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Copy: University of Virginia Library As an acknowledgement for your services as Secretary to us, we desire you will accept one hundred Louis-dores which Mr. Grand will be so good as to pay you on receipt of this. We are, Sir, Your most Obedient Servants In Arthur Lee’s hand. 2,400 l.t. Designating WTF as the commissioners’ secretary, it should be noted, did not secure him the position; the...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We have to thank you for the Account you gave us of Capt. Johnson’s Escape and should have acknowledged the same sooner but were in hopes it would have been confirmed by his Arrival, but unhappily your Intelligence was premature and he unhappily remains still a prisoner. In Behalf of Doctr. Franklin and Self I am with much respect Your most Obedient and...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Your Favors of the 1st and 4th Inst. are before us and woud sooner have been replied to, but we were in hopes to have recd. the Samples of Indigo referr’d to in yours of the 1st. They are not arrived. We are not however the less sensible of your Kindness and for the Intelligence given us of the Qualities of Indigo, and at the same time of the price of...
This meeting, in Deane’s quarters in Paris at six in the evening of January 8, was the commissioners’ reward for all the frustrations of the previous year. Vergennes had announced to them on December 12 that France was ready to negotiate, but three weeks of silence followed while the court attempted to secure Spanish participation. Then, when Madrid made clear that it had no intention of...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We have wrote Capt. Nicholson who will procure you a Passage to America and we hope it may be such a one as will be agreable. Inclosed you have a Letter for the Hon’ble the Marine Board which you will send to them and attend their future Orders. Capt. Nicholson will give you notice where to meet him, or the Ship in which you can have a passage. We are...
(I) AL , (II) L , (III) AL : Harvard University Library We print the letters together because they are an entity: the first elicited the second, the second the third, all on the same day. The first was to the commissioners; the second was from, and the third to, Franklin and Deane alone. This was the second quarrel between Lee and his colleagues over who should carry copies of the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I calld at Passi yesterday in expectation of meeting you together, that I might have an explanation of the affair with Mr. Stevenson, in which the whole blame is left to rest most undeservedly on me. I have been informd, that a Letter was written on this subject by Mr. Stevenson to the Commissioners, which has been answerd by you Gentlemen without any...
D : Library of Congress The commissioners met with Gérard on January 8 and agreed to negotiate two treaties, one of amity and commerce and the other for an eventual alliance. On the 18th Gérard presented them with drafts of both, which he asked them to return. They consequently spent the next days in making copies and translations of the drafts, a chore that they dared not entrust to a...
Copy: Library of Congress We desire you would advance to Capt. Paul Jones, of the Ranger, five hundred Louidores, for which your draught upon us will be paid. We are Sir Your most Obedient Servants (Signed) Notation: From the American Commissioners Letter of Credit Passy January 10th 1778 recd. Passy January 10th. 1778 To cover wages and equipment for the Ranger: Morison, Jones , p. 124. Jones...
Transcript: National Archives; incomplete copies: National Archives, Harvard University Library When the conversation turned to day on giving Mr. Williams credit for 200,000 l.t. more on our Banker, as we were just parting there was not time to consider the subject so maturely as the largeness of the demand seems to me to require. But I presume it cannot be either proper or warrantable in us...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Mr. Beaumarchais shewed us your Letter of the 7th Inst. by which we find that you had not so much Confidence in the Commissioners as to deliver the Cargo of the Amphitrite to their Order untill your Disbursements on the two Frigates should be paid you. On our part tho’ we were greatly surprised at the Amount of those Disbursements as well as the prices of...
ALS : National Archives Whereas we understand that Capt. Jones has in View to strike a Stroke upon the Enemy that may be greatly to their Damage, but in its nature not probably profitable to his Ship’s Company, unless some Reward be received from the Congress adequate to the Service done, And we being of Opinion that Rewards in such Cases are not only necessary for Encouragement, but are...
(I) LS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, Harvard University Library; (II) ALS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, Harvard University Library; (III) ALS : National Archives; ALS (draft): Library of Congress; copy: Harvard University Library As it is not in our Power to procure you such a Ship as you expected, we advise you after equipping the Ranger in the best...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am sorry that the things to which I objected having been continued in the Instructions for Capt. Jones prevent me from giving my signature to them except in the manner which I have the honor to send you. I am Gentlemen with great esteem Your most Obedient Servant Notations in different hands: A Lee to BF. & SD / A. Lee to BF. & SD. Lee’s dissent is...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We wrote you the 12 inst. on the Subject of the Letter returned to Mr. Beaumarchais since which we are without any of your favours, except of the 12 inst. which relates to the Sales of the Cargo of the Amphitrite, the acct. of which sales you will please to favour us with a Copy of for our Settlement with that Gentleman. It is a little surprizing that Capt....
