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A report has reached Virga. that since your V. Presidency you made in the City of Philadelphia a declaration nearly in the following words viz “That war with France might be expected unless america made Compensation and Concessions for injuries alledged to have been received by the former: also resinded the British Treaty, and that your exertions would be to effect those measures before you...
It is not without great apprehension of presuming too much on the favor you have always shown me, that I offer you my Services, as a Judge of the Supreme Court which is now establishing. The having been calld to the bar in Westminster hall after five years study at the Temple, & having practisd the Law there for some time—are the grounds, Sir, on which I presume to ask your protection. I...
I receivd your favor, my dear Sir, by which I percieve you are once more a farmer at Braintree—a real Cincinnatus without being of that noble Body which resembles him in name alone. I am inclined to believe that you also will be calld from your plough to fill the place of Vice President under the new Constitution. Virginia, I think will return Genl. Washington and yourself. If the four New...
Give me leave to congratulate you on your happy arrival in your native Country; & on the respectable reception that has attended it. I beg the favor of you to present my congratulations on the same account to Mrs. Adams. Thou I am not an Admirer of the new Constitution, yet as you approve of it & as a great many wise and good men expect much honor & advantage to our Country from the adoption...
I enclose you the long expected production of the Convention. I am inclined to think you will deem it somewhat too Aristocratic. An Oligarchy however I think will spring from it in the powers of the President & Vice President, who, if they understand one another, will easily govern the two Houses to their will. The omission of a Declaration of rights—the appointment of a vice President, whose...
We are favor’d with your Letter of the 8th of May last, transmitting Protests for Non Acceptance of the two Bills of Exchange for 75,000 Florin’s; drawn by Constable Rucker and Co. of New York by on their Partner Mr. John Rucker of London—From the Solidity of the House by whom the Bill was drawn (being a Partnership with Mr. Robert Morris of Phila.) we had not the most distant apprehension of...
I received, my dear Sir, your Republics, & am much honord with the office you asign me. I had before read them & nothing material occurrd to me as amendments. The title is the only thing exceptionable, because it applys to that particular part only which respects M. Furgot. But the work will undoubtedly be of very great service, in directing the consideration of our Countrymen to the defects...
I have receivd private information, that it is the intention of the meeting of the Cincinnati to re-elect you as their President, notwithstanding your letter. They think you are so plegd to them, by some of your letters that you cannot refuse the Presidency. The expected removal of Congress to Philadelphia, has again faild by one vote. I am inclind to think, that the more this step is...
In your Letter of the 19 th May last, you were pleased to inform us that you had already accepted Bills which had been drawn on you to a considerable amount by M r. Barclay and Lamb, in consequence of the appropriation which had been made by Congress for forming Treaties with the Barbary Powers; but as we have no advice from you since that date we are at a loss to know whether the whole or...
My Nephew Tho s. Lee Shippen wishes to be recommended to your patronage; & I am satisfyd he cannot be under better protection. I therefore entreat you to let him find favor in your sight, & that you will have the goodness to assist him with your advice, in the conduct of his legal Studies which he purposes to finish at the Temple. Our finances are unhappily at as low an ebb, as they who think...
My Nephew Tho s. Lee Shippen wishes to be recommended to your patronage; & I am satisfyd he cannot be under better protection. I therefore entreat you to let him find favor in your sight, & that you will have the goodness to assist him with your advice, in the conduct of his legal Studies which he purposes to finish at the Temple. Our finances are unhappily at so low an ebb, as they who think...
Being at this place, on private business, I cannot omit the opportunity of writing to you. The critical & alarming situation of this Country, makes me extremely anxious to hear the issue of your negociations at S t. James’s. An obstinate adherence, on the part of the british, to thier present commercial system; will, for a time, involve us in great difficulties. But I am persuaded, the...
I do not know whether I shoud congratulate you on your appointment to the Court of London; since it appears to me the most painful & difficult negociation you coud undertake. The intimate knowlege they have of us, together with the similitude of language manners, & habits will render it more difficult by far to gaurd against their instruments, than against those of any other Court. Besides you...
I have the pleasure of enclosing you a Copy of the treaty lately concluded with the Six Nations, in which the carrying place & the fort of Niagara, together with a competent district round Oswego are securd to the U.S. By attempting a speedier rout down the Susquehannah, we have been thrown greatly back as to the time appointed for the 2d treaty. But I hope we shall have compleated that by the...
Your favor of the 6 th of April found me here two days ago, waiting for the necessary preparatives to a definitive treaty of peace & boundary, which in conjunction with some other gentlemen I have undertaken to negociate with the indian nations. To œconomize, by saving the expence of a monthly bounty to which the troops of Massachusetts & N. Hampshire, were entitled, A Majority of Congress...
