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    • Lee, Henry
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    • Lee, Henry
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I have not heard from you for a long time but often hear of you. All ranks of people within my observation seem highly pleased with the govt. since its commencement & reckon far too much on the benefits which it may produce—these expectations will meet with disappointment, which may create chagrin in the public mind & renew clamor. The president is dear to the citizens beyond parralel or...
Altho the exalted station which your love of us and our love of you has placed you in, calls for change in mode of address, yet I cannot so quickly relinquish the old manner. Your military good holds its place in my mind notwithstanding your civic glory, & whenever I do abandon the title which used to distinguish you I shall do it with awkwardness. The affectionate and decided regard...
The last ler. I got from you shewed the little leisure you possessed, & together with other considerations induced me to decline for a time writing to you. Indeed occupied with matters of a private nature only, I am out of the habit of communication as well as conversation with political affairs. In my tour in the upper country for Mrs Lee[’]s health, I have as much as in my power attended to...
Least my brother should have returned I take the liberty of asking your safe delivery of the two lets. enclosed & any reply which may be given to you for me. At the same time let me present my hearty gratulations on the proper honor you have received from our country. I anticipate good to the public & new lustre to my friend notwithstanding the obstinate difficultys & embarrassments which...
The letr. sent to your care, be pleased to return. Your undertaking is truely arduous but I trust as you progress in the work, difficulty will vanish. From your situation you must be able to form with some certainty an opinion concerning the domestic debt. Will it speedily rise, will the interest accruing command specie or any thing nearly as valuable, what will become of the indents already...
Mr. Burnley will convey this letr. by some one of the many of your county people now here with their tobacco. In it you will receive a letr. sent to me from Alexa. by Mr C Lee on the presumption that you was or would be here. The assembly have gone thro most of their business, & are now engaged in consideration of the amendments proposed by Congress, to the constitution. Some time ago Mr....
I beg leave to make known to you the bearer Docr. Morrow. He was early engaged in the service of the U States as a naval surgeon. He continued in this employment thro various vicissitudes, suffering extreme hardships, & acquitted himself with honor & reputation. He understands that naval hospitals will be established & wishes to resume his old employment. His knowledge, his amiability of...
Since your illness at Georgetown I have heard nothing of you, only that you had so far recovered as to proceed, until yesterday, when a gentleman from Alexandria told me that you had taken your seat in Congress. This information gave me pleasure, as it seemed to communicate your complete recovery, as well as because it assured me that you was executing your duty at a time which seems big with...
Before I left home, Col Lee being about to depart for Congress, I wrote you by him. Since my arival here I got your letr. of the 1st. March, & have had an opportunity of reading your debates in Congress. Your motion which underwent so much discussion & met with such a decided negative is pleasing to the landed interest in this Country, & very much disrelished by the town interest. It is...
I am induced to address you on a subject which violates the rule I had lately prescribed to myself with respect to our public affairs. A youth the son of Mr. Thomas L. Lee to whom I beleive you was intimately known met me this morning on the road. Bred to the mercantile line in one of the most respectable houses in our country & cut off from his expectations there, by the death of his...