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The Alliance between this Kingdom, and the United States of America, is an Event of such Magnitude in their History, that We conceive it would be highly pleasing to our Constituents, to have the Picture of their his Majesty their illustrious Friend and Ally, to be kept in some Public Place where the Congress sits. We would carefully avoid every Thing which would be disagreable to the King and...
1778 Debit Credit Novemb. 12 Pour Solde du précédent Compte. 439728. 15. 7. Pour une traite de Mr. Hy. Laurens Président du 7. 9bre. 1777. à 30. jours de vue, dont ces Mrs. ont été debités deux fois au lieu d’une. 900. 12 Acceptation de M. B. Franklin à une traite de J. Philips du 28. Septemb. à uso 1200. 17 Payé à Mr. Arthur Lée sur recu 4800. 18 Acceptation de Mr. B. Franklin, à traite de...
We have received the Letter which your Excellency did Us the Honour to write to Us, on the 14 of this Month, and in answer to the Proposal Enquiry, contained in it, We beg Leave to acquaint your Excellency that there is not now in France, nor to our Knowledge, in Europe, any Frigate or other Vessell of War, belonging to the United States. If there was, We should not hesitate to order her,...
In Answer to your Letter of the seventeenth Instant, We desire you would ship to America, all the Goods belonging to the United States, of every sort. And consequently to write for no more Workmen, but dismiss, immediately, all that remain if any. We can give you no Directions about the Articles “entreposed” for the Coast of Guinea: because We understand nothing about the Matter. We neither...
Your Letter informing me of the Alteration of your Intention, not having reached my House till some time after the Hour you had appointed for setting out for Versailles, I was gone before it arrived. I informed Count Vergennes, that you were coming, and we waited till 5’ O’Clock under no small Embarressment, especially myself, to conceive what detained you. Count Vergennes says, that as there...
To His Excellency Count de Vergennes, Minister & Secretary of State for foreign Affairs: At the time the American War began there was very little real Money in that Country, the same having been constantly drawn out as fast as it came in to pay for British Manufactures and Importations of foreign Goods by the British Merchants, with the Duties and other Expences occasioned by their Monopoly....
Some late Proceedings of the Enemy, have induced us, to submit a few Observations to your Excellency’s superior Lights and Judgement. His Britannic Majesty’s Commissioners, in their Manifesto of the 3d of October, have denounced “a Change in the whole Nature and future Conduct of the War,” they have declared “that the Policy as well as Benevolence of Great Britain, have thus far checked the...
We have been favoured with a Letter signed by many Gentlemen of Nantes and dated the fifteenth of this Month, informing us that most of their Vessels were ready to sail to America, and that others were expected to be ready immediately, so that the Convoy need not wait at all, but might be ordered as soon as Convenience will permit. These Gentlemen are very desirous of a Convoy through the...
We had the Honour of receiving your Excellency’s Letter of the 22d, and are much obliged to you for the Interest you take in what concerns the unhappy Prisoners who may escape from England. We have not been inattentive to that Subject. There are Persons who Supply them at Bourdeaux, Brest, l’Orient, Nantes and Dunkirk. A Gentleman at Calais has voluntarily done this service for which We have...
We are honoured with yours of without a date. We wrote you on the Second of this Month to which We refer. We have written to Mr. Gilbank several Times that We could furnish him with no more Money, and that We should protest his Bills. If he will not believe Us, When the Bills arrive if they ever do, which We hope they will not, our Protest Refusal and the consequent Protest Will Convince him....
We have the Honour to inclose to your Excellency two Memorials concerning a French Vessell retaken from an English Privateer by An American Privateer the Hampden commanded by Captain Pickering. As there is nothing in either of the Treaties between his Majesty and the united States, respecting such Rescues and Recaptures the Laws of each State must govern the Cases of the Vessells carried into...
Your Excellency did Us the Honour to inform Us, sometime ago, that in order to obtain the Liberty of Americans, taken on board of English Vessells by his Majestys ships it was necessary, that We should inform your Excellency, that they had been made Prisoners by the English and forced into their service. We accordingly request the Liberty of William Berry, William Keating, John Williams,...