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; ALS (draft) or copy: University of Virginia Library We have concluded to make no farther Propositons for the present Treaty. We only wish the Word Sovereignty may be inserted in the two Places propos’d, if not thought absolutely improper. We have the Honour to be with the greatest Esteem, Sir, Your most obedient humble Servants We print the...
AL : American Philosophical Society The background of this note was Lee’s dispatch from England to the committee of secret correspondence of June 3, 1776. William Carmichael was supposed to deliver it but did not for more than two years; he and Silas Deane opened it, kept it, and used it, Lee believed, to cause trouble for him. The statement about the episode that Lee enclosed with his note is...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; two LS : University of Virginia Library; copies: Harvard University Library, South Carolina Historical Society More mature deliberation and fuller lights upon the subject, have satisfyd me that I was wrong in receding from my opinion against the admissibility of the 12th. Article in the proposd commercial treaty. I shoud therefore think myself neglectful of...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I enclose you a note of the price of Arms in the King of Prussia’s Manufactory, sent me by the Baron Schulenburg; with information that the Director had orders to let us have whatever we orderd. He says they will come cheaper if we do not want them so highly finishd as the King requires them. Shoud you think it proper that any of them shoud be sent to...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Mr. Dorsius of Charlestown South Carolina is a Gentleman we would recommend to you as one much employed, and of Confidence, and one very proper to act for you in your Affair at that Place. Should Mr. Dorsius be engaged in other Business, or should he or his Friends be so interested in that Privateer which made Prize of your Vessel (which is possible) that...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: National Archives We have just receivd information that Mr. Thomas Morris, at Nantes, one of the commercial Agents of Congress, is at the point of death; and that his Papers, on that event, will be taken possession of by the Officers of the Crown. As some of these Papers may very materially concern the public business, we beg an Order...
DS : National Archives; copies in French and English: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two), University of Virginia Library; copy in French: Archivo Historico Nacional, Madrid The hope of concluding this treaty and the one that follows had been the commission’s mainstay for fourteen months, but negotiating them took less than three weeks. Gérard began the discussions on...
DS : National Archives; copies in French and English: Massachusetts Historical Society, Harvard Univeristy University Library, National Archives; copies in French: Archives du ministère des affaires étrangères (draft), Harvard University Library, Archivo Historico Nacional, Madrid Treaty of Amity and Commerce. Traité d’Amitié et de Commerce The most Christian King, and the thirteen United...
Copy: Library of Congress We hereby request That you would pay Such Bills as shall be drawn on you upon Our Acct. by the Honl. Wm. Lee Esqr. or the honl. Ralph Izard Esqr. for any sums they may have Occasion for To the Amount of Two Thousand Louis D’orrs to each of them. We are sir Your most Obedient Humble Servants (Signed) Notation by Franklin: Letter of Credit written to M. Grand for Messrs...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Yours of the 6th. came to hand in Course; as Mr. W. Lee will be with you before the receipt of this we refer you to him for what has been done as to the Late Mr. Morris’s Papers &c. In regard to the Ship purchased by you, Commanded by Capt. J. Green which you Offer to assign over to the Public account we are content that you do it and Charge the amount to...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: University of Virginia Library I receivd yesterday the above Note, which I do not well understand. Is it intended, as the Note imports, to send away the public Dispatches without any consultation upon them, or about the person, (with whose name I have not been favord,) to whom they are to be confided? I have the honor to be, with great esteem...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy without the postscript: University of Virginia Library The Answer with which you honord me, this day, to my Letter of yesterday, in which I desird to know whether the public Dispatches were to be sent away without any consultation on their Contents, informs me “that you are and were ready to consult with me, whenever I please upon any circumstance...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; transcript and two copies: National Archives We have now the Pleasure of sending you the Treaties of Amity and Alliance with France compleated after long Deliberation and signed the 6th. Instant. This is an Event that will give our States such an Appearance of Stability, as must strengthen our Credit, encourage other Powers in Europe to ally themselves...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We have given Capt. Courter whom we have entrusted with our Dispatches one hundred Louis D’Ors: His Journey to Corogne will be very expensive. He will keep an Account of his Expences which he will give you and we recommend him to you for such further allowance, independant of the Actual expence of his Voyage, as you shall judge adequate to his Services. He...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We Deliver you herewith our Letters and Dispatches for Congress which you will take Care of, and on no account Let them go out of your Possession until you deliver them up to the Hon’ble Committee of Foreign Affairs. On your embarking secure them in a Proper manner for being Sunk, in Case of being actually taken by the Enemy. We give you 100 Louis D’ors for...