I cannot let this opportunity, thõ, from M r. Jefferson’s hurry, a transitory one, pass; without writing you a line. The arrangement of our foreign affairs which makes M r Jay Secretary here, & joins M r. Jefferson with you, must I think be pleasing to you, as they both have a friendship for you & are men of ability. It was my wish that the negociations might be carried on at the Hague or in...
The Ratification having this day, the first on which nine States were represented, been unanimously passed; a special Messenger will be immediately dispatchd with it which gives me an opportunity of writing a few words to you which may arrive speedily & safely. The department of foreing Affairs being not yet filld, the business is of course in disorder & neglected. The arrangement of that...
I arrived in Philadelphia this day and had the honor of receiving your Commands of the 9th. Tho’ we were exceedingly desirous of the assistance of Mr. Adams in what yet remains to be done in Europe; yet his Letters were so pressing, that the Committee to whom they were referrd coud not resist reporting in favor of his resignation. Congress have not yet considerd that report; but I think Madam,...
In a Letter I recievd yesterday, dated Paris, Decr 14. from a Gentleman exceedingly well acquainted with the Politics of St James’s, is this passage—"The acknowledgment of American Independency gives a right to Neutral Powers to trade directly to America. This will be a great advantage shoud the War continue, of which I think there is little probability. Europe seems to be in a disposition for...
I enclose you some late proceedings by which you will perceive that Mr. Laurens is to be made a victim if possible to the system of throwing every thing into one man’s hands. By these votes you will judge pretty accurately who are Devotees to this unjust, unwise, and irrepublican system. Except that of N. Y. where one of the ays was from policy given against the motion of which he was probably...
I wrote you a long letter of the 30th. Decr. 1780 to which I have not yet receivd any answer. But I cannot help writing a line to you by this opportunity, as well to congratulate you on the success of your negociations in Holland as to mention to you what I think may be of material concern to you; that the present minister for foreign affairs is as devoted a partizan of Count de Vergennes and...
Printed text (New York Book and Art Auction Company Catalogue No. 75, 1–2 March 1939). Addressed to “Honble. James Madison, Esqr., in Congress, Philadelphia.” The letter is unsigned, but JM docketed it, “May 24, 1782. A. Lee.” The above Resolves are directed to be sent to you as Instructions. They wait the confirmation of the Senate which has not yet formed a House, but will I hope effect it...
RC (University of Virginia Library). Addressed to “The Honble James Madison Esqr. in Congress Philadelphia.” Docketed by JM, “A. Lee.” I am extremely obligd to you, my dear Sir, for yr. favor of the —— together with the letter enclosd, which you were so good as to forward. It seems to me that the Party in G. Britain who flatter themselves, at this period of the contest, with being able to...
I enclose your Excellency the latest account that has been received here of European Politics. The Governor of Virginia writes us— that a Vessel just arrived from the W. Indies informs, that Count de Grasse has totally defeated the English fleet; taken or destroyd 4 sail of the line, & 100 sail of Transports with 3,000 Troops on board. His Letter is dated the 23d ult. I beg my respects to Mrs...
In your retird situation it will not I hope be disagreable to you to hear what is going on at this place. You will see in what state our western Country rests in Congress, by the Extract that I shall subjoin. The report has not been taken up because the Enemy think they shall acquire an accession of strength, by their usual arts, and by the admission of Vermont, as a state. On our part, not...
Philadelphia, 15 Dec. 1780 . Introducing “the Marquis de Laval and the Count de Custine, two Officers of rank in M. de Rochambeau’s Army; and of the first distinction in France.” RC ( NNP ); 1 p. See La Luzerne to TJ, 18 Dec. 1780 , note.
The Manifest necessity of an immediate supply of money for the public service, & the difficulty I am sure there will be in obtaining it from the Court at Versailles, induce me to suggest to your Excellency that, in my judgment, nothing will promote the attainment of it more than your opinion made known to that Court, of its being indispensible to the continuance of the War. The very high...
FC (Harvard University Library). The remainder of the Furniture, of which you ask the particulars, consists of Knives, Forks Spoons, plates & table Linnen, with two Iron travelling bedsteds, Mattresses & Sheets. The exact quantity of these things I do not know, but they cannot be of much value; being broken Setts, & having been usd for upwards of three years. I have the honor to be with the...
RC ( NA : PCC , No. 78, XIV, 375, 378). I had the honor of receiv’g this day at 1 O C. P.M. a Note from you desiring a sight of my Expenditures on public Account, that you may be enabled to report the proper disposition of them for Liquidation In conformity to your desire, I now send you the Accounts, & will wait upon you immediately if it suit your conveniency, with the Vouchers referrd to in...
Having come here to converse with the worthy Governor, an opportunity of his Dispatch is afforded me of writing you a single line to inform you of my having left Mrs. Adams and all your friends well a few days since. Mr. Hancock is chosen Governor, much owing to your absence and the in-attention of those who wish well to their Country and will probably repent of their inactivity. Measures are...