The Letter which you did Us the Honour to write Us on the 15 December, We have received. As We have heard nothing further of the Congress in Germany, which you inform Us was talked of, We presume that no such Measure will take Place. However, whether there be a Congress or not, We cannot comply with the Terms of the Gentleman you mention, nor Advise him to take any Steps in the Business. We...
We had Yesterday the Honour of your Letter of the seventh of this Month, and at the same Time that of a Letter from his Excellency the Comte De Sartine Vergennes, Copy of which We inclose. We have this Day written to his Excellency, requesting, that the Convoy may be sent without delay to Nantes, where the Vessells are waiting for it. We are very sorry, that the Kings service will not Admit,...
My fever not being yet sufficiently removd to permit me to come to you; I write to you to submit the absolute necessity there is of informing the Minister without delay of the State of our Finances and that the Supply we have askd is immediately necessary. It is possible they may wait for such information before they put the intention we are told they have of supplying us in execution. We...
M. Monthieu calld on me yesterday, but I was too ill to see him. I suppose it was to urge the payment of his demand, which I am by no means yet satisfyd is due. The Papers he has given in, instead of vouching it , render it suspected. The only true and sufficient Voucher is the receit which Mr. Williams did give, or ought to have given to M. Peltier de Doyer at the time he sa id ys he deliverd...
We had the honor of receiving your Excellency’s Letter of the 20th. enclosing M. de Sartine’s Answer, relative to the Convoy which we requested of your Excellency, for the Ships now assembled at Nantes. We are totally at a loss to understand what Mr. de Sartine writes of four Vessels mentioned by us, as ready to sail and a Convoy having sailed with two of them. We never mentioned any thing...
We had Yesterday the Honour of your Letter of the Twenty first of this Month. You desire to know what Port or Ports, is or are made free, pursuant to the Treaty? We believe that none have as yet been determined on. At present all the Ports of France, are open, to American Vessells of all Denominations, and we are at present rather doubtful whether it would be politick in Us to apply to have...
We have this Moment the Honour of your Letter of the Twenty Eighth of last Month, and shall give the earliest Attention to its im­ portant Contents, but We are unhappy to think that it is not in our Power to give effectual Relief. By the Treaty Consuls &c. are to be appointed, in the respective Ports, But the Power of appointing, Such important officers is wholly with the Congress—they have...
To a written Letter, one of you was civil enough to return me a verbal answer, that Doctor Bancroft was appointed to transact business for us in England, and that his instructions shoud be sent to me. Why you shoud think that in the choice of a person to represent us, I shoud have no voice; I am at a loss to conceive. The notorious character of Dr. Bancroft as a Stockjobber is perfectly known...
Having not seen the Letter of Mr. Williams to which one of those sent me is an Answer I cannot form any judgment of it. As there are no marks mentiond by which Mr. Deanes claim to any of the Goods in the possession of the public Agent can be ascertaind—as all the Goods in question, were, when receivd, declard to be on account of the public; and as I perceive in the Banker’s Accounts very large...
It is now near six Months that Capt. McNeil, of the Mifflin Privateer from America, has been embarras’d with a Process on Account of a French Ship, which he retook from the English after she had been three Days in their Possession. The Laws of France are clear with regard to the Validity of this Prize, and our Captains have Orders, contained in their Commissions, to submit their Prizes to the...
We have received your Letters of the 12 Decr. and 23 of January. In the first You propose that We should write to Messrs. Horneca and Fitzeaux to pass the Amount of the Goods you mention to our Debit. In that of 23 of January, you propose that one of the Cases Still remaining in Mr. Schweighausers Hands should be delivered to you, and that We should give orders to Mess. Horneca &c. to replace...
I perceive by the letter you have sent me that Mr. Deane’s claim is ascertaind by marks, and therefore have signd the letter. But I think enquiry shoud be made after those goods which were bought with the public Money in Holland, and which those now given up were supposd to be. I am unwilling to sign the Letter to Capn. Jones, because it does not contain the whole of the facts on that Subject,...
