the previous sunday, and on knowing this I instantly turned back from whence I came. This disappointment would have always been mortifying...
Permit me my dear president to offer my congratulations on the late unanimous renewal of affection & confidence on the part of your fellow-citizens, & to pray that the auspicious event may be attended with the happiest effects to you and to them. Col. Basset died on the fourth instant in consequence of a fall from his horse—Your amiable nephew at Eltham continues to linger without the smallest...
I return my dear General the papers you gave me having laid the foundation of a future sale if agreable then to you. The previous requisites are the possession of the other shares of the company and a law authorizing foreigners to hold real property in Virginia—Both these can be effected in the course of the year. I would have called & taken leave of you & Mrs Washington, but did not like to...
As one who asks no employment but will accept of it, if public considerations should make his service proper do I now address You. We have heard of a defeat of the Western Army & popular clamour is loud. If the events of war should render a change in the command of your troops necessary, & you should consider me equal to the charge, such is my miserable condition from the vicissitude attendant...
When I reached this place which was as soon as my necessary call at home would permit I gave your letr to Mr Lee who replied to it by the succeeding post affirmatively as I understand. You will have heard of the curious resolutions which had passed the house of delegates—the object of which is too plain to doubt—with all proper dispatch they have been attended to by those who considered them...
We have been all again made most miserable by the accounts received of the desperate state of your health—True it is that the general gloom has been succeeded by joy in as much as we have just heard that you was safe & likely to be restored to your usual vigor. But when I recollect that in the course of a few months you have been twice dangerously ill, & am informed by all who have seen you of...
I find myself fatigued with my journey or should wait on you this evening. While in Newyork I mentioned to a friend of mine there your pair of horses & price—He has authorized me to buy them, money to be paid (1000 Ds.) on delivery. I promised to write to him by tomorrows mail, & consequently must ask your decision this evening. Please to present my best respects to Mrs Washington & tell her...