We have received your Letter of Feb. 9. offering your Services to the public by going to England to negotiate an Exchange of Prisoners. We have considered this Subject and judging it necessary to send some Person upon this Business, We have determined to accept of your Proposition, and We desire you to prepare yourself for the Journey, with all convenient Dispatch. Your Instructions shall be...
Yesterday’s advices from England inform us, that Gen. Lincoln was collecting an Army in S. Carolina to meet the Invaders, and that Prévot was to be re-inforcd from N. York; so that it looks as if the War woud be transferd to the Southward. The English loan rises rapidly in its value, as appears by the Omnium, which in a few days mounted from 4 PCt. to 6½. Besides this our Enemies will...
I receivd your favor by Mr. Blodget and thank you. It seems uncertain where or how this will find you, therefore I shall not enclose the Cypher. When I know where a private hand may find you, I will send it so as to be secure. A person is nominated to take the place of the great man at Philada. who will leave it upon his arrival. You will probably get thither before him. We have no other local...
Either my Letter to you of the 29th. March miscarried or you are in my debt. The inclosed MS which belongs to you was seald to go by Mr. Ford and was omitted by mistake. This will be delivered to you by the Chevalier de la Luzerne and M. de Marbois, whom you will find to be Gentlemen worthy of the important trusts they fill. I am much obliged to you for your kindness to Mr. Ford, and hope you...
By advices from America since my last to you, my Enemies are determind to impeach my attachment to our Country and our her cause, per fas et per nefas. This makes it necessary for me to request of you, your opinion on that point, from the knowlege you have had of my conduct while we acted together in Commission. The Calumnies of wicked men, can only be refuted by the testimony of those who are...
Desirous as I am of returning you my thanks for the very honorable proof you have given me of your esteem; I cannot wish that this may find you in Port. I am not under the least apprehensions of their succeeding for any time against us personally; but I am afraid they will injure the public and introduce a system of faction and corruption which it will be very difficult to change. For me the...
I cannot omit this opportunity of congratulating you, on your being again in the bosom of those you love; after delays so many and so mortifying. I have signifyd my hope to our firm friend , that you will be immediately sent to Congress as a Member, where I hope you and M. de la Luzerne will be able to put a stop to those unworthy proceedings, by which little and malignant Spirits joind with...
You had an opportunity of seeing the commencement of this business of Jones and the Alliance, of which I enclose you the suite. Capt. Landais has been orderd from Amsterdam to Passy by Dr. Franklin where the Doctor, M. Chaumont and Dr. Bancroft have held a Court of Enquiry upon his conduct, and their report, I am told, is to be transmitted to Congress. In the mean time Jones has taken...
By the bursting of the Lock of one of my trunks on the journey, I was so unfortunate as to lose the packet of M. Gerards Letters; among which was that you copied, and of which I must beg you to send me an authenticated Copy. Since my arrival here, I receivd a Packet from Congress which came by the Confederacy. In that is the Copy of one of the most false and wicked Papers I have read upon the...
I have but one moment to thank you, for your favor with one from London enclosd which I received on my return from Brest. We are likely to be detaind here by the prize-money for the Serapis &c. not being paid, without which the Crew of the Alliance threaten a Mutiny. If, as I apprehend it may, the application I requested you to make to Mr. G rand should at all interfere with your plan, which I...
I am obliged to you for yours of the 31st. which I received by Capt. Landais. You will have perceived by my last, that what you write relative to an application to Mr. Grand was what struck me upon reflection. Far from wishing to involve you with such People, I am clearly of opinion that it never will be for your honor or interest, or those of the public, to have any connection with them. The...
I am obligd to you for your favor of the 25th. ultimo. The enclosd was an old Letter of the 13 Sepr. 1779. I lament with you the impediments which are studiously thrown in the way of all confidential communication with America on the transactions in Europe, except thro’ a particular channel. All persons begin now to be persuaded, that the Alliance was never intended for America, and that all...
By the enclosed copy of a Letter I have sent Capt. Jones you will see that the dispute between him and Capt. Landais, is come to an alarming higth. The latter went on board the Alliance yesterday and has the command of her. The former has claimd the protection of the governing powers here, who will not employ force unless they have an express order for it from Above, or they come to blows on...
I have but one moment to tell you, that I left Mrs. Adams your Children, General and Mrs. Warren in good health four days ago. I shall soon set out for Philadelphia. Hancock is chosen Governor, owing cheifly to your absence. I paid a visit to Mrs. Dana at Cambrige, who with her Children are well. Please to remember me to her Husband. Mr. S. A. is at Congress, which is very thin. They have...
Having come here to converse with the worthy Governor, an opportunity of his Dispatch is afforded me of writing you a single line to inform you of my having left Mrs. Adams and all your friends well a few days since. Mr. Hancock is chosen Governor, much owing to your absence and the in-attention of those who wish well to their Country and will probably repent of their inactivity. Measures are...
I wrote you a long letter of the 30th. Decr. 1780 to which I have not yet receivd any answer. But I cannot help writing a line to you by this opportunity, as well to congratulate you on the success of your negociations in Holland as to mention to you what I think may be of material concern to you; that the present minister for foreign affairs is as devoted a partizan of Count de Vergennes and...
I enclose you some late proceedings by which you will perceive that Mr. Laurens is to be made a victim if possible to the system of throwing every thing into one man’s hands. By these votes you will judge pretty accurately who are Devotees to this unjust, unwise, and irrepublican system. Except that of N. Y. where one of the ays was from policy given against the motion of which he was probably...
The Ratification having this day, the first on which nine States were represented, been unanimously passed; a special Messenger will be immediately dispatchd with it which gives me an opportunity of writing a few words to you which may arrive speedily & safely. The department of foreing Affairs being not yet filld, the business is of course in disorder & neglected. The arrangement of that...
I cannot let this opportunity, thõ, from M r. Jefferson’s hurry, a transitory one, pass; without writing you a line. The arrangement of our foreign affairs which makes M r Jay Secretary here, & joins M r. Jefferson with you, must I think be pleasing to you, as they both have a friendship for you & are men of ability. It was my wish that the negociations might be carried on at the Hague or in...
Your favor of the 6 th of April found me here two days ago, waiting for the necessary preparatives to a definitive treaty of peace & boundary, which in conjunction with some other gentlemen I have undertaken to negociate with the indian nations. To œconomize, by saving the expence of a monthly bounty to which the troops of Massachusetts & N. Hampshire, were entitled, A Majority of Congress...
I do not know whether I shoud congratulate you on your appointment to the Court of London; since it appears to me the most painful & difficult negociation you coud undertake. The intimate knowlege they have of us, together with the similitude of language manners, & habits will render it more difficult by far to gaurd against their instruments, than against those of any other Court. Besides you...
Being at this place, on private business, I cannot omit the opportunity of writing to you. The critical & alarming situation of this Country, makes me extremely anxious to hear the issue of your negociations at S t. James’s. An obstinate adherence, on the part of the british, to thier present commercial system; will, for a time, involve us in great difficulties. But I am persuaded, the...
My Nephew Tho s. Lee Shippen wishes to be recommended to your patronage; & I am satisfyd he cannot be under better protection. I therefore entreat you to let him find favor in your sight, & that you will have the goodness to assist him with your advice, in the conduct of his legal Studies which he purposes to finish at the Temple. Our finances are unhappily at as low an ebb, as they who think...
My Nephew Tho s. Lee Shippen wishes to be recommended to your patronage; & I am satisfyd he cannot be under better protection. I therefore entreat you to let him find favor in your sight, & that you will have the goodness to assist him with your advice, in the conduct of his legal Studies which he purposes to finish at the Temple. Our finances are unhappily at so low an ebb, as they who think...
In your Letter of the 19 th May last, you were pleased to inform us that you had already accepted Bills which had been drawn on you to a considerable amount by M r. Barclay and Lamb, in consequence of the appropriation which had been made by Congress for forming Treaties with the Barbary Powers; but as we have no advice from you since that date we are at a loss to know whether the whole or...
I received, my dear Sir, your Republics, & am much honord with the office you asign me. I had before read them & nothing material occurrd to me as amendments. The title is the only thing exceptionable, because it applys to that particular part only which respects M. Furgot. But the work will undoubtedly be of very great service, in directing the consideration of our Countrymen to the